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AJ Kessler

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

AJ's Story

AJ joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Six years ago, AJ joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. AJ's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Sary, a waiter from Cambodia, to fund foot surgery.

Impact

AJ has funded healthcare for 94 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by AJ

Bernard

Bernard is a driver from Kenya. Bernard is a father of 8 children from his two wives. He lives in a rental house and is the main breadwinner in the family. He does not have national insurance nor did he own the vehicle he drove when the road accident occurred. Bernard is a driver in the public transport system, commonly referred to as matatus. On 12th of February 2020, John was involved in a grisly road accident that left 22 people with various injuries. According to Bernard, the oncoming vehicle was overlapping at high speed at a place that is increasingly becoming a blackspot. Bernard and the other patients were brought to Watsi's medical partner care center and immediately started receiving treatment. Bernard had a nail implant on his left femur and a right foot closed reduction and percutaneous pinning that morning. He has been recovering and is planned for a second surgery to correct the acetabular open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). He is in chronic pain and is not able to move from his bed. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On February 19th, Bernard will undergo a fracture repair procedure called an ORIF. This treatment will help Bernard heal well and be able to walk and eventually work again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,042 to fund this procedure. Bernard says, “I am appealing for help to have the surgery. My family is not able to raise the funds needed. I am however hopeful that soon I will be able to walk.”

100% funded

$1,042raised
Fully funded
U Chit

U Chit is a 55-year-old man from Myawaddy Township, Karen State, Burma. He divorced his wife seven years ago and has two daughters and three sons. His youngest daughter lives with his ex-wife in Yangon and their other children live in Myawaddy Township. In March 2019, he entered into monkhood. Now, he receives alms from laypeople and from his children. In February 2019, U Chit began to experience back pain and a burning sensation when urinating. To treat his symptoms, he bought medication from a nearby pharmacy. However, after taking the medicine, he did not feel any better. He later went to a local clinic where he received more medication for his symptoms. They suggested that he go to Myawadday Hospital to receive an ultrasound scan. However, he did not go to the hospital because he did not think he would be able to pay for the cost of the scan. Instead, he continued taking the medicine that the doctor had prescribed. Unfortunately, his pain when urinating did not get better. Finally, U Chit decided to visit Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), where he got his hernia treated four years ago, to seek treatment. U Chit arrived at MTC on April 24th, 2019, where an ultrasound scan revealed that he had a bladder stone. The next day, he was sent to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) where he received an injection and oral medication. On May 16th, 2019, he received an Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP) test for further investigation. After the IVP test, the doctor told him that he requires surgery and is scheduled for 20th November 2019. Currently, U Chit experiences back pain and he continues to feel a burning sensation when urinating. Aside from his concerns about his condition, he is worried about financial problems because he is a monk and does not have a regular income. U Chit likes reading Buddhist texts and newspapers in his free time. He said, “I want to cure my condition as soon as possible and I would like to focus on religious activities. After I am cured, I also would like to help find treatment for my daughter who has suffered from a stroke.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Irshad

Irshad was diagnosed with an anorectal malformation a day or two after birth. This followed frequent vomiting, poor feeding and distention of his abdomen. A colostomy (a perforation on his abdomen to aid in passing stool) was put in place at day three and after six weeks a pull-through procedure was done. This was to create an anal opening. In order to keep the newly created anus from closing, Irshad’s parents were advised to do dilation which according to them, they faithfully did. Upon review, the doctor noted that the anal opening was not well dilated and would need a revision. The doctor then referred them to Watsi Medical Partner care center BethanyKids Hospital where surgery has been recommended. If not treated, Irshad will not be able to pass stool normally. The cost of buying colostomy bags has proven to be quite expensive for his parents and thus, they have resulted to using old clothes. This puts little Irshad at risk of infection and scarring at the colostomy site due to occasional leakages. Irshad’s parents hoped that the national health insurance fund would help fund the treatment, but since it is a repeat surgery, their request was turned down. Irshad’s father is employed casually as an office messenger while his mother is a full-time mom. Irshad is the second born of two children. He lives with his parents and elder brother in a two-room rental house in the coastal region of Kenya. His father assures that he can raise Kes15,000, but that is not enough to support the surgery needed and thus appeals for help.

100% funded

$708raised
Fully funded