Dean's Story

Dean joined Watsi on December 31st, 2013. Eight years ago, Dean joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Dean's most recent donation traveled 4,200 miles to support Anghi, a three-year-old girl from Bolivia, to fund heart surgery.

Impact

Dean has funded healthcare for 126 patients in 14 countries.

Patients funded by Dean

Chisuka is a widow who lost her husband in February 2023. Chisuka has never had a child of her own but has been keeping three orphans aged 15, 10, and 6 years old for her late sister who passed on 5 years ago. Her husband had lost his first wife 30 years ago who left a 6-year-old son who has been brought up by Chisuka until now. He is a soldier who is married with one child. Chisuka and her late husband loved these orphans and brought them up like their own before death separated them. Chisuka shared that a month after losing her husband, she was chased out of her main house and most of her belongings were taken by her in-laws. Chisuka is now in the boys’ quarter together with her children while the main house is rented but the money is not shared with her. Her stepson withdrew his support after the death of his father. Chisuka started selling groundnut flour for a living. She likes praying and encouraging her children to work hard at school since life has changed for the worse. Chisuka was well until three years ago when she started experiencing cramping abdominal pains and felt a hard mass on the left side of her abdomen. Chisuka has been to different hospitals without much improvement. Of late Chisuka has had overwhelming abdominal pains, bleeding tendencies, loss of appetite leading to loss of weight, a lot of discomforts leading to more stress, weakness, and general body pain. On 24th January, Chisuka was booked and seen by the gynecologist at our medical partner's care center PIH who confirmed the diagnosis of multiple uterine fibroids through an ultrasound scan. She was notified about the need for a surgical intervention called total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) which is the removal of the uterus, including the cervix. Chisuka was then referred to the Watsi program due to her financial status. She is contributing what she can and needs help raising $1,363 to fund her surgery. Fibroids are abnormal growths that develop in a woman's uterus. Fibroids might become quite large leading to severe abdominal pain and heavy bleeding. If left untreated, fibroids continue to grow, both in size and number worsening the symptoms; the heavy bleeding may become worse causing anemia which may be fatal. After the surgery, it is expected that Chisuka will stop having unbearable abdominal pains and heavy bleeding and will continue taking care of her late sister’s children and living a more comfortable life. Chisuka, with tears in her eyes, said, “Please help me, I have faced more than I could, and now I need a breather and a comfortable life to let me render support to my children.”

$1,363raised
Fully funded

Catherine is a three year old toddler and is the second child in a family of two children. She lives in Tanzania. She is a quiet and laid-back child who doesn’t speak much. She enjoys spending time with her mother, who is employed as a pharmacist. This sometimes requires her mother to take her to work. Catherine’s father is a carpenter, crafting furniture in Mpanda. Both parents work diligently to meet their family’s needs, but their income is limited, preventing them from covering substantial medical expenses. Catherine has clubfoot of both legs. She began displaying signs of bowed legs when she started walking. Her legs gradually bowed outward, and while the defect was mild, it worsened as she grew older. This condition causes discomfort when she walks, making it challenging to ascend stairs or squat. During one of our partner's outreach visits, the medical team had the opportunity to meet Catherine and her parents. After a brief assessment, the team diagnosed her with fluorosis and bilateral bowleggedness. Following our visit, the family was advised to seek treatment at the medical centre. In August, after a two-day journey, Catherine arrived at the centre. She quickly felt at ease, as she was familiar with some of the medical team members. Following an initial meeting, she was scheduled to see an orthopaedic surgeon. Fortunately, Catherine's family traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, The Plaster House NGO. There, the team will begin clubfoot treatment on September 14th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $935 to fund Catherine's clubfoot repair. After treatment, her legs will be corrected and she can grow up active and healthy. Catherine’s mother says, “I wish my daughter to be better, this condition limits her so much and I feel sorry for her because she has a hard time keeping up with her friends.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Eliud is a 41-year-old truck driver. He is quiet and talks with a lot of calmness. He is married with two children aged 2 and 6 years and the sole breadwinner for his family, as his wife is a homemaker who does not have any source of income. To earn a living, Eliud works as a truck driver earning a commission on jobs. He shared that depending on the availability of work, his income is often inconsistent and negligible. Following a road accident, he has been unable to work and his family has been incapable of raising funds for his treatment. He is requesting financial assistance as he has no medical insurance coverage. On 12th March, Eliud was involved in a road accident. While driving his truck, he swayed off the road as he tried to avoid a pedestrian and hit a post, suffering a broken ankle and a bruised leg. He was rushed to a local health facility for first aid and later referred to our medical partner at Kijabe Hospital for surgery and an orthopedic review. An x-ray revealed a right open tibial plafond fracture. This is the joint between the tibia and ankle bone. He went to the operating theater and had an external fixator, called ex-fix, put in place to stabilize his bones. He was discharged two days later and advised to come after two weeks for a clinic check-up. When he returned to the clinic, doctors determined that an urgent tibial plafond ORIF (Ankle ORIF) is required. It is difficult for Eliud to walk or work. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On April 5th, Eliud will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will help him walk easily again and he will be able to resume work to earn for his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $979 to fund this procedure. Eliud says, “I broke my leg during this accident and cannot walk. As a driver, I cannot work because of the fracture. I need this surgery to make the leg well and be able to drive.”

$979raised
Fully funded