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Success! Aung from Burma raised $1,500 to fund cardiac surgery.

Aung
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Aung's treatment was fully funded on October 10, 2020.

Photo of Aung post-operation

April 17, 2020

Aung underwent life-saving cardiac surgery.

Before surgery, Aung frequently had chest pain, would easily tire, had no appetite, and difficulty breathing and sleeping. Since his surgery, his symptoms have improved greatly. He no longer has a hard time breathing, no longer tires easily, is able to sleep well, and his appetite has increased. He is very thankful for all the help he received and would like to thank everyone for helping him.

Aung said, “When I went back home, I saw my friends and family waiting for me and they were very happy to see that my treatment had been successful.”

“In the future, I will continue to work with my wife at the same office and I will continue to support my children so that they can become educated,” said Aung.

Before surgery, Aung frequently had chest pain, would easily tire, had no appetite, and difficulty breathing and sleeping. Since his surgery...

Read more
January 23, 2020

Aung is a 34-year-old man from Burma who lives with his wife, son, and daughter. Both he and his wife work as government officers. In his free time he likes to read books.

Aung was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Aung feels tired, has chest pains, and has difficulty breathing. However, he can eat and sleep well.

Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Aung. The treatment is scheduled to take place on January 27th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably.

“I want to go back to work [as a] healthy [person] and support my family,” said Aung.

Aung is a 34-year-old man from Burma who lives with his wife, son, and daughter. Both he and his wife work as government officers. In his fr...

Read more

Aung's Timeline

  • January 23, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Aung was submitted by Bridgitte Agocs at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • January 28, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Aung received treatment at Pinlon Private Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 28, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Aung's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 17, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Aung's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • October 10, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Aung's treatment was fully funded.

Treatment
Mitral Valve Replacement with Tricuspid Ring Annuoloplasty
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $5,278 for Aung's treatment
Subsidies fund $3,778 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,900
Medical Staff
$1,066
Medication
$0
Supplies
$1,800
Labs
$100
Radiology
$15
Other
$397
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Patients cannot afford to go to the hospital. Many people rely on medications provided by dealers who are not authorized pharmacists.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Damaged valves are repaired and replaced during open heart surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Saing

Saing is a 74-year-old rice farmer. She is a widow and has one daughter, two sons, and six grandchildren. Her husband passed away during the Khmer Rouge regime, so she lives with her oldest daughter, who works in a garment factory. Saing used to be a rice farmer but shared that she can no longer work in the fields due to her declining vision. At home, Saing likes to listen to the monks pray on the radio and go to the pagoda. Four years ago, Saing developed a pterygium in her right eye, causing her itchiness, tearing, and blurry vision. Pterygiums are non-cancerous growths of the conjunctiva, a mucous layer that lubricates the eye. The growths occur when the conjunctiva is exposed to excessive sun damage, and the cells grow abnormally over the pupil. As a result of this condition, Saing has difficulty seeing things clearly and a hard time with day-to-day tasks. She used to cook for her daughter's family but finds it too difficult now. When Saing learned about our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), she traveled for three and half hours seeking treatment. On April 22nd, she will undergo surgery to remove the abnormal conjunctiva from the cornea surface and replace it with a conjunctival graft to prevent a recurrence. CSC is requesting $225 to cover the total cost of her procedure, which includes medications, supplies, and inpatient care for two days. Saing shared, "I hope my eyes stop burning after surgery, and I can go outside and be more independent."

13% funded

13%funded
$30raised
$195to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.