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U Chit is a monk from Burma who needs $1,500 to remove bladder stones.

U Chit
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  • $1,280 raised, $220 to go
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November 19, 2019

U Chit is a 55-year-old man from Myawaddy Township, Karen State, Burma. He divorced his wife seven years ago and has two daughters and three sons. His youngest daughter lives with his ex-wife in Yangon and their other children live in Myawaddy Township. In March 2019, he entered into monkhood. Now, he receives alms from laypeople and from his children.

In February 2019, U Chit began to experience back pain and a burning sensation when urinating. To treat his symptoms, he bought medication from a nearby pharmacy. However, after taking the medicine, he did not feel any better. He later went to a local clinic where he received more medication for his symptoms. They suggested that he go to Myawadday Hospital to receive an ultrasound scan. However, he did not go to the hospital because he did not think he would be able to pay for the cost of the scan. Instead, he continued taking the medicine that the doctor had prescribed. Unfortunately, his pain when urinating did not get better. Finally, U Chit decided to visit Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), where he got his hernia treated four years ago, to seek treatment.

U Chit arrived at MTC on April 24th, 2019, where an ultrasound scan revealed that he had a bladder stone. The next day, he was sent to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) where he received an injection and oral medication. On May 16th, 2019, he received an Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP) test for further investigation. After the IVP test, the doctor told him that he requires surgery and is scheduled for 20th November 2019.

Currently, U Chit experiences back pain and he continues to feel a burning sensation when urinating. Aside from his concerns about his condition, he is worried about financial problems because he is a monk and does not have a regular income. U Chit likes reading Buddhist texts and newspapers in his free time.

He said, “I want to cure my condition as soon as possible and I would like to focus on religious activities. After I am cured, I also would like to help find treatment for my daughter who has suffered from a stroke.”

U Chit is a 55-year-old man from Myawaddy Township, Karen State, Burma. He divorced his wife seven years ago and has two daughters and three...

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U Chit's Timeline

  • November 19, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    U Chit was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Burma.

  • November 20, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    U Chit received treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 27, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    U Chit's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • February 26, 2020
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting U Chit's treatment update from Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    U Chit is currently raising funds for his treatment.

Treatment
Cystolithotomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $5,517 for U Chit's treatment
Subsidies fund $4,017 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,601
Medical Staff
$823
Medication
$4
Supplies
$784
Labs
$84
Radiology
$50
Other
$171
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The symptoms of bladder stone includes lower abdominal pain, frequent urge to urinate, painful urination, and difficulty urinating. Some patients will pass urine with blood and have dark and cloudy urine.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot sleep well because of the pain and in severe cases they have to live with a urinary catheter which can be uncomfortable for them. Patients without a catheter are in pain when they pass urine. Patients are also not able to work when their conditions are severe and have to spend limited income on paying for multiple appointments, transportation to the hospital, and medication. Many patients end up going into debt over time.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most of the patients who live in remote areas cannot afford to go to the hospital or have difficulty accessing one during the rainy season. They rely on traditional medicine to treat themselves which usually only relieves their symptoms for a short while. Due to this and a lack of affordable health care, they live with their condition until it becomes severe.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Urine tests and an ultrasound are first conducted to diagnose the patient. Afterwards, the doctor may recommend an x-ray or a computerized tomography scan if the ultrasound is not clear. When the diagnosis is confirmed, a treatment plan is scheduled. Some patients will undergo shockwave lithotripsy, laser treatment to break up the stones into small enough pieces that can be passed while urinating. Most of the time, when the stones are very large, the doctor will recommend surgery to remove the stone. During surgery, the bladder stone is removed through an incision in the lower abdomen. Patients requiring surgery usually spend 4-5 days in the hospital before they are discharged.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

After surgery, the patient will be able to pass urine normally and they will no longer experience lower abdominal pain. They will no longer require a catheter, and they will be able to sleep well at night. Adult patients will be able to go back to work and will be able to contribute financially to their households.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Complications or risks are rare but can include tears in the bladder wall during the surgery as well as urinary tract infections and residual stones within the bladder.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our patients live in remote areas or in refugees camps along the Thai-Burma border. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Once laser treatment has failed or where stones are too large there are no alternatives. Without surgery, the stones may increase in size causing further discomfort, pain, and possibly death.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Bu

Bu is a 53-year-old man who lives with his wife, two sons and two daughters in a refugee camp in northern Thailand. He and his family fled there from Karen State, Burma, due to conflict in their area. Every month, Bu's household received 1,514 baht (approx. 50 USD) as part of their camp rations. Bu's oldest son works on farms outside of the camp as a seasonal day laborer. He makes 1,100 baht (approx. 37 USD) per month. The rest of Bu's three children are students, and his wife is a homemaker. Despite receiving free primary health care services and schooling in the camp, Bu's family is struggling to make ends meet every month. Bu started to suffer from back pain and fever in 2015. He also experienced slight discomfort and a burning sensation while urinating. When he went to the camp's clinic, run by Malteser International (MI), he received oral medications. For a few months, his symptoms and pain disappeared, but later on, they returned. Whenever the pain would worsen, Bu would receive more medication from the camp's clinic. On 2 July 2020, when Bu's symptoms worsened, he went back to the clinic to received more medication. Noting that he kept returning to the clinic with severe symptoms, Bu was referred to Mae Sariang Hospital for further treatment. At the hospital, he received a blood and urine test, as well as a kidney, ureter, and bladder (KUB) x-ray. The doctor informed him that he has a stone in his left kidney. The doctor then referred him to Suandok Hospital in Chiang Mai for further treatment. On 29 July 2020, Bu saw the doctor at Chiang Mai Hospital. The doctor told him that he needed to undergo an intravenous pyelogram (IVP), a type of diagnostic test that uses an injection of contrast material to evaluate the kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Once he underwent the IVP, the doctor diagnosed him with a type of kidney stone called a staghorn stone. Bu was then scheduled to receive surgery to remove the kidney stone on 16 August 2020. Unable to pay for his treatment, MI referred Bu to Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing surgery. Currently, Bu experiences back pain and a burning sensation while urinating. He sometimes experiences headaches and cannot breathe well because of the severe pain. In his free time, his favorite thing to do is to help with household chores and grow vegetables for his family. Now, Burma Children Medical Fund needs your help in funding the cost of Bu's $1,500 surgery. Bu shared, “I still experience back pain and a burning sensation while urinating. Sometimes due to the pain, I have a headache and I have difficulty breathing. But I am very excited that I will be free from this prolonged pain after surgery."

81% funded

81%funded
$1,225raised
$275to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Bu

Bu is a 53-year-old man who lives with his wife, two sons and two daughters in a refugee camp in northern Thailand. He and his family fled there from Karen State, Burma, due to conflict in their area. Every month, Bu's household received 1,514 baht (approx. 50 USD) as part of their camp rations. Bu's oldest son works on farms outside of the camp as a seasonal day laborer. He makes 1,100 baht (approx. 37 USD) per month. The rest of Bu's three children are students, and his wife is a homemaker. Despite receiving free primary health care services and schooling in the camp, Bu's family is struggling to make ends meet every month. Bu started to suffer from back pain and fever in 2015. He also experienced slight discomfort and a burning sensation while urinating. When he went to the camp's clinic, run by Malteser International (MI), he received oral medications. For a few months, his symptoms and pain disappeared, but later on, they returned. Whenever the pain would worsen, Bu would receive more medication from the camp's clinic. On 2 July 2020, when Bu's symptoms worsened, he went back to the clinic to received more medication. Noting that he kept returning to the clinic with severe symptoms, Bu was referred to Mae Sariang Hospital for further treatment. At the hospital, he received a blood and urine test, as well as a kidney, ureter, and bladder (KUB) x-ray. The doctor informed him that he has a stone in his left kidney. The doctor then referred him to Suandok Hospital in Chiang Mai for further treatment. On 29 July 2020, Bu saw the doctor at Chiang Mai Hospital. The doctor told him that he needed to undergo an intravenous pyelogram (IVP), a type of diagnostic test that uses an injection of contrast material to evaluate the kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Once he underwent the IVP, the doctor diagnosed him with a type of kidney stone called a staghorn stone. Bu was then scheduled to receive surgery to remove the kidney stone on 16 August 2020. Unable to pay for his treatment, MI referred Bu to Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing surgery. Currently, Bu experiences back pain and a burning sensation while urinating. He sometimes experiences headaches and cannot breathe well because of the severe pain. In his free time, his favorite thing to do is to help with household chores and grow vegetables for his family. Now, Burma Children Medical Fund needs your help in funding the cost of Bu's $1,500 surgery. Bu shared, “I still experience back pain and a burning sensation while urinating. Sometimes due to the pain, I have a headache and I have difficulty breathing. But I am very excited that I will be free from this prolonged pain after surgery."

81% funded

81%funded
$1,225raised
$275to go