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Success! Myar from Burma raised $1,500 to fund heart surgery.

Myar
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Myar's treatment was fully funded on December 21, 2019.

Photo of Myar post-operation

December 23, 2019

Myar underwent heart surgery.

Before the surgery, Myar frequently had chest pains and headaches. She was unable to eat or sleep well at night. Now her condition has improved greatly. She is very happy that she feels better.

She said, “Now, I can clean the house, cook, and feed my two pigs all by myself!” Further, she shared, “I will never forget Watsi donors and BCMF because they helped me receive treatment for my health problem by paying for my surgery and medication. Thank you for everything. In the future, I will continue to work alongside my husband, and I will try my best to send my children to school. I hope that after that [completing their schooling], they will become educated people.”

Before the surgery, Myar frequently had chest pains and headaches. She was unable to eat or sleep well at night. Now her condition has impro...

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October 18, 2019

Myar is a 34-year-old from Pin Lounge Township, Shan State, Burma. She lives with her husband and four children who are all students. Myar and her husband work as farmers and grown rice, corn and onion depending on the season.

In July 2018, Myar moved to Singapore and worked as a domestic worker. After one month of working in Singapore, Myar started to get frequent headaches and felt tired. A few days later, she wanted to go to a clinic but Myar’s employer told her not to go because the treatment cost is very expensive there. However, she feels pain in her chest and couldn’t work anymore.

Myar’s sister who stays in Mae Sot asked her to come to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Mae Sot. On July 25th 2019, Myar arrived to Mae Sot Clinic and was referred her to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for an echocardiogram. The echo result shows that Myar’s heart has a hole and the doctor told her that she would need to undergo surgery.

Currently, Myar feels uncomfortable while sleeping because of her chest pain. She sometimes has high fever and she also has difficulty breathing. She is tired very easily.

Myar said, “When I am fully recovered, I will work hard with my husband and pay back my debt. I will also support my children so that they can receive an education.”

Myar is a 34-year-old from Pin Lounge Township, Shan State, Burma. She lives with her husband and four children who are all students. Myar a...

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Myar's Timeline

  • October 18, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Myar was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Burma.

  • October 18, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Myar received treatment at Pinlon Private Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 22, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Myar's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 21, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Myar's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 23, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Myar's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 29 donors

Funded by 29 donors

Treatment
Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) Closure
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,915 for Myar's treatment
Subsidies fund $3,415 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,500
Medical Staff
$1,066
Medication
$534
Supplies
$1,700
Labs
$100
Radiology
$15
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, cyanosis (a blue tinge to the skin), clubbed fingernails, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Burma has a long queue of congenital cardiac patients who need surgery. With only four fully trained cardiac surgeons in Burma, children with congenital heart defects may have extreme difficulty accessing treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Doctors may combine catheter and surgical procedures to repair complex congenital heart defects. If the defect cannot be fixed with a catheter, the patient will undergo an open heart surgery to close holes in the heart.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Komugisha

Komugisha is a 46-year-old mother of two from Uganda. Her oldest is 21 years old and her youngest is 14 years old and in secondary school. Komugisha is a second wife to her husband who is a casual laborer at national teachers’ college in Uganda. She shared that he offers minimal support to her and their children so Komugisha stays with her parents. In 2006, Komugisha had a c-section delivery for her last born and said that she has been in pain and had challenges since that time. Due to severe pain, she has stopped her usual duties of managing her small bar and hotel and currently stays home feeling helpless, she says. She came to Rushoroza Hospital to seek medical advice. At Rushoroza, Komugisha presented with a long-standing history of lower abdominal pains and reports to have several treatments with no improvement. If not treated, severe lower abdominal pains will continue to affect her quality of life negatively. She has been diagnosed with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease and needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $228 to fund Komugisha's surgery. On October 14th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Komugisha will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and her quality of life will improve. Komugisha says, “I pray that I may get the required treatment soon because I am in severe pain; I can no longer carry out my survival duties normally. Given the opportunity, I will resume my small hotel and bar as soon as possible.”

10% funded

10%funded
$25raised
$203to go
Ayebazibwe

Ayebazibwe is a farmer from Uganda. She came to the hospital with a swelling on her right cheek, which she has had for over three years. She shared that the swelling brings her headaches and causes her paralysis around the localized area on her face. She feels it more on voluntary actives like chewing and when she widens the mouth as she is coughing. This has hindered her quality of health and lifestyle which if not treated, may continue impacting her quality of health. Ayebazibwe had never been to a hospital for medical treatment for her condition citing her limited finances. Further, the swelling was less painful at the beginning but has gradually worsened prompting her to seek medical care. She came to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Nyakibale Hospital and was diagnosed with subcutaneous lipoma that requires removal. However, she is afraid that due to the cost required, she might not receive the treatment. Ayebazibwe is a 47-year-old widow and mother to three children. Her son is a hawker trying to sell small items, and her two daughters are married, practicing small-scale farming. She studied and completed primary seven in school but never proceeded due to lack money for school fees. She stayed at home cultivating crops until she got married when she was 16 years old. She had only spent ten years with her husband by the time of his passing. Her major source of income is from farming where she has a banana and coffee plantation from which she generates a living to sustain her family and help pay school fees for her two grandchildren. However, she is unable to afford the cost of her surgery and appeals for help. Ayebazibwe traveled to our medical partner's care center to receive treatment. On October 6th, surgeons will remove her mass. Now, Ayebazibwe needs help to raise $196 to fund this procedure. Ayebazibwe shared hopefully, “I expect to have a better life and recover from all the pain after a full recovery."

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$196to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Komugisha

Komugisha is a 46-year-old mother of two from Uganda. Her oldest is 21 years old and her youngest is 14 years old and in secondary school. Komugisha is a second wife to her husband who is a casual laborer at national teachers’ college in Uganda. She shared that he offers minimal support to her and their children so Komugisha stays with her parents. In 2006, Komugisha had a c-section delivery for her last born and said that she has been in pain and had challenges since that time. Due to severe pain, she has stopped her usual duties of managing her small bar and hotel and currently stays home feeling helpless, she says. She came to Rushoroza Hospital to seek medical advice. At Rushoroza, Komugisha presented with a long-standing history of lower abdominal pains and reports to have several treatments with no improvement. If not treated, severe lower abdominal pains will continue to affect her quality of life negatively. She has been diagnosed with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease and needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $228 to fund Komugisha's surgery. On October 14th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Komugisha will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and her quality of life will improve. Komugisha says, “I pray that I may get the required treatment soon because I am in severe pain; I can no longer carry out my survival duties normally. Given the opportunity, I will resume my small hotel and bar as soon as possible.”

10% funded

10%funded
$25raised
$203to go