H

Hanung's Story

Hanung joined Watsi on August 1st, 2015. Five years ago, Hanung joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Hanung's most recent donation supported Faith, a four-year-old girl from Kenya, to fund a fracture repair procedure.

Impact

Hanung has funded healthcare for 31 patients in 8 countries.

All patients funded by Hanung

Faith

Faith is a talkative four-year-old girl from Kenya. She is the second born child in a family of three. On December 24th, Faith was brought to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kapsowar Hospital by her mother. She had a bad fall two days prior while playing with her friends. Faith sustained an injury on her left hand and is unable to flex her elbow. Upon arrival to the hospital, they conducted an x-ray which confirmed that she had a displaced supracondylar fracture. Doctors recommend that her fracture be fixed quickly so as to avoid improper healing. Faith has been admitted in the pediatrics ward and is waiting to undergo a fracture repair procedure. She is currently experiencing pain and discomfort. Though Faith's surgery has been scheduled, her family is still uncertain on how her care will be funded. Faith's father is a small shopkeeper and her mother is a housewife. Her father earns an average of US$52 in a month, and shared that his income is too little to meet all the needs of his children. Their family said it feels impossible to raise funds for Faith’s surgery. They are requesting any well-wisher to support them so that their daughter can have this operation. Fortunately, on December 28th Faith will undergo a type of fracture repair procedure called an open reduction and external fixation. Once recovered, her quality of life will significantly improve and she be able to use her hand normally again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $801 to fund this procedure. Her mother shared, “Nothing worries me like watching my child cry in pain. It has been a nightmare to me and a difficult time in our family. We are looking forward to seeing her in good spirits again."

100% funded

$801raised
Fully funded
Mary

Mary is a businesswoman from Kenya. She is married and is a mother of three adult children. Two months ago, while relaxing at home, Mary felt a lump in her breast with a burning sensation. She ignored it at first, but it gradually became painful. Worried, she visited Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kijabe Hospital in mid-September for medical attention and care. After review, doctors ordered a CT scan and a core biopsy, which confirmed her worst fear - that she had breast cancer. The biopsy test found an infiltrating ductal carcinoma, but luckily she had no metastasis yet. Doctors recommend she undergo a mastectomy procedure as soon as possible to prevent the spread of the deadly cancerous cells. Although she is struggling to come to terms with the shocking news, Mary's main worry now is the high, unaffordable cost of the surgery. She runs a small kiosk that generates little profit each day. Her husband is a small-scale farmer who owns one cow. The family relies on the proceeds from their eatery and milk sales to survive. Sadly, they had to sell their only cow to raise money for Mary’s treatment. However, the money from the sale is barely enough to cover the cost of mastectomy surgery. Her kids do not have stable jobs, and Mary says they are struggling. She has no national health insurance or any medical coverage, and is thus appealing for financial help. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $857 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Mary. The procedure is scheduled to take place on October 23rd. After treatment, Mary will hopefully return to a cancer-free life. Mary shared, “I am shocked that I was diagnosed with this deadly cancer. But I am more worried that I am unable to afford the only procedure that can stop the spread of the disease. I wasn’t prepared for a procedure of this magnitude. I appreciate any support you can provide.”

100% funded

$857raised
Fully funded
Su

Su is 14-year-old girl from Thailand. She lives with her parents in a village in Take Province, Thailand. After Su completed grade five she was unable to continue her schooling since there are no middle or high schools in their area and her parents could not afford to send her to school in nearby Burma. Today she and her parents are agricultural day laborers, each earning 150 baht (approx. 5 USD) per day. In the past, they used to have enough work but for the past four months they are not able to work as much as they would like to. Due to COVID-19 restrictions on the number of people who can gather, employers are only able to hire five to seven workers in a day. To ensure that everyone has a chance to work in their community, all the day laborers take turns working in a week. Around April or May 2020, Su noticed that she was not feeling well. When she explained how she felt to her mother, she was reassured that this was normal. However, around September 15th, Su started to suffer from terrible lower back and abdominal pain. When she went to Mae Tao Clinic she received an ultrasound which indicated a mass in her uterus. She was then referred to Mae Sot Hospital where she received another ultrasound and physical examination. The doctor then confirmed there was a growing mass in her uterus. The doctor told her they will be able to remove the mass with surgery. Su sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. She is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on October 1st and is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once she recovers, Su hopes to help her parents out financially. “I will go back to work with my mother and I will save money,” she said. “I will build my parents a new house on our land in Burma. I will also learn to sew and do that [becoming a seamstress] for the rest of my life in my own shop."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Joseph

Joseph is a 19-year-old joyful boy who hails from the Mount Elgon area in Kenya. He shared that he is known around the village as the guy with the large mass due to his protruding hernia on his abdomen. In February 2019, Joseph was involved in a road traffic accident when he was headed home from his daily labor. He sustained injuries in his stomach where he was rushed to a hospital and an exploratory laparotomy was done. A few days later, Joseph was discharged from hospital and as his wounds were healing he started developing a mass on his stomach. Joseph feared to go to the hospital again because he didn’t want to be in pain. As the mass grew bigger, Joseph started worrying about his life. He went to his church pastor where the church raised money to send him to the capital city to get it removed but they were told he needed a specialist who demanded a lot of money which they could not afford. Joseph had given up on the possibility of getting treated. It was not until a friend asked his pastor to bring him to our hospital, where he was diagnosed with an incisional hernia that he was happy to be told that his condition can be treated. Joseph's father died of illness while he was young. He dropped out of school in Grade 4 because his mother re-married and she didn't have money to send him to school, so he began to work in farms to help get money for his daily needs like food. Joseph works in the farms and gardens and enjoys planting and farming. He wants to be able to have a big farm and grow lots of vegetables, corn, and millet. Joseph has gone to other doctors to help with his mass but everyone said it wasn’t operable. He is most disturbed by the way people who stare at him. Joseph is a very practical man and looks forward to going back to his farm and working hard to have a good crop and harvest and have a good life. Joseph is worried that he might not get a wife due to his condition. He is also facing stigma by people talking about his condition and has been denied work. If he is not treated, his condition will continue to worsen and his future plans feel bleak to him if he does not get treatment. Joseph told us, “I just want to be able to find a girl to marry and have a family.”

100% funded

$471raised
Fully funded
John

John is a casual laborer from Kenya and the oldest of three children in his family with a single mother. John is currenrtly unemployed and previously he did some casual work at a bus stage: to help fill passengers for a small daily wage. His mother does casual work like cleaning clothes for neighbors and any other job available. On 4th April 2019 John was hit by a vehicle that lost control and met him on the side of the road. He sustained injuries to both legs. He was taken to a nearby hospital and x-rays showed he had closed fracture head of femur left leg and open fracture right tibia. Through the earlier support of friends and neighbors, he had an open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) surgery on the left side and external fixator on his right leg. Unfortunately even after the wound was healed his family could not afford another ORIF surgery which is much needed. Doctors are concerned that if not treated soon, John may get sepsis in his bones and may never be able to use his legs again. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On May 5th, John will undergo an ORIF fracture repair procedure. We hope with treatment, he will regain normal use of his legs and that an infection will also be avoided. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $998 to fund this procedure. “I have suffered a whole year in bed and pain that seems to have no end. I really plead for support and God will bless you. I can’t imagine seeing these metal bars removed from my leg and walking again, even if by crutches,” says John.

100% funded

$998raised
Fully funded