Andre PerssonMONTHLY DONOR
Andre's Story

Andre joined Watsi on October 27th, 2020. One year ago, Andre joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Andre's most recent donation supported Rosaline, a mother from Kenya, to fund hysterectomy surgery and improve her life.

Impact

Andre has funded healthcare for 14 patients in 5 countries.

All patients funded by Andre

Letina is a bright sixteen-year-old student. He's from a large family with ten children with Letina being one of the oldest. At school, Letina's best subjects are math, Swahili, and social studies. He is a hard-working student and helps look after his father's cattle when he is not studying. About three years ago, Letina's legs began curving as he grew. At first, it was a slight curve but has worsened over the years. As a result, Letina has had to stop his studies in search of treatment for his legs. Due to the family's limited income, they could not previously seek treatment for their son. Letina visited our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), where he was diagnosed with bilateral valgus, a condition in which the bone joint is angled outward away from the body's midline. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, walking is painful and near impossible. Letina shared he is now unable to walk a long distance and feels pain when he does walk. On October 26th, Letina will undergo corrective surgery. Treatment should help restore Letina's mobility, allow him to participate in various activities, and significantly decrease his risk of future complications. AMH is requesting $880 to help fund Letina's surgery. Letina shared, "Walking has become very hard for me due to pain and how deformed my legs are. My friends have been making fun of me at school."

72%funded
$640raised
$240to go

Benjamin is a father of a four-year-old child who works as a motorbike (boda-boda) driver, earning about $3.70USD per day. His income is also inconsistent and depends on the availability of customers. He is the sole breadwinner for his family. Unfortunately, he has no active medical insurance coverage and has had to rely on relatives and friends to settle hospital bills. Benjamin is full of smiles but finds it difficult to sit up while sharing his story. He opts to talk while lying flat on his back. Benjamin is currently immobile, unable to sit and walk, as a result of a road traffic accident from the beginning of the month. When the 25-year-old hitched a ride on his friend's water truck, the vehicle lost control and he was thrown out the window. He immediately experienced severe back pain and lost consciousness. The accident left Benjamin with multiple fractures and wounds that will require several fracture repair and spine surgeries in order for him to sit, walk, and be able to continue with his normal routine roles again. After stays at various hospitals and numerous referrals, Benjamin arrived at our medical partner's care center, Kijabe Hospital, for care on July 17th. One of the obstacles to treatment he had faced at other hospitals was a long waiting list that meant a delay in much-needed care, but fortunately Kijabe is able to offer his needed care more urgently. At Kijabe Hospital, the doctors recommended a spinal fusion procedure for him to help regain his mobility. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $1,500 for Benjamin's critical surgery, scheduled to take place on July 26th. Benjamin shares, “I just sleep on my back and cannot even sit or walk. I cannot work and fend for my family. I need this surgery to get back to my Boda-boda job and raise my family."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Ngoitumet is a 6-year-old boy and the last born in a family of three children. Despite his legs condition and his difficulty with walking, Ngoitumet is a friendly and jovial boy. If not for his health condition, he would be running around enjoying his playtime and be more involved in daily home activities. Ngoitmet’s father is elderly with no source of income. He was not able to bring Ngoitumet to the hospital and had to be helped by a neighbor. Ngoitumet's family depends on livestock keeping and the milk they get from their cattle to make ends meet. Ngoitumet was diagnosed with "windswept" knees, a condition that started when he was two years old when his father noticed his left leg was slightly curving outward. His father couldn’t take him to the hospital for treatment due to financial challenges, so his left leg kept worsening, and the right leg also began curving inward. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. Due to his condition, Ngoitumet has not had a chance to join school yet. He is no longer able to take part in daily home activities, like grazing their father’s cattle. Ngoitumet undergoes a lot of pain when he walks over a long distance. Through their church and the outreach program at Plaster House, Ngoitumet's family was referred to seek treatment. He has been scheduled for surgery to help correct both of his legs. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Ngoitumet. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 20th. Treatment will hopefully restore Ngoitumet's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Ngoitumet’s neighbour shared, "Please help this boy as he is having a hard time standing and walking and his parents do not have money to seek treatment for him."

$880raised
Fully funded

Say is a four-year-old boy who lives with his mother, brother, sister, and grandfather in a refugee camp on the border of Thailand. His father returned to Burma to visit his village last year. When Thailand closed its borders because of the COVID-19 outbreak, his father could not come back to the camp. Say's grandfather is an assistant pastor in the camp and he receives his income through donations when he visits his church members for home prayers. Say goes to nursery school while both of his siblings go to primary school. His mother does all the household chores. Every month, their household receives some funding to purchase rations in the camp, which is just enough for their basic needs. They receive free healthcare and education in the camp, but specialized procedures like the care that Say needs are often not possible. In early February 2021, Say developed an inguinal hernia on his right side, which has resulted in swelling and pain. His mother has noticed that since he developed the hernia, his appetite has decreased, as eating more can sometimes cause additional discomfort. Fortunately, on March 25th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Say's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 25th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Say's mother said, "When I heard that my son needs surgery, I became so worried because he is the youngest in our family." She is eager for the surgery to be complete and for Say to have healed.

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Scholastica is a 6-month-old baby girl from Tanzania. She is the last born in a family of six children. Scholastica was born a healthy child but, at four months of age, her mother noticed her head was growing very fast and she was not able to support it. They could not afford the cost of seeking care at the regional hospital at the time. Scholastica's parents are small scale farmers and work hard to make ends meet with their income. Eventually, they were able to get some money from relatives and took her back to the regional hospital. There, Scholastica was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. Without treatment, Scholastica will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Unfortunately, she was not able to get an appointment at the regional hospital for a long time. As time went on, Scholastica's condition grew worse. Her head increased in size and her eyes began rolling down. Though they were concerned, her parents could not raise money to seek an alternative hospital for care. Eventually, their friend referred them to our medical partner's care center, ALMC Plaster House. Their friends and neighbours supported them with bus fare for the two-day journey to the hospital. Now, she is scheduled for an ETV surgery to treat her condition, and the family appeals for financial support for this procedure. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of ETV surgery for Scholastica that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 25th and will drain the excess fluid from Scholastica's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. It will also reduce the likelihood of severe fevers, vomiting, and potential brain damage. With proper treatment, Scholastica will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Scholastica’s mother shared, "We travelled for two days because we were told there is hope for my daughter to get help. Please help save her.”

$1,300raised
Fully funded