Armon's Story

Armon joined Watsi on April 7th, 2014. Ten years ago, Armon joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Armon's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Amina, a 48-year-old woman from Kenya, to fund a hysterectomy.

Impact

Armon has funded healthcare for 128 patients in 14 countries.

Patients funded by Armon

Ko Tin is a 34-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his parents and his younger brother in a village in Yangon Division, Burma. He used to be a driver before his condition got worse but now he has stopped. Currently, Ko Tin is living with his parents who are farmers and support him. The whole family’s income is just enough for their basic expenses and basic health care. Ko Tin has a wife who went to Thailand for work about four months ago but he has lost contact with her. When he has the energy and free time, Ko Tin likes playing football with friends. Ko Tin was diagnosed with a heart condition that requires replacement of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. In mid October, Ko Tin experienced fever, cough, body pain, difficult breathing, and severe fatigue when he walks a short distance. After he visited the cardiologist in Yangon Hospital, he was diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation and doctor recommend that he should receive surgery. Currently, Ko Tin feels tired, coughs often, and is experiencing difficult breathing. Sometimes, he feels pain from his legs and his arms, and he cannot sleep well at night. He will feel extremely fatigued with shortness of breath when he lays down on the floor. He also cannot walk long distances. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Ko Tin. The treatment is scheduled to take place at Pun Hlaing Hospital on December 3rd and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Ko Tin said, “I would like to recover as soon as possible. My parents are worried about me, and they have difficulty earning enough money to pay for my treatment. I hope my wife to return, and I would like to live as a happy family.”

$929raised
$571to go

23-year-old Josephine and her two siblings live with their mother in Kenya and participate in small-scale farming for home consumption. Josephine has no source of income but is hoping to pursue a course in hairdressing. On April 16th, 2022, while planting corn on their farm, Josephine slipped and plunged into a hole she hadn't seen. She sustained a fracture in her right leg and surgery was performed to stabilize the bone and help the fracture heal. Two months after the surgery, Josephine started noticing pus accumulating in the affected area. She returned to the hospital and was treated, but her condition did not improve. In October 2022, doctors noted that the hardware that had been placed in Josephine's leg to stabilize the bone had actually caused an infection. Despite the removal of the hardware, the infection has persisted. Josephine has a large mid-diaphyseal sequestrum. This means that her femur bone is infected. As a result, she is unable to use her right leg to walk. If left untreated, the infection can spread, and potentially result in an amputation. With the assistance of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, Josephine has been scheduled for a Right Femur Sequestrectomy and Exfix to clear the infection and strengthen the bone, allowing it to heal completely. The surgery, which will take place at AIC Kijabe Hospital on April 17th, will enable Josephine to walk easily again so that she can farm and pursue the course in hairdressing. She and her family need your help to raise the $1,500 to fund her treatment. Josephine says, “I want to go to college and do a course in hairdressing. I am unable to pursue this dream since I have a broken bone that needs to be attended to.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Salato is a 5-year-old boy from Tanzania. He is a part of the Maasai tribe and comes from a large Maasai family with seven children. His father is a livestock keeper. Due to their remote location, the family relies on livestock and selling cattle as their main source of income to cover their expenses. Salato was diagnosed with genu valgus. His legs bow inward so that his knees knock. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Salato faces difficulty walking long distances and experiences considerable discomfort due to the abnormal gait he has developed. This condition has also limited his ability to help his father with the livestock and hampers his ability to socialize with others. During an outreach visit from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), Salato and his parents had the opportunity to attend a clinic where he received education about his condition. The church kindly assisted in facilitating his transportation to the hospital. Upon arrival, the team warmly welcomed him and conducted a thorough assessment. As a result, a plan was formulated to correct the abnormality in his right leg surgically. However, Salato and his parents are unable to afford the costs associated with his treatment. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help. Salato will undergo a corrective procedure on August 2nd. Treatment will hopefully restore Salato's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. AMH is requesting $880 to cover the cost of Salato's treatment. Salato’s guardian says, “He often feels left out when he can’t socialize with his peers. We hope the treatment will help him fit in his society.”

$880raised
Fully funded