Mary-Lynn CesarUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
Mary-Lynn's Story

Mary-Lynn joined Watsi on January 13th, 2017. Six years ago, Mary-Lynn joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Mary-Lynn's most recent donation supported Ronan, a 24-year-old kitchen worker from Philippines, to fund corrective surgery.

Impact

Mary-Lynn has funded healthcare for 77 patients in 11 countries.

Patients funded by Mary-Lynn

Aung is a nine months old baby boy from Burma. He lives with his parents, grandparents, aunt, uncle, and two elder sisters. His father works as a day laborer, while his mother takes care of the household. They also run a small farm where they grow rice for both their family to eat and to earn an income. However, their monthly earning is insufficient to cover their basic living costs and Aung's medical expenses. As a result, they are indebted. Aung was born at home with the assistance of a midwife. Neither the midwife nor the mother noticed any abnormalities at that time. However, the day after his birth, Aung's grandmother observed swelling in his left foot and genitals, as well as a mass on his right flank. Last May, Aung and his mother sought treatment at the public hospital in Yangon, where he was admitted. There, he underwent tests, including hormone evaluations, along with multiple X-rays of his chest, abdomen, pelvis, and both legs. The doctor informed his mother that a rare congenital condition was suspected, and that amputation might be necessary if there were any changes in his leg color or when he reached six months of age to prevent complications. Oral medications and bi-weekly follow-up appointments were provided. Over time, Aung's leg and scrotum swelling worsened. However, due to ongoing conflict near their village and financial constraints, Aung's parents were unable to attend further follow-up appointments. Doctors now want Aung to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $968 to cover the cost of Aung's MRI and care, scheduled for January 26th. Aung's mother expressed, "I hope to witness my son's full recovery. His condition brings me immense sorrow, and I do not know why this has happened to him. I would like to extend my heartfelt gratitude to BCMF and the donors for helping my son. Once he receives complete treatment, my wish is for him to excel in his education and achieve success in life."

$526raised
$442to go

Jecinta is a delightful 4-year-old girl from Kenya. She is playful and jovial. Born with a birth condition her journey began at Kiambu Hospital, where dedicated healthcare professionals initiated a treatment plan to address the condition. She was prescribed braces as part of her comprehensive care to correct her clubfeet. With the support of her mother, she embarked on a hopeful journey towards improved mobility and a future filled with possibilities. The braces played a role in maintaining the corrections achieved through casting and other interventions. However, along the way, and because of the hardships, Jecinta, like many children, faced challenges in using the braces. Unfortunately, she lost to follow-up at Kiambu Hospital, and the regular monitoring and follow-up appointments ended. Over more than a year with no follow-up, Jecintas deformity recurred. Currently she tiptoes as she walks and feels pain. Fortunately, Jecinta and her mother traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, AIC Cure International Hospital. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,286 to fund Jecinta's clubfoot repair. After treatment, she be able to walk well, with no pain and discomfort. Her self-esteem will also improve, and she will continue with her education without any hardship. “I will appreciate if consider my daughter to undergo surgery so that she can stand on her feet and walk confidently like other children,” Glory, Jecinta’s mother, told us.

$1,286raised
Fully funded

Asiyatu is a married mother of two children aged 8 and 3 years. Her first child is in 3rd grade and the youngest is in nursery school. She is a homemakerwhile her husband is an Airtel money branch manager earning about $208.72 per month from his business and he takes care of all the bills at home. They live in a three-bedroomed rented house costing $29.82 per month. Asiyatu likes chatting with her children and enjoys eating chips and vegetables. Asiyatu was well until 2020 after the delivery of her second child when she noted a small lump on her left breast that was not painful. She visited a nearby hospital but did not receive help. The husband took her to Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) after noting that the lump was getting bigger as time passed. She was brought to Partners in Hope Medical Center (PIH) for a lumpectomy which is a surgery that removes cancer from the breast through the removal of a tumor and a small rim of normal tissues around it, and a sample was sent for histology. In September, she reported back to PIH for histology results that revealed an Invasive Breast Carcinoma requiring a mastectomy. She was then referred back to KCH for surgery since the husband could no longer manage to pay for the surgery as he did with the previous one. She was scheduled for surgery the next year. Lately, Asiyatu has been experiencing needle-pricking pain that is becoming unbearable without pain-relieving medications, affecting her household chores. As a result of her pain, her husband took her back to the hospital in November for support where she was then referred back to PIH for urgent surgery seeking support under the Watsi program. Doctors at PIH confirmed the need for a modified radical mastectomy, a surgery. Their family is able to commit $89.45 to support her care and their family is raising the remaining funds. Asiyatu believes the surgical operation will help her get back home in good condition and continue taking care of her children and her caring husband. Asiyatu said, “I am ready to live with one breast as I hope to get rid of all my pains and have my perfect life back again.”

$1,194raised
Fully funded

55-year-old Leonida lives with her partner and her son in the Philippines. She is a vegetable vendor, while her partner works as a part-time tricycle driver. In 2022, Leonida began to experience troubling symptoms, including easy fatigability and abdominal pain. Despite the discomfort of living with these symptoms, she was reluctant to seek medical attention due to financial constraints. However, as her symptoms worsened, she was compelled to consult a doctor. After undergoing some tests, she was diagnosed with chronic calculous cholecystitis- an inflamed gallbladder, complicated by gallstones. Leonida has been advised to undergo a cholecystectomy, the surgical removal of the gallbladder. If her condition is left untreated, her symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, World Surgical Foundation Philippines (WSFP), Leonida is scheduled to undergo a cholecystectomy on April 18th, at Our Lady of Peace Hospital. A portion of the cost of the procedure is being supported by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation, but Leonida and her family need help to raise the remaining $1,128 to cover the cost of Leonida's surgery and care. Leonida said: "Whenever the pain attacks, it would last for a week, and I had nothing else to do but to put up with it since we're poor and can't afford the treatment. This free surgery is truly helpful to me. To WATSI and World Surgical Foundation Philippines, I can't thank you enough for your generosity. May you continue helping people like me."

$1,128raised
Fully funded

34-year-old Beatrice lives with her husband and four children in Malawi. Beatrice uses the income from the saloon that she owns to take care of the needs of her children. Her husband, who is a businessman, uses his income to take care of their home, a three-bedroom house that has neither running water nor electricity. In 2020, some of Beatrice's friends noticed a swelling in her neck. Beatrice- who was pregnant at the time- went to the hospital to be evaluated. She was told that the swelling might be related to her pregnancy and that she should come back after giving birth if the swelling hadn't subsided. The swelling continued to grow; ultimately, Beatrice was diagnosed with a goiter- a swelling of the thyroid gland- and told that she would need to have her thyroid surgically removed. Beatrice's surgery continued to be postponed, but her symptoms of breathlessness and coughing- which often kept her from going to work- continued to worsen. Finally, her sister suggested that she visit Partners in Hope Medical Center, where doctors scheduled her for surgery on January 31st. As Beatrice is unable to cover the costs of her treatment, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is seeking $1,015 to fund Beatrice's thyroidectomy. Beatrice believes the removal of her thyroid will help her to return to her home in Blantyre, and to rejoin her family in good health. She believes her children are the reason why she lives, and she knows that she has to be healthy in order to continue supporting them. Beatrice said: “I am looking forward to getting back to normal.”

$1,015raised
Fully funded

Saw Myo is a 14-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his grandparents, parents, two sisters and a brother in a village in Karen State in eastern Burma. His grandparents are retired, and his father is a farmer who grows paddy and rubber trees on their own land. Saw Myo’s mother is a homemaker, while his two sisters and his brother go to school. The family income is just enough to cover their daily expenses. They cannot afford to pay for basic healthcare. Saw Myo used to go to school but stopped attending since his condition worsened in 2021. Saw Myo has had a lump at his lower spinal cord since he was nine years old, when he was hit by a slingshot in that area. He was given a medicinal ointment by a traditional healer which appeared to stop the lump from growing and helped with the stiffness temporarily. When Saw Myo was 12 years old, he fell off of his bicycle. He did not have any cuts or bruises but felt stiffness along his spinal cord. Afterwards, the lump appeared to be growing in size again. He was seen at a local clinic and then at a clinic in Hpa-An in January 2021, where he had an X-ray. The doctor suspected a spinal cord problem, so they encouraged Saw Myo and his mother to follow up with a computerized tomography (CT) scan at the Yangon Orthopedic Hospital in Yangon. Due to Covid-19, Saw Myo was unable to get in for a CT scan. Saw Myo’s parents did not want to give up, so they went to the Asia Royal Hospital, also in Yangon. Again, they were told that Saw Myo’s condition could not be treated locally. Finally, they returned to their home without receiving treatment. Saw Myo’s mother then contacted a medic who works at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Mae Sot, Thailand, who is originally from their village. The medic told her to bring Saw Myo to the clinic as soon as possible. They spent the next few months trying to raise money, borrowing from family and neighbours. Doctors recommended Saw Myo to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. After analyzing the MRI, the doctors recommended Saw Myo undergo surgery to remove the tumor on his back. The tumor is cancerous, and Saw Myo will need to undergo chemotherapy after his surgery. Currently, Saw Myo is suffering a lot. He has to be careful when sitting because his whole back along his spinal cord is painful if he does not sit down slowly, and he can only sit for short periods of time before his back begins to ache. The lump is not painful to touch, but when he lays down on his right side, he has to support the lump with a pillow, making it difficult for him to sleep. He also has backpain if he has to walk for more than 15 minutes. Saw Myo sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. He is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on November 24th and his family needs $1,500 to cover the cost of his procedure and care. Saw Myo said, "I enjoy going to school and my favourite subject is mathematics. I hope that I will be able to go to school after my treatment. I would also like to raise chickens and cows to help my family in the future."

$1,500raised
Fully funded