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Success! Akankunda from Uganda raised $187 to fund a mass removal procedure.

Akankunda
100%
  • $187 raised, $0 to go
$187
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Akankunda's treatment was fully funded on January 26, 2019.

Photo of Akankunda post-operation

February 5, 2019

Akankunda underwent a mass removal procedure.

She can walk comfortably now, and her quality of life will improve.

Her mother says, “I am so appreciative for the offer given to my daughter surely I cannot take it for granted because I had no money to do all that was needed for her recovery. She will continue with school as she recovers completely and I too continue with cultivation.”

She can walk comfortably now, and her quality of life will improve. Her mother says, “I am so appreciative for the offer given to my dau...

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January 7, 2019

Akankunda is a child from Uganda. She is in nursery school and has two siblings. Akankunda’s parents practice small-scale farming.

Akankunda has had a swelling on her left leg since birth. She experiences discomfort as the mass keeps increasing in size.

Akankunda traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On January 8, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Akankunda needs help to raise $187 to fund this procedure.

Her mother says, “I will be very grateful that my daughter will be treated. I will have peace of mind after surgery.”

Akankunda is a child from Uganda. She is in nursery school and has two siblings. Akankunda’s parents practice small-scale farming. Akank...

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Akankunda's Timeline

  • January 7, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Akankunda was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • January 7, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Akankunda's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 8, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Akankunda received treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 26, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Akankunda's treatment was fully funded.

  • February 5, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Akankunda's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 4 donors

Funded by 4 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $187 for Akankunda's treatment
Hospital Fees
$96
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$29
Supplies
$28
Labs
$34
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted for three days. They undergo three- to five-hour surgery depending on the location of the mass and whether it's cancerous. After surgery, they are continuously monitored in the wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Vicheka

Vicheka is the eldest of two children in her family and loves her younger sister who is three years old. Their family lives in Preah Vihear near the Thai border of Cambodia. Her father is a soldier and her mother is a potato farmer. At school, she is fond of math and Khmer literature and would like to be a teacher when she is older. She likes reading books, painting, playing with her little sister, and taking walks with her parents. When Vicheka was five, she was diagnosed with scoliosis of the spine—a sideways curvature of the spine that most often is diagnosed in adolescents. She has uneven shoulders, a bump in her lower back, difficulty standing up straight, and shortness of breath. It has become difficult for her to breathe, she tires easily, and she is having difficulty walking. This can be very difficult for young girls, they are often hidden at home because other children make fun of the way they look. A neighbor told her parents about our medical partner Children's Surgical Centre, so they traveled over 10 hours for a diagnosis and surgery. Surgeons plan to put in expanding rods along her spine. The expanding rods will allow her to grow and keep her spine from curving further, which could cause her more health problems if left untreated. Their family needs $1,500 for the surgery, which will cover medications, implants, and post-operative care. Vicheka said, "I hope the doctors can fix my spine so I can play with my friends and my back will be straight. I want to continue in school but it is hard for me to keep up, and I miss school."

73% funded

73%funded
$1,100raised
$400to go
Tajeuo

Tajeuo is a 14 month-old baby and the last born in a family of 8 children. His siblings are aged between 22 and 5 years old. They all live in their family's traditional house, called a manyatta, in Narok, Kenta. His mother takes care of their family and home, while his father is a nomadic cattle herder who is typically away from home. Tajeuo was brought to the hospital by his uncle and relatives who pooled resources together to try to help get him treated. Tajeuo has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Tajeuo has been experiencing progressive increase in his head circumference and also has had some regression in developmental milestones due to his condition. Initially, Tajeuo was able to sit without support and was attempting to crawl, but now he lacks head control and is not able to support his neck on his own. Without treatment, the hydrocephalus will progress and could result in complications, including intellectual, developmental and physical disabilities. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $720 to cover the cost of surgery that will treat Tajeuo's hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 19th and will drain the excess fluid from his brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Tajeuo will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Now, Tajeuo and his family need help raising money. Tajeuo's mother shared, “At first, seeing his head grow big, we never thought it was that needed medical attention. But it started raising concern when the size kept increasing. We appreciate any support you can provide.”

27% funded

27%funded
$200raised
$520to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.