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Success! Kefas from Tanzania raised $566 to fund hernia repair so he can play with his brother again.

Kefas
100%
  • $566 raised, $0 to go
$566
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Kefas's treatment was fully funded on August 5, 2021.

Photo of Kefas post-operation

August 11, 2021

Kefas underwent hernia repair and is excited to play with his brother again.

Kefas has had a successful surgery which healed his inguinal hernia that caused him pain for a long time. Because of this surgery, Kefas will now be able to live comfortably and confidently and return to playing without pain.

Kefas says with a big smile, “Thank you very much for treating me!”

Kefas has had a successful surgery which healed his inguinal hernia that caused him pain for a long time. Because of this surgery, Kefas wil...

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July 8, 2021

Kefas is friendly and cheerful boy from Tanzania. He loves being around his mother and playing with his six-month-old sibling.

Kefas’ parents say their son has been complaining of pain for a while, but they did not take him to the hospital because they elected to try traditional herbal medication (which has not helped alleviate the pain). Recently, as Kefas was running towards his mother to welcome her home, he accidentally tripped and fell, sustaining an injury that forced his parents to take him to the hospital. Kefas was attended to and diagnosed with an inguinal hernia which needs to be corrected surgically. An inguinal hernia is a condition in which soft tissue bulges through a weak point in the abdominal muscles. Fortunately, on July 12th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at our medical partner’s care center.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $566 to fund Kefas’ surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently.

Kefas’ mother shares, “We have used traditional medication but it has not helped treat the condition. When he had the accident and went took him to hospital we were informed his inguinal hernia is bad and it has to be corrected. Please help, we cannot afford the money needed.”

Kefas is friendly and cheerful boy from Tanzania. He loves being around his mother and playing with his six-month-old sibling. Kefas' par...

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Kefas's Timeline

  • July 8, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Kefas was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • July 12, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Kefas received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC) in Tanzania. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • July 14, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Kefas's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • August 5, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Kefas's treatment was fully funded.

  • August 11, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Kefas's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 14 donors

Funded by 14 donors

Treatment
Hernia
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $566 for Kefas's treatment
Hospital Fees
$486
Medical Staff
$15
Medication
$11
Supplies
$13
Labs
$14
Other
$27
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A hernia occurs when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the lower abdominal wall, usually for one of two reasons. The first is a congenital abnormality in which the tissues did not close. The second is excessive stress in an adult, often due to heavy physical labor or pregnancy. Patients experience a bulge or lump in the affected area. The hernia may cause the patient to feel pain, discomfort, weakness, pressure, and sensations of heaviness or aching. These symptoms are often exacerbated when the patient coughs, bends over, or lifts heavy objects. In some cases, hernias have no symptoms and are only detected during routine medical exams.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with uncomplicated hernias may experience only annoyance or discomfort. As the hernia opening expands, the discomfort will increase. Small openings are more likely to trap the intestine, potentially leading to intestinal damage or death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hernias are common in Africa. People often do very hard physical labor and lift heavy objects. Women tend to have more children than those in the United States. It is possible that some hernias have infectious or genetic causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts for three to eight hours, depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient will stay in the hospital anywhere from two days to eight weeks, again depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment is curative. The chance of intestinal strangulation or bowel obstruction reduces significantly.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Hernia repair is not a risky procedure, and it comes with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many patients will ignore a hernia until it becomes uncomfortable and seek care at that time. Some people will wear tighter pants or a tight band around the waist to prevent the intestine from protruding.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If the hernia is not “stuck,” patients tend to ignore it and adapt to living with it. However, this could lead to future complications.

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Titus

Titus is a 22-year-old motorcyclist and is the sixth born in a family of nine: six boys and three girls. His father earns wages from farming and working in other people’s farms, while his mother takes care of their house and family. They live in a two-roomed iron-built house in their village. Two months ago, Titus was involved in a road accident. He was riding a motorcycle that lost brake power and fell into a ditch. Titus sustained lacerations on his knee and fractured his right patella, and was rushed to a nearby district hospital where he was sutured and discharged home. Three weeks later, when he tried to stretch his leg, his wound opened and an X-Ray imaging of his leg revealed an open patella fracture. The doctor has recommended open reduction and internal fixation surgery and skin grafting to avoid further complications and further wound infection. Currently, Titus is in pain and has to use a walking frame to get around. His parents have desperately searched for a solution, but their socioeconomic status with the family of many children in school with fees has limited the options of helping Titus. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 13th, Titus will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will relieve him of his pain and he'll be able to use his leg once he recovers. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Titus shared, "My biggest hope is to get an opportunity to be treated so that I can go home to better my life.”

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