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Success! Israel from Kenya raised $700 to fund corrective surgery.

Israel
100%
  • $700 raised, $0 to go
$700
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Israel's treatment was fully funded on May 21, 2019.

Photo of Israel post-operation

June 5, 2019

Israel underwent corrective surgery.

Israel’s surgery was successfully done in our medical partner’s facility.

Israel’s surgery was successfully done in our medical partner's facility....

April 30, 2019

Israel is a young boy from Kenya. He was born with hypospadias, a congenital abnormality that causes urinary dysfunction. Without treatment, he will continue to experience uncomfortable symptoms and will be at risk of infertility.

Fortunately, Israel is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on May 3. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $700 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

“I feel relieved that there is a possibility of getting help. I really am grateful to God,” says Israel’s mother.

Israel is a young boy from Kenya. He was born with hypospadias, a congenital abnormality that causes urinary dysfunction. Without treatment,...

Read more

Israel's Timeline

  • April 30, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Israel was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare Foundation, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • May 03, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Israel received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 06, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Israel's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • May 21, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Israel's treatment was fully funded.

  • June 05, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Israel's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 9 donors

Funded by 9 donors

Treatment
Hypospadius Repair
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $700 for Israel's treatment
Hospital Fees
$684
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$12
Supplies
$0
Labs
$4
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Hypospadias is a congenital defect in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis. The urethra is the tube that drains urine from the bladder. In males, the opening of the urethra is normally at the end of the penis. Symptoms of hypospadias vary. This condition may cause genital malformation and urinary dysfunction. It can lead to infections, social stigma, and infertility.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If this condition is not repaired, it can lead to urinary dysfunction, genital malformation, infertility, and increased risk of urinary tract infections.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hypospadias is one of the most common birth defects in boys. It is the most frequent congenital urological anomaly, occurring in 1–3 per 1,000 live births.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient is monitored closely and discharged from the hospital after five days. Stitches will be removed during a follow-up appointment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The urethra will be corrected, improving urinary function.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This is a low-risk procedure, and the impact of this surgery lasts a lifetime. If the patient has complicated hypospadias, he may need to undergo further surgery. Follow-up visits with a urologist may also be needed, particularly when patients reach puberty.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Surgery is not required for mild cases. Otherwise, there is no alternative.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Lay

Nan is a 22-year-old woman from Burma. She works as a medic at a clinic near her village. In her free time, she enjoys reading health-related books to gain more knowledge on the work she does. In 2014, while she was attending the medic training at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), she had a fever which was followed by pain in her back and her right abdomen. Although she had ultrasound done at the clinic, the result showed normal. She was just treated for urinary tract infection, and she felt better after five days. In 2016, she again experienced pain in her abdomen but this time was on the left side. She went to a clinic in Taunggyi, Burma, where she again had an ultrasound imaging test. The result this time revealed a stone in her left ureter. The doctor told her to undergo surgery to remove the stone but because she could not afford the surgical cost 800,000 kyat (approx. 800 USD), she just asked for medication. Since then she had a few episode of severe abdominal pain, and she went to different hospitals in Burma to seek treatment but the doctors kept telling her that she needed surgery. One day in 2019, Nan ran into a friend who also had the same kind of health condition as hers. Her friend told her about the assistance she received at Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) and advised her to ask for help there. Nan then went to MTC, a partner organisation of BCMF. After confirming Nan's diagnosis, MTC referred her to BCMF. Nan still is experiencing back pain at the moment. She worries that her pain will increase when she has to travel. She has pain at her back and at suprapubic area, especially when she sits for a longer period of time and/or when she drinks insufficiently. Although Nan wants to continue learning and attending more training on medical and health, her health problem has limited her ability to finish her trainings. Nan said, “After I recovery from this condition, I will save money so that I can open a small shop, for my parents, to sell dry foods."

52% funded

52%funded
$792raised
$708to go
Eh

Eh is a 22-year-old woman from Thailand. She was born and lives her parents and younger brother in Mae La Refugee Camp. Her younger brother studies at the bible school at the camp. Eh used to attend the same school as a third-year student, but she had to stop studying when her health deteriorated. Eh's father is a homemaker, and her mother works for the department of health at the camp. In 2017, Eh started to become more tired and began to have difficulty breathing. Her mother took her to the clinic in the camp and the doctor listened to her heart, did an electrocardiogram (ECG) and told Eh’s mother that Eh has a heart disease. She was then referred to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. Eh was not told anything about her condition, and the doctor only informed her parents without telling her. Eh had an echocardiogram (echo) at MSH in December 2018. After the echo, she travelled back and forward several times from Mae La refugee camp to MSH for medical follow-up visits. Finally, the doctor at MSH informed her that she needs surgery. Currently, Eh has dizziness, headaches, tiredness and sometimes experiences difficulty breathing. She sleeps well but has lost her appetite and she sometimes suffers from chest pain. She loves reading and playing football and volleyball in her free time. Eh was born with ventricular septal defect, a cardiac condition in which a hole exists between the two lower chambers of the heart. Blood leaks through this hole without first passing through his lungs to obtain oxygen, leaving him sick and short of breath. Eh is scheduled to undergo heart surgery on October 5th to correct her condition and improve her quality of life. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Eh's procedure and care. Eh said, “All my classmate graduated, and I want to as well, but I am tired of studying and when I think about this, I cry”.

85% funded

85%funded
$1,278raised
$222to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Lay

Nan is a 22-year-old woman from Burma. She works as a medic at a clinic near her village. In her free time, she enjoys reading health-related books to gain more knowledge on the work she does. In 2014, while she was attending the medic training at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), she had a fever which was followed by pain in her back and her right abdomen. Although she had ultrasound done at the clinic, the result showed normal. She was just treated for urinary tract infection, and she felt better after five days. In 2016, she again experienced pain in her abdomen but this time was on the left side. She went to a clinic in Taunggyi, Burma, where she again had an ultrasound imaging test. The result this time revealed a stone in her left ureter. The doctor told her to undergo surgery to remove the stone but because she could not afford the surgical cost 800,000 kyat (approx. 800 USD), she just asked for medication. Since then she had a few episode of severe abdominal pain, and she went to different hospitals in Burma to seek treatment but the doctors kept telling her that she needed surgery. One day in 2019, Nan ran into a friend who also had the same kind of health condition as hers. Her friend told her about the assistance she received at Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) and advised her to ask for help there. Nan then went to MTC, a partner organisation of BCMF. After confirming Nan's diagnosis, MTC referred her to BCMF. Nan still is experiencing back pain at the moment. She worries that her pain will increase when she has to travel. She has pain at her back and at suprapubic area, especially when she sits for a longer period of time and/or when she drinks insufficiently. Although Nan wants to continue learning and attending more training on medical and health, her health problem has limited her ability to finish her trainings. Nan said, “After I recovery from this condition, I will save money so that I can open a small shop, for my parents, to sell dry foods."

52% funded

52%funded
$792raised
$708to go