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Success! Ma Zin from Burma raised $1,500 to fund life-saving cardiac surgery.

Ma Zin
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ma Zin's treatment was fully funded on December 24, 2021.

Photo of Ma Zin post-operation

March 18, 2022

Ma Zin underwent life-saving cardiac surgery.

Before the surgery, Ma Zin had difficulty breathing and would frequently experience pain on the left side of her chest. She would also tire easily, could not sleep well, and had no appetite. Now, she feels much better. She can walk without feeling tired, her appetite has increased and she has even gained weight. She is relieved and energized to be sleeping well at night.

Ma Zin said, “I feel grateful and happy that I am healthy again. I am also thankful for all of the donors who helped me. In the future I want to become a designer. I want to open my own shop and sell clothes that I have sewn and designed. I want to support my parents and I would like to live happily with my family for the rest of my life.”

Before the surgery, Ma Zin had difficulty breathing and would frequently experience pain on the left side of her chest. She would also tire ...

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December 16, 2021

Ma Zin is a 22-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her older sister, who works as a seamstress in a factory. Her parents and older brother live in Burma as well. Her father is retired, while her mother works as a day laborer and homemaker.

In 2019, Ma Zin began feeling tired very often. She also began having heart palpitations and occasionally difficulty breathing. She was examined by a doctor who gave her medication and referred her to a local hospital for a chest x-ray. The doctor diagnosed her with heart disease, and prescribed medication to treat her symptoms. However, in January of 2021, Ma Zin began experiencing greater fatigue and difficulty breathing. She quit her seamstress job due to her condition and visited a local hospital where she received an echocardiogram. She was diagnosed with atrial septal defect (ASD) and surgery was recommended.

Fortunately, our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) is helping Ma Zin receive treatment. On December 19th, she will undergo an atrial septal defect closure at BCMF’s care center. Now, she needs help raising $1,500 to fund her procedure and care.

In talking about her dreams for the future, Ma Zin shared, “I want to become a designer in the future. I want to recover quickly so that I can go back to work. After I recover, I will learn how to design clothes and sew them myself. I will work hard for my family. I would like to see my parents smile and be happy. I would also like to live with my family in my village.”

Ma Zin is a 22-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her older sister, who works as a seamstress in a factory. Her parents and older bro...

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Ma Zin's Timeline

  • December 16, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ma Zin was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • December 18, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ma Zin's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 19, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ma Zin received treatment at Pun Hlaing Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 24, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ma Zin's treatment was fully funded.

  • March 18, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Ma Zin's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 19 donors

Funded by 19 donors

Treatment
Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) Closure
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $8,090 for Ma Zin's treatment
Subsidies fund $6,590 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,690
Medical Staff
$1,375
Medication
$72
Supplies
$4,758
Labs
$180
Radiology
$15
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, cyanosis (a blue tinge to the skin), clubbed fingernails, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Burma has a large backlog of congenital cardiac patients who need surgery. With only four fully trained cardiac surgeons in Burma, children with congenital heart defects may have extreme difficulty accessing treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Doctors may combine catheter and surgical procedures to repair complex congenital heart defects. If the defect cannot be fixed with a catheter, the patient will undergo an open heart surgery to close holes in the heart.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is costly and only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Shee

Shee is a 23-year-old woman from Burma. In 2016, Shee and her family moved to a refugee camp in Thailand. There she has been able to continue her studies. Shee graduated from the junior college and now helps her cousin-in-law weave and sell traditional Karen clothes. She shared that it has been difficult for her family to find work within the camp at this time, but she hopes to become a teacher soon. In her free time, Shee enjoys playing with her nephews. In February, Shee began to develop a mass and experience pain in her abdomen, so she visited the camp's hospital. Upon review, she was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and given medication. Since the mass continued to grow, Shee was referred to her our medical partner's hospital, Mae Sariang Hospital, in early April. After receiving an ultrasound, the doctors determined Shee has an ovarian cyst and needs to undergo surgery to heal. Currently, Shee experiences severe pain that makes it challenging for her to sleep, eat, or continue her weaving. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), can help Shee receive treatment. On April 20th, she will undergo surgery to remove the cyst. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund the total cost of this procedure. Shee shared, "I am not worried about my operation because I hope it will fix my health problem. I would like to become a teacher in the future because I like teaching. After I recover, I plan to apply at a school in the refugee camp."

61% funded

61%funded
$929raised
$571to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.