Andrew CrichtonMONTHLY DONOR
Andrew's Story

Andrew joined Watsi on November 15th, 2015. Five years ago, Andrew joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Andrew's most recent donation supported Juvens, a 2-year-old boy from Haiti, to fund brain surgery.

Impact

Andrew has funded healthcare for 64 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Andrew

Titus is a 22-year-old motorcyclist and is the sixth born in a family of nine: six boys and three girls. His father earns wages from farming and working in other people’s farms, while his mother takes care of their house and family. They live in a two-roomed iron-built house in their village. Two months ago, Titus was involved in a road accident. He was riding a motorcycle that lost brake power and fell into a ditch. Titus sustained lacerations on his knee and fractured his right patella, and was rushed to a nearby district hospital where he was sutured and discharged home. Three weeks later, when he tried to stretch his leg, his wound opened and an X-Ray imaging of his leg revealed an open patella fracture. The doctor has recommended open reduction and internal fixation surgery and skin grafting to avoid further complications and further wound infection. Currently, Titus is in pain and has to use a walking frame to get around. His parents have desperately searched for a solution, but their socioeconomic status with the family of many children in school with fees has limited the options of helping Titus. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 13th, Titus will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will relieve him of his pain and he'll be able to use his leg once he recovers. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Titus shared, "My biggest hope is to get an opportunity to be treated so that I can go home to better my life.”

$1,145raised
Fully funded

Susan is a mother of three, with her eldest child now 23 years, and two twins who are 17. She used to work at a salon in Nairobi, but the owner closed the business at the beginning of the year. She has been out of work since then and husband works as a casual laborer in a pharmaceutical firm, which recruits them in intervals depending on the availability of funds. She has applied for national health insurance coverage, but it is not yet approved and her doctors have recommended that she undergoes her surgery as soon as possible. Susan first noted a lump in July so she visited a facility in Nairobi and was treated with pain medication and an ointment. She felt better, but the pain recurred after two months. Due to the pain, she went to a government clinic and was advised to visit a higher-level facility. She opted to visit our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital after a recommendation by a neighbor. However, Susan is not in a financial position to pay for the surgery and is appealing for financial assistance. Susan has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Without treatment, the cancer may spread to other organs. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been suggested to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1110 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Susan. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 6th. After treatment, Susan will hopefully return to a cancer-free life. Susan says, "My family and my kids are my motivation. This lump is just increasing in size and pain. I hope I get the treatment I need.”

$1,110raised
Fully funded

Mu Hee is a 23-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her parents, older brother, sister in-law, three nephews and three nieces in a refugee camp. Mu Hee’s older brother is the sole income earner in their family. He works as a nurse in the camp’s hospital, which is run by International Rescue Committee (IRC). Mu Hee’s parents and her sister in-law look after the household chores. Mu Hee’s nieces and nephews are students and Mu Hee is a Bible school student. Since the outbreak of Covid-19 in March 2020, she has been studying online in the refugee camp. Her teachers support her school fees and food. In her free time, Mu Hee likes to play with her nieces and nephews. She also loves to listen to music and sing. When Mu Hee was 14 years old, she began to experience severe abdominal pain. The first time it occurred, her father called a medic who lived close to their house, and the medic gave her an injection. She felt better after the injection, but continued to feel unwell every month. When she was 15, her father took her to the clinic in the camp to check whether Mu Hee had a serious illness in her abdomen, but the medic could not find any problem. Mu Hee's pain continued and she continued to receive treatment to help, but she did not think that her condition was serious because she had heard from her friends that some women experienced pain during the first day of their period. In early 2020, Mu Hee spoke about this condition with a staff member from a nearby clinic and with one of her teachers. Both urged her to get a check-up, and in February 2020, Mu Hee went to a clinic and a medic found a mass in her left ovary. Doctors have tried to treat her with medications for almost a year, but the mass has continued to grow. During a follow-up appointment in January 2021, the doctor told her that she would need surgery. Recently, Mu Hee has experienced pain in the left side of her lower abdomen almost every day. The pain is on and off and she feels most uncomfortable when running or walking, especially over long distances. She also experiences some pain as she does other basic daily tasks. Mu Hee sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. She is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery, and she is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Mu Hee said, “The first time when I heard that I have a mass in my ovary, I felt very sad. I am also worried that the mass might be cancerous. I think about my condition very often, but my parents are very supportive, and they encourage me not to be afraid. I believe that I will no longer experience pain after surgery.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded