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Success! Joyce from Malawi raised $1,194 to fund a mastectomy to treat breast cancer.

Joyce
100%
  • $1,194 raised, $0 to go
$1,194
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Joyce's treatment was fully funded on November 29, 2022.

Photo of Joyce post-operation

December 13, 2022

Joyce underwent a mastectomy to treat breast cancer..

Joyce underwent a procedure for treatment for breast cancer. All was successful and she headed home from the hospital in a very good condition. Now that her breast has been removed, Joyce hopes to be free from all of her psychological trauma she had experienced and feels she has a chance to lead a normal life. She is grateful for the support offered and says when she fully recovers, she will be able to concentrate on her family and farm.

Joyce says, “Glory be to God for being there for me. Sponsors, thank you very much for coming in when I really needed surgical intervention. Please continue helping many patients who are still suffering at this hospital.”

Joyce underwent a procedure for treatment for breast cancer. All was successful and she headed home from the hospital in a very good conditi...

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September 27, 2022

Joyce is a 54-year-old wife and mother of three. She is a subsistence farmer who grows crops and raises farm animals mainly for food for their family. She lives in a corrugated iron house with her husband and her youngest son. Her oldest son is currently employed and married, but her middle son lost his job due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She proudly shared that her youngest son just sat for the Malawi School Certificate Examination and he is awaiting the results. Joyce’s oldest son helps to pay the school fees for his younger brother because he is the only one currently working in their family.

Last year Joyce noticed a lump on her breast. Her sister advised her to go to Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) where she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Surgery was recommended, but the waiting list for an operation has been too long. A KCH doctor advised her to come to Partners In Hope because her condition needs urgent attention. The Partners in Hope surgeon recommended Joyce get a mastectomy. A mastectomy is a surgery to remove all breast tissue from a breast as a way to treat or prevent breast cancer. Due to her financial status, she was referred to our medical partner African Mission Healthcare and has also contributed $19.40 herself to support her treatment.

Joyce is fearful of what may come next because she has been reading and has learned of the impact of breast cancer on an individual. Hopefully, having the surgery will erase all these fears and allow Joyce to live her normal life again.

Joyce says, “It will be great for me to live a life without a lump on my breast. This thing kills my self-esteem and my hopes to live.”

Joyce is a 54-year-old wife and mother of three. She is a subsistence farmer who grows crops and raises farm animals mainly for food for the...

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Joyce's Timeline

  • September 27, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Joyce was submitted by Beatrice Njoroge, Curative Medical Support Program Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • September 27, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Joyce's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 29, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Joyce received treatment at Partners in Hope Medical Center in Malawi. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 29, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Joyce's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 13, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Joyce's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Treatment
Mastectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,194 for Joyce's treatment
Hospital Fees
$404
Medical Staff
$478
Medication
$8
Supplies
$50
Labs
$93
Other
$161
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Common symptoms of breast cancer include a lump or swelling in all or part of the breast, skin irritation or dimpling, pain, discharge, redness, and thickening of the skin.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If breast cancer is not treated, cancer may spread to other organs, potentially leading to early death. Untreated breast cancer can also lead to pain and infection within the breast.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Breast and cervical cancers are the most common cancers affecting Malawian women. Breast cancer accounts for 8% of the female cancers in Malawi. The data is limited but most findings indicate late-stage presentation which leads to higher mortality as compared to resource-rich settings.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient reports to the hospital, and lab work is done. The following day, the patient goes into the operating room for surgery. The patient stays in the hospital ward for about five days. The surgery is considered a success if the wound heals cleanly. The patient is then discharged from the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment is curative if cancer has not spread widely. Usually, this surgery is not performed if cancer has already spread. Sometimes, doctors are unable to determine if cancer has spread until they perform post-operative lymph node testing.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There are very few side effects or risks if the condition is diagnosed and treated before cancer has spread widely.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In Africa, there is limited capacity to treat breast cancer. Many cancers are diagnosed in advanced stages due to the limited number of diagnostic and treatment centers.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For early-stage breast cancer, a “lumpectomy” surgery may be adequate. Additional radiation therapy will be required for cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

U Eain

When U Eain was 10 years old, he became a monk. Now, at the age of 33, he lives with five other monks in a monastery in Yangon, Burma. As a monk, U Eain doesn't have an income. Instead, every morning, two of the novice monks from his monastery collect food donated by followers in Yangon. In addition, worshipers who visit the monastery donate vegetables, fruits and curries to eat. When the monks preach in other villages, they may receive small cash donations, and when U Eain's parents visit him every year, they provide U Eain with a small amount of money. In this way, the monks are able to cover their basic needs. In February, U Eain went to a town in Mon State to preach. During his second day there, he felt very tired and struggled to breathe, and ultimately, he had to stop preaching. He went to a local clinic, where he received two injections that helped him to feel better. The next day, he returned to his monastery in Yangon. Once he was home, he developed a fever and felt very tired, so he went to a nearby clinic. There, he received an electrocardiogram (ECG). After his results came back, the doctor told him that there were problems with his heart, and U Eain was referred to Yangon Government Hospital for an echocardiogram. On April 19th, U Eain had the echocardiogram, and then brought the results back to the nearby clinic. Due to numerous issues uncovered by the test, U Eain will need cardiac surgery to replace two valves in his heart. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is able to help U Eain access the care that he needs. On October 21st, doctors at Pun Hlaing Hospital will replace the two valves in U Eain's heart, relieving him of the chest pains, rapid heartbeat, fatigue and difficulty breathing that he suffers from now. With his limited income, U Eain needs your support to raise the $1,500 to cover the cost of the procedure. He is hopeful to feel himself again soon and looks forward to returning to preaching and teaching. U Eain said: “I am so happy to receive treatment. I would like to say thank you so much to all of the donors.”

73% funded

73%funded
$1,100raised
$400to go
Foster

Foster is a 70-year-old father of nine, from Makwenda Village in Malawi. He lives with his wife and grandchildren. To support his family, he solely depends on farming where he grows maize, groundnuts, and soya beans. Foster is a village headman and he is a member of the Church of African Presbytery. Foster was well until 2020 when he noticed a swelling on the right side of his groin. The swelling was very painful and made passing stool and urine very difficult. The swelling would disappear and reappear after a while, especially when it is cold, and when he coughs or strains himself. Foster decided to seek medical help at a health center in his area where he was referred to Nkhoma Hospital, but at the time surgeries were limited due to the coronavirus pandemic. He was told to come back another time. As the condition persisted, Foster went to seek medical help at Dedza District Hospital where he has been visiting up to now and had been given pain medication. Last week, Foster visited Nkhoma Hospital once again, and he presented that the swelling has now been appearing on both sides. After assessment in the surgical clinic, Foster was diagnosed with Bilateral Inguinal Hernia. The doctor advised that he needs to undergo Hernia Repair surgical procedure and this was scheduled for October 5th. This hernia condition has impacted Foster’s life negatively. Since the condition surfaced, he experiences pain that hinders him from doing his daily activities and he fails to work on his farm. Additionally, he cannot walk a long distance or ride his bike as the swelling appears when he strains himself. Treatment will be a welcome development in Foster’s life. He will be able to work on his farm and continue taking care of his family as he is the sole breadwinner. In addition to that, treatment will prevent Foster from developing complications that a hernia can cause, such as enlargement, incarceration, small bowel obstruction, and strangulation of the hernia, which can be fatal. Foster shared that he does not have enough money to pay for his surgery and other expenses so the medical team referred him to Watsi and our medical partner African Mission healthcare. He has been able to contribute $15 to his care and our medical partner is requesting $500 to cover the cost of Foster's surgery. Foster says, “I was afraid that this condition will start affecting my duties as a village headman, I am thankful that there is hope for me through my donors.”

56% funded

56%funded
$280raised
$220to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

U Eain

When U Eain was 10 years old, he became a monk. Now, at the age of 33, he lives with five other monks in a monastery in Yangon, Burma. As a monk, U Eain doesn't have an income. Instead, every morning, two of the novice monks from his monastery collect food donated by followers in Yangon. In addition, worshipers who visit the monastery donate vegetables, fruits and curries to eat. When the monks preach in other villages, they may receive small cash donations, and when U Eain's parents visit him every year, they provide U Eain with a small amount of money. In this way, the monks are able to cover their basic needs. In February, U Eain went to a town in Mon State to preach. During his second day there, he felt very tired and struggled to breathe, and ultimately, he had to stop preaching. He went to a local clinic, where he received two injections that helped him to feel better. The next day, he returned to his monastery in Yangon. Once he was home, he developed a fever and felt very tired, so he went to a nearby clinic. There, he received an electrocardiogram (ECG). After his results came back, the doctor told him that there were problems with his heart, and U Eain was referred to Yangon Government Hospital for an echocardiogram. On April 19th, U Eain had the echocardiogram, and then brought the results back to the nearby clinic. Due to numerous issues uncovered by the test, U Eain will need cardiac surgery to replace two valves in his heart. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is able to help U Eain access the care that he needs. On October 21st, doctors at Pun Hlaing Hospital will replace the two valves in U Eain's heart, relieving him of the chest pains, rapid heartbeat, fatigue and difficulty breathing that he suffers from now. With his limited income, U Eain needs your support to raise the $1,500 to cover the cost of the procedure. He is hopeful to feel himself again soon and looks forward to returning to preaching and teaching. U Eain said: “I am so happy to receive treatment. I would like to say thank you so much to all of the donors.”

73% funded

73%funded
$1,100raised
$400to go