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Dorn is a 37-year-old man from Cambodia who needs $572 to fund shoulder surgery so he can use his arm again.

Dorn
29%
  • $166 raised, $406 to go
$166
raised
$406
to go
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June 6, 2022

Dorn is a 37-year-old farmer from an agricultural region in southern Cambodia. Dorn and his wife have two daughters, a 10-year-old and 3-year-old. Dorn’s wife is a garment factory worker in Phnom Penh. In his free time, Dorn enjoys playing with his daughters and meeting friends for coffee.

Since he was a child, Dorn has had problems with his left elbow. Dorn has been treated by Khmer traditional healers, but his pain has increased over the last year. Dorn suffers from numbness in his left arm and experiences ulnar nerve palsy. As a result, Dorn cannot work at all with his left hand. This makes it very difficult to farm and feed his cattle.

A neighbor suggested Dorn visit our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), for diagnosis and treatment. Dorn was diagnosed with a transposition of his nerves and specialty surgeons plan to do an ulnar nerve exploration on June 6th to help him finally heal. CSC is raising $572 to cover Dorn’s procedure.

Dorn shared, “After surgery, I hope my left hand can get better, with no more numbness, and I can work without pain. This treatment will help me in the future to return to work.”

Dorn is a 37-year-old farmer from an agricultural region in southern Cambodia. Dorn and his wife have two daughters, a 10-year-old and 3-yea...

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Dorn's Timeline

  • June 6, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Dorn was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • June 6, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Dorn was scheduled to receive treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • June 9, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Dorn's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Dorn is currently raising funds for his treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Dorn's treatment update from Children's Surgical Centre.

Funded by 5 donors

Funded by 5 donors

Treatment
Nerve and Tendon Repair
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $572 for Dorn's treatment
Hospital Fees
$92
Medical Staff
$429
Medication
$0
Supplies
$43
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A number of nerve and tendon procedures are performed at Children's Surgical Centre. These are typically performed because a nerve is no longer fully functional. Reasons for this limited functionality can include lacerations, blunt trauma, burns, and tumors. Sometimes, spinal nerves are compressed due to herniated discs, bone spurs, and tumors.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The patient cannot work or drive a motorbike, the most common form of transportation in Cambodia.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Traffic accidents, common in Cambodia, are the most typical cause of a brachial plexus injury (BPI), or damage to a network of nerves on the neck and shoulders. The inability to use a limb is debilitating for patients, whose livelihoods involve physical activity. They are often farmers, factory workers, or drivers.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

When a nerve no longer functions, the muscle that it innervates no longer functions. Surgeons either repair that nerve or use a nerve from somewhere else in the body to act as a graft. In some cases, a nerve can be redirected from a less important muscle and grafted into a more critical nerve. During a BPI surgery, surgeons divert a nerve from one destination and sew it into the non-functioning nerve. It can take three to six months before a patient fully recovers from this operation.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The patient will regain function in his or her arm. The patient can drive a motorbike and go back to work.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This surgery is highly effective. The nerve is already damaged, so there is no risk of causing more harm. The surgery can only improve function.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

This surgery is not available to most Cambodians. Patients travel up to twelve hours to visit Children's Surgical Centre (CSC). They learn about CSC from the radio, a neighbor, or a family member.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternative treatments to regain limb functionality.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Thein

Thein is a 42-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her husband, son, daughter, mother-in-law and step-granddaughter in Palu Village, Myawaddy Township, Karen State, Burma. Thein’s husband is still recovering from an illness and is also looking after her as her caregiver. Her mother-in-law has impaired vision and is looked after by her children. Her two children stopped going to school in 2020, when schools closed due to COVID-19. After the coup in February 2021, their school never reopened. Thein works as a day laborer and as a farmer, but she has not been able to plant anything this year. In December 2021, she and her family had to flee their village for a month due to armed clashes in their village. After they were able to return, Thein was too scared to go to her farmland since she had been told that the area around the village is full of landmines. It has been a very difficult time for their family as Thein’s house was also destroyed during the armed clashes in their village. They are currently living with Thein’s mother-in-law, whose house partially survived the recent violence and destruction. Thein's family currently lives off of donations that Palu villagers receive as internally displaced peoples (IDPs), and the rice they harvested last year before they had to flee. Since July 2021, Thein has been experiencing backpain when she sits or lays down. She feels better when she is standing or walking. After she eats, she feels bloated and uncomfortable. She has been diagnosed with large abdominal endometriosis. She has been advised to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy, the surgical removal of her uterus and cervix. If left untreated, Thein's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. Fortunately, Thein is scheduled to undergo her hysterectomy on July 20th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered she will no longer be in pain and will be able to sit and lie down comfortably. Despite the hard moment they are in, Thein tries to stay hopeful about rebuilding her life: “When I recover fully, I want to go back to work so that I can earn money. I want to rebuild my house and live there with my family.”

65% funded

65%funded
$977raised
$523to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.