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Success! Tha Gay from Burma raised $1,500 for surgery to treat his fractured forearm.

Tha Gay
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Tha Gay's treatment was fully funded on July 15, 2016.

Photo of Tha Gay post-operation

August 22, 2016

Tha Gay received treatment for his fractured forearm.

After surgery, Tha Gay is able to move his hand again. He was in a lot pain after the anesthesia wore off, but it subsided and he no longer worries about his condition. After his post-op follow up, he will go back to his work to serve people as he did before.

“After my fractured arm is healed, I will continue work as health worker at the clinic in Karen State,” Tha Gay shared, “because I have to help people get basic health care. I would like to thank all donors and staffs who help me to get treatment and [enable me] to work again as health worker.”

After surgery, Tha Gay is able to move his hand again. He was in a lot pain after the anesthesia wore off, but it subsided and he no longer ...

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June 21, 2016

Tha Gay is a 26-year-old mobile health worker. He studied medicine at the refugee camp where he lived in high school to pursue his dream: helping people in need of basic healthcare in rural areas of southern Burma. But at the moment, Tha Gay is not able to do this work that he is passionate about.

About a month ago, Tha Gay was in a motorbike accident while transferring clinic supplies to a remote area. He suffered a severe fracture in his right arm. His friends helped him get back to the clinic where he works to access the free healthcare there—a bandage and painkillers for his arm. However, Tha Gay did not try to access more advanced medical treatment for his condition in Burma because he could not afford the cost and difficult transportation due to bad weather.

Currently, Tha Gay is not able to move his right arm nor lift up, grab anything, or wash his clothing. He feels guilty that his broken arm has taken him out of commission for his medical work. There are currently only a few health workers at the clinic where he is employed, and many patients come there during the rainy season for diseases like malaria.

We can help Tha Gay gets back to work soon. For $1,500, doctors will perform an open reduction internal fixation operation on his arm. In this procedure, they will surgically align the broken parts of his arm, then will set them in place using a rod or screw. This implanted equipment will guide the bone as it heals to make sure it grows back in the correct position. The requested sum will also cover the cost of the week-long hospital stay that Tha Gay will need to recuperate from the procedure.

“After my fractured arm is healed, I will continue work as a health worker at the clinic because I want to help people get basic healthcare,” Tha Gay shared.

Tha Gay is a 26-year-old mobile health worker. He studied medicine at the refugee camp where he lived in high school to pursue his dream: he...

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Tha Gay's Timeline

  • June 21, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Tha Gay was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • June 21, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Tha Gay received treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • July 2, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Tha Gay's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 15, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Tha Gay's treatment was fully funded.

  • August 22, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Tha Gay's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 24 donors

Funded by 24 donors

Treatment
ORIF
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The patient has broken bones and experiences pain and swelling.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The patient will experience decreased mobility. He or she will not be able to do normal daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Many people in remote areas try to fix broken legs and arms by themselves. They also visit spiritual healers or traditional massagers. Sometimes, broken bones heal in incorrect positions.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After a series of x-rays, the doctor decides to perform fracture repair surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Healing takes time. When the bones have completely healed, patients will resume their normal activities without pain or swelling.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include allergic response, infection, malignancy, and osteoporosis.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If the broken bones are not fixed, the patient will spend his or her life in pain. Decreased mobility will cause the patient to require help from others.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Saw Wah

Saw Wah is a 14-year-old grade six student from Burma. Saw Wah lives with his parents and five younger brothers in a village in Hpapun Township in Karen State where there is a lot of unrest currently. Saw Wah's father works as a day labourer when there is no work on the farm. Saw Wah's youngest brother is too young to enroll in school while his four other brothers stopped going to school this last year. Saw Wah shared, “They do not want to attend school because fighting happens very often in this area. We have to run and hide in the jungle where we study and they do not like to study in the jungle.” Saw Wah’s family also raises chickens and two goats for their own consumption. They also often go fishing and forage for vegetables in the jungle. Even though his family does not have a regular income, they can gather enough food. Saw Wah's family receives free basic healthcare at a free clinic near their village. Around 2018 or 2019, Saw Wah developed a runny nose with yellowish nasal discharge. At first, he thought that this was normal, and it would go away on its own. Towards the end of April 2022, Saw Wah nose became blocked, and he could no longer breath through his nose. He finally told his parents about his symptoms and his father took him to the free clinic at Ei Tu Hta Internally Displaced Camp. At the clinic, the medic checked Saw Wah's nostrils and told them that there is mass blocking the nasal passage in both of his nostrils. The medic also recommended Saw Wah go to a larger hospital for further investigation. At this time, Saw Wah has to breathe through his mouth which causes him discomfort. He has lost his sense of taste and smell, and has a hard time sleeping. Due to these symptoms, Saw Wah has had to stop his studies while he receives treatment. Saw Wah worries that it will take a while, and he will not be able to study this year. Fortunately, Saw Wah sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Now he is scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on September 6th. BCMF is fundraising $1,500 to cover the cost of Saw Wah's procedure and care. Saw Wah shared, "I am excited to receive surgery and I hope that I will be able to breath through my nose after surgery."

94% funded

94%funded
$1,423raised
$77to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.