William J. HoranUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
William's Story

William joined Watsi on October 17th, 2019. Three years ago, William joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. William's most recent donation supported Sobel, a 21-year-old engineer from Cambodia, to fund arm nerve surgery.

Impact

William has funded healthcare for 52 patients in 9 countries.

Patients funded by William

Sobel is an unemployed 21-year-old who lives in Phnom Penh province with six other members of his family - his father and five siblings who all live together at home. His father is retired. Before his injury, Sobel had an engineering job and enjoyed playing volleyball with friends. In July 2023, on his way home from work, Sobel's motorcycle skidded on the rain-soaked surface, sending him crashing onto the pavement. He lost consciousness for several hours. His sister took him to a local hospital with a skull fracture, broken collarbone, and broken upper arm. He has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on his left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. Sobel is unable to lift his shoulder or hand, consequently stripping away his ability to work. The thought of navigating life with only one arm is hard for him to imagine. Sobel traveled to Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre to receive treatment. This is the only center in the whole country where this treatment is available. On January 2nd, he will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, he hopes to restore function in his arm and hand and find a job to help his family. Our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre, is requesting $709 to fund this procedure. Sobel said: "I want to work like before and hope the surgeons can help me."

$709raised
Fully funded

Mabasa is a four-year-old child from Tanzania. Like any other child, he is filled with dreams, curiosity, and a boundless spirit. He comes from a mid-sized family with five siblings. However, his journey has taken an unexpected turn that threatens to overshadow his bright future. Born to hardworking farming parents, Mabasa was a healthy and joyful baby. Yet, at age two, he began to experience a troubling transformation that has left his family deeply concerned. Mabasa’s parents, dedicated farmers who work relentlessly to provide for their family, noticed something amiss when their son’s legs started to bend as he took his first steps. This struck them with concern and fear. The condition worsened as months passed, casting a shadow of uncertainty over their child’s future. Mabasa was diagnosed with left genu valgus. Colloquially known as "knock-knee," genu valgum is a condition in which the knees bend inward, and can cause pain, difficulty walking, and arthritis. Mabasa's left leg has curved inward, affecting his mobility. To their dismay, the doctors could find no apparent cause for Mabasa’s condition and suggested a healthy nutrition regimen and medications to improve his overall health. Mabasa’s parents followed these recommendations, but despite their unwavering efforts, there was no sign of improvement. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Mabasa. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 14th. Treatment will hopefully restore Mabasa's mobility, allowing him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Mabasa’s father says, “I wish for my son to have a bright future and that this condition won’t be a problem in the future.”

$880raised
Fully funded

Oliver is a married mother of four children, all of whom are married with children except the last one who is still in school. She is a farmer together with her husband. Her second child, a daughter, has been there for her support throughout her illness. Oliver likes chatting with her daughter and enjoys eating nsima made from cassava maize flour served with fresh fish. Oliver was well until one year ago when she noted a small lump on her right breast that was not painful. She visited her nearest hospital where some pain medication was provided. She visited many other hospitals after noting that the growth was becoming bigger as time passed. At one of the hospitals, a diagnosis of suspected breast cancer was made before proceeding to Kamuzu Central Hospital for further assessments. At Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH), different tests were done, and a diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma was made followed by four cycles of neoadjuvant therapy. Oliver was later scheduled for surgery on January 15th this year but unfortunately, she did not report back since she did not have the funds. On January 29th, Oliver went back to KCH where she was referred to our medical partner's care center Partners in Hope Medical Center (PIH) so that she can undergo surgery more urgently. Of late, Oliver has been experiencing needle pricking pains, and weakness affecting her farm work plus household chores as a mother. On January 30th, Oliver reported to PIH and met the surgeon who confirmed the need for a modified radical mastectomy. Modified radical mastectomy is the removal of the entire breast, including the nipple, areola, and skin plus most axillary lymph nodes. Oliver believes the surgical operation will help her get back home in a good condition and enable her to resume her farm work. Oliver said, “Kindly remove this breast for me to have my peace of mind after getting rid of these bad symptoms that I experience, I would rather be able to move on in my age.”

$484raised
$710to go

Aung, who is 25 years old, lives with his mother, brother and two sisters in Burma. His mother is retired, and his brother is a security guard. One of his sisters works at a bicycle factory, while the other one works for a local company. Aung is currently unemployed because of his poor health. In October 2022, Aung fell ill and developed a persistent cough. He went to a charity hospital, where he was told that he had a heart infection. After he was treated with injected antibiotics, the doctor told him that he needed an echocardiogram, because he might have a heart condition due to the infection. After the echo was completed, he was diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation, and he was referred to a cardiologist in Yangon. Aung went to see the cardiologist, who told him that he would need surgery, which he could not afford. On December 25, 2022, both of Aung's legs and his arms became swollen, and he was unable to sleep. He went to a private hospital, where it was determined that he would need surgery as soon as possible. Currently, Aung feels extremely fatigued, experiences chest pains, and has difficulty breathing. Sometimes, his legs and his arms become swollen, and he cannot sleep well at night. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 for the mitral valve replacement surgery that Aung needs. The procedure is currently scheduled to take place on April 2nd, at Pun Hlaing Hospital. "In the future, I want to work as a taxi driver, because I believe that I could easily earn money doing this [in the city]," said Aung.

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Victoria is a three-year-old girl from Kenya. Victoria is a cheerful, playful girl, who has been raised by her aunties. When she reached walking age, she could not walk. This prompted her family to seek medical attention at a public hospital near their hometown. They were referred to the Provincial General Hospital in Nakuru County, Kenya. Several tests were done, but financial constraints prevented them from returning for the test results. Victoria's medical treatment was further delayed when a relative who was actively supporting and raising her became ill, and all available finances were directed toward their treatment. Recently, Victoria's guardian, who was visiting her grandmother, was advised to seek medical care at BethanyKids. Victoria has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of her condition, Victoria has been experiencing a visibly enlarged head size. Without treatment, Victoria will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $720 to cover the cost of surgery for Victoria that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 8th and will drain the excess fluid from Victoria's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Victoria will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Victoria’s aunty says, “This kid is active but unable to support herself because of the condition. She needs this treatment to be able to lead a normal life.”

$720raised
Fully funded