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Success! Agatha from Kenya raised $816 to fund a mastectomy.

Agatha
100%
  • $816 raised, $0 to go
$816
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Agatha's treatment was fully funded on December 4, 2020.

Photo of Agatha post-operation

May 27, 2020

Agatha underwent a mastectomy.

Agatha’s surgery was successfully completed by the medical team at Kijabe Hospital. She spent two days in the hospital after surgery and has recovered well. She will return for a weekly follow-up to review her recovery progress and provide further clinical advice. The surgery greatly reduced the chances of cancer metastasis and Agatha is grateful for the support.

Agatha told us, “Thank you for your kind support. We are grateful. God bless you.”

Agatha’s surgery was successfully completed by the medical team at Kijabe Hospital. She spent two days in the hospital after surgery and has...

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March 25, 2020

Agatha is a peasant farmer from Kenya. She is a mother of five children. Together with her husband, they tend to their small ancestral land to provide for their children.

She noted a small lump on her left breast in January 2020. The lump did not go away and she thought of visiting the hospital. She went to two facilities where she had mammogram and FNA tests done. That was followed up with a biopsy and she had a cancer diagnosis.

Agatha decided to come to Watsi’s Medical Partner’s Kijabe Hospital where doctors have advised that she needs a mastectomy. With the right and timely treatment, Agatha will be out of risk of cancer metastasis. Without treatment, the cancer may spread to other organs. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been suggested to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing.

Agatha has now registered for the national insurance scheme, but it is not yet available. Their monthly income is negligible to meet the cost of surgery.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $816 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Agatha. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 30th. After treatment, Agatha will hopefully return to a cancer-free life.

Agatha says, “My prayer is to be free from this cancer problem. I am hopeful that the treatment will be a success.”

Agatha is a peasant farmer from Kenya. She is a mother of five children. Together with her husband, they tend to their small ancestral land ...

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Agatha's Timeline

  • March 25, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Agatha was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • March 26, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Agatha's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 30, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Agatha received treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 27, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Agatha's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 4, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Agatha's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 17 donors

Funded by 17 donors

Treatment
Mastectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $816 for Agatha's treatment
Hospital Fees
$763
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$5
Supplies
$0
Labs
$9
Other
$39
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A mastectomy is a surgery to remove the breast or part of the breast and is usually performed to treat breast cancer. Common symptoms of breast cancer include a lump or swelling in all or part of the breast, skin irritation or dimpling, pain, discharge, redness, and thickening of the skin.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If breast cancer is not treated, the cancer may spread to other organs, potentially leading to early death. Untreated breast cancer can also lead to pain and infection within the breast.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Breast cancer is the leading cancer in women in Kenya (34 per 100,000). It has been identified as the number one killer of women aged 35-55 years. Late diagnosis is the main reason for high mortality.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient reports to the hospital, and lab work is done. The following day, the patient goes into the operating room for surgery. The patient stays in the hospital ward for three to seven days. The surgery is considered a success if the wound heals cleanly. The patient is then discharged from the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment is curative if the cancer has not spread widely. Usually, this surgery is not performed if the cancer has already spread. Sometimes, doctors are unable to determine if the cancer has spread until they perform post-operative lymph node testing.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There are very few side effects or risks if the condition is diagnosed and treated before the cancer has spread widely.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In Africa, there is limited capacity to treat breast cancer. Many cancers are diagnosed in advanced stages due to the limited number of diagnostic and treatment centers.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For early-stage breast cancer, a “lumpectomy” surgery may be adequate. Additional radiation therapy will be required for cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Simon

Simon is a ten-year-old boy and is the fifth of seven children. Simon and his siblings are being raised by their widowed mother. Though they do not have a farm, Simon's mother has received some support from their village church and has been able to start a small business of selling sugar, tea leaves, salt, and little snacks like doughnuts to be able to support and provide for her children. Recently, Simon was diagnosed with a bone condition called right valgus. During year seven at school, he fell ill from a bacterial infection and was bedridden for a long time. His mother tried to use traditional herbal medication which didn't help with the condition. Simon's infection continued to get worse, and as his mother began to worry he might die, the church helped to pay for medical treatment so he could recover fully. When he was strong enough to get out of bed and walk, his mother noticed his leg was not straight, but she thought it was because of the long period he had been in bed not walking. Over time, his leg has worsened, making walking difficult for him. As a result, Simon is unable to get around or attend to his normal daily activities with ease. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Simon. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 20th. Treatment will hopefully restore Simon's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Simon’s mother asks, "Please help my son."

93% funded

93%funded
$819raised
$61to go
Rosemary

Rosemary is a 55-year-old woman, who is a very cheerful, talkative, and full of humour. Rosemary has a small kiosk where she sells beauty products. In recent years, she has been supporting her sick mother until her mother passed away last year. Early February 2020, Rosemary started experiencing some pain in her abdominal area. The pain became severe, and persisted for some time before she went to a hospital for a checkup. During the examination, she was found to have helicobacter pylori and gallbladder problems, and was also suspected to have gallbladder stones. Rosemary was given medication, which seemed to work at first but her gall bladder problems eventually worsened. Afterwards, Rosemary was referred to another facility in Nairobi for further treatment, but after going through scans and treatment, she did not notice any change in her condition. Eventually, she came to our Medical Partner Kijabe Hospital in February 2021. After the examination, the doctor recommended that she undergo a curative laparatomy to better treat her condition. However, Rosemary cannot afford the cost of her care. While supporting her mother, she found herself in a lot of debt that she is still trying to clear. Rosemary does not have National Health Insurance Fund coverage, and her condition needs urgent treatment. Rosemary has no extra source of income and is appealing for financial help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On March 31st, Rosemary will undergo a laparoscopic cholecystectomy to treat her persistent pain. Once recovered, she will hopefully be free of pain and her quality of life will significantly improve. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $616 to fund this procedure. Rosemary shared, “The financial situation I'm in makes it hard for me to raise enough funds for my surgery yet it is worsening as time goes by. Any financial help offered will be highly appreciated."

72% funded

72%funded
$448raised
$168to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.