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Success! Francis from Kenya raised $535 to fund testicular surgery.

Francis
100%
  • $535 raised, $0 to go
$535
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Francis's treatment was fully funded on June 11, 2020.

Photo of Francis post-operation

January 16, 2020

Francis underwent testicular surgery.

Francis had successful surgery to descend his right testis. The surgery minimized his risks of suffering fertility issues, testicular cancer and/or inguinal hernia and testicular torsion in the future. He will have a more normal and better quality of life ahead.

“Thank you so much for helping my son get treatment,” says Francis’ mother.

Francis had successful surgery to descend his right testis. The surgery minimized his risks of suffering fertility issues, testicular cancer...

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November 26, 2019

Francis is a young boy from Kenya. The second born of two children, Francis, lives with his parents and sibling in a one-room house in Central Kenya. His mother is a stay-at-home mom while his father is a works at their local bus terminus.

Francis was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Francis has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future.

Francis will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on November 28. AMHF is requesting $535 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

“I will appreciate help to see my young son getting better,” says Francis’ mother.

Francis is a young boy from Kenya. The second born of two children, Francis, lives with his parents and sibling in a one-room house in Cent...

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Francis's Timeline

  • November 26, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Francis was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • November 28, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Francis received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 29, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Francis's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 16, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Francis's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • June 11, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Francis's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 8 donors

Funded by 8 donors

Treatment
Orchidopexy (Single)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $535 for Francis's treatment
Hospital Fees
$530
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$1
Supplies
$0
Labs
$4
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

One of the testicles either appears to be missing or cannot be felt in the scrotum.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Left untreated, this condition can lead to infertility. The higher temperature inside the body can affect sperm production. Men with both testicles affected are more likely to experience fertility-related issues than men with only one affected testicle. This condition can also cause inguinal hernia, in which the intestine protrudes through a weakened area in the abdominal wall. Only surgery can correct this condition, which can otherwise result in intestinal damage or death. Finally, this condition is a risk factor for testicular cancer. If surgery is performed early, this risk is limited.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Undescended testis is the most common birth anomaly in boys. This condition is present in about 1-4.5% of newborns, with a higher incidence in premature babies (30-45%). Unilateral undescended testis is four times more likely than bilateral. Data on this condition is scarce in Kenya, so the true prevalence of acquired undescended testicles is still unknown.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for an average of three days. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment will reduce the risk of infertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is very treatable, and the procedure is low-risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

An alternative to surgery is to use synthetic hormones that encourage the testicle to move into the scrotum. Hormone therapy is only recommended if the child’s testicle(s) are close to the scrotum. However, hormone therapy is not commonly available in Kenya.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Benjamin

Benjamin is a 63-year-old man from Kenya. He is a quiet man who works hard and normally keeps to himself. Two weeks ago, Benjamin sustained an injury on his left hand while coming from his farm. It had rained heavily and Benjamin was rushing home. On his way, he fell on a hard surface and when he stood up, he realized that he could not lift his hand and was feeling pain on his left hand. Benjamin could not access treatment the same day because there’s no health facility near his home. The following morning, Benjamin was accompanied by his wife to a health centre. Because they were not confident of treating him, they just placed a sling on his arm and referred him to a district hospital for further care. Due to lack of finances, Benjamin and his wife returned home to look for money and after three days they were able to go to the hospital. Due to the ongoing medical practitioners strike, no one was there to help them and they finally decided to come to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center called AIC Kapsowar Hospital. The first returned home to look for money to gather for their travel and other expenses. Because of their socioeconomic status, it took them another ten days to raise USD130 through the help of their neighbors. On arrival to our partner hospital, an x-ray was done which confirmed his left humerus fracture. Treatment requires surgery and an implant to fix his fracture. Benjamin was born and raised in a small village called Kamok where most people work in farms or other small unsteady jobs. He has a family and has been blessed with eight children, five girls and three boys. Benjamin never was able to have a formal education so he doesn’t speak Kiswahili, but his local language Marakwet. His family lives in a small mud hut with grass as a roof and they get their food from their small farm, consisting mostly of millet, beans, and vegetables. Benjamin likes spending his days on his farm. He is the breadwinner of the family and now feels distressed because he can’t provide for them due to his condition. He is worried about the obstacles his family would face if his hand will not be treated and also learning that he has arthritis. Their family doesn’t have money to pay for his surgery and his wife shared that this would be "almost impossible" for them. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On September 18th, Benjamin will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will help him regain utility of his hand and be free from pain and any other complications arising from untreated fractures. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,016 to fund this procedure. Benjamin shared with us, “I just want not to be in pain anymore and be healthy and happy and have a good life because my family needs me the most.”

72% funded

72%funded
$736raised
$280to go
Marline

Marline is a 7-year-old boy from Kenya. He is a cheerful boy and a Grade 2 student at Jayden Academy. Marline wants to be an engineer when he grows up. Marline's mother says that he loves to dismantle and assemble electronics in the house, and is well on his way to his career dreams. Additionally, Marline has a condition called spina bifida. Earlier in April 2020, Marline was playing with his friends when his mother noticed a small pimple-like wound on his right foot. It was small at first, but slowly started to grow bigger in size. His mother rushed him to a nearby health centre in their hometown, where he has been undergoing dressing in the facility but they have not seen much improvement. Since Marline has been coming to Kijabe Hospital for his spina bifida clinic, he opted to seek review in the hospital and get this wound checked. He was reviewed a week ago by the plastic and pediatric surgical teams, who recommended that he undergoes debridement, excision of calcaneal ulcer, and flap cover surgery to clean and heal his infected wound. Currently, Marline is in pain and at risk for further infection. If left unattended, the wound may result in severe infection and possible amputation. Unfortunately, these procedures are costly for Marline's family. His mother is a single mother raising two kids on her own. Their family lives in a bedsitter house in Ruai, at the outskirts of Nairobi. Marline's father left the family and his responsibility. Marline's mother is the sole breadwinner of the family and she has a small grocery kiosk. The total profit from the venture is very small, and her close relatives are not able to assist with financial support. Their family appeals for help. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Marline receive treatment. On January 6th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to help heal the wound and prevent possible complications. Now, Marline's family needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Marline's mother says, “This wound is worsening by the day. If left unattended, doctors say that he might lose his leg. This would be hurting all of us. Kindly help us as we really don’t have a way out."

65% funded

65%funded
$772raised
$413to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.