Kumar ThanguduMONTHLY DONOR
Kumar's Story

Kumar joined Watsi on May 21st, 2014. Seven years ago, Kumar joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Kumar's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Kenneth, a motorcycle taxi driver from Kenya, to fund fracture repair surgery so he can walk and work again.

Impact

Kumar has funded healthcare for 76 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Kumar

Kenneth is a moto-taxi driver hailing from Marakwet County in Kenya. Kenneth completed his secondary school education in 2014 but did not proceed to college due to a lack of funds. He lives in a single-roomed rental house and he depends on his low-paying job to pay rent and provide daily needs for his family. During the afternoon on Saturday, November 6th, Kenneth was involved in a hit-and-run road traffic accident with a motorbike when he was headed home from his daily hustle. He sustained injuries on his leg including a fracture of the left femur which was confirmed after doing an X-Ray. Kenneth was brought by his brothers to our medical partner's hospital where his fracture was immobilized and he was admitted to the surgical ward. He is currently unable to use or move his leg. He is also in immense pain. This road accident has been extremely tough for Kenneth and his family since he has been the only breadwinner. Now he is worried about the struggles his family might face if he is not treated. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 9th, Kenneth will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This surgery will rid him of the pain and restore his ability to use his leg. He is seeking financial support to help him undergo the surgery. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Kenneth says, “I want to receive treatment [and] walk again so that I can be well and continue supporting my family.”

56%funded
$642raised
$503to go

Godwin is three-month-old baby boy and the last born child in a family of two children. Godwin's parents are small-scale farmers and his father has a small shop where he sells fruits and vegetables. His parents have spent all their savings seeking treatment for Godwin. However, their savings were not enough to fund his medical bills and so they resorted to borrowing from their friends and relatives. They are still in debt and can no longer find any money to pay for their son's shunt revision surgery that he needs to treat his worrying condition. Godwin has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Godwin has been experiencing an increased size of his head due to fluid accumulation. Without treatment, Godwin will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $765 to cover the cost of surgery for Godwin that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on October 13th and will drain the excess fluid from Godwin's brain. This will reduce the intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Godwin will develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Godwin’s mother says “We can no longer raise the money needed to cover our son’s treatment. We are in debt and we have no one to run to, please help us."

$765raised
Fully funded

Suraiya is a young three-year-old girl and the last born child in a family of two. Her parents depend on small scale farming of maize and vegetables to feed their family and they sell the surplus to make ends meet. Suraiya's mother also sells food at a local food joint commonly known as Mama Ntilie to supplement their income. Suraiya was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus. She is currently having a hard time walking due to her legs bending outwardly. Her mother noticed the condition when Suraiya learned to stand and walk. They tried to seek treatment for her at the district hospital but the cost was too high for them to afford. They were advised to get national health insurance for her but due to financial challenges, they could not afford to get the insurance. During a medical outreach program organized by Plaster House, Suraiya's parents were advised to take her to ALMC Hospital for review. Her condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. Over the years Suraiya's legs have worsened making walking more difficult and painful for her. Suraiya and her family are appealing for help for her to be treated. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Suraiya. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 19th. Treatment will hopefully restore Suraiya's mobility, allow her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Suraiya’s mother says, "Money to cover our daughter’s treatment cost has been our biggest challenge because the cost is too high for us to afford. Please help treat our daughter.”

$880raised
Fully funded

Bernard is a driver from Kenya. Bernard is a father of 8 children from his two wives. He lives in a rental house and is the main breadwinner in the family. He does not have national insurance nor did he own the vehicle he drove when the road accident occurred. Bernard is a driver in the public transport system, commonly referred to as matatus. On 12th of February 2020, John was involved in a grisly road accident that left 22 people with various injuries. According to Bernard, the oncoming vehicle was overlapping at high speed at a place that is increasingly becoming a blackspot. Bernard and the other patients were brought to Watsi's medical partner care center and immediately started receiving treatment. Bernard had a nail implant on his left femur and a right foot closed reduction and percutaneous pinning that morning. He has been recovering and is planned for a second surgery to correct the acetabular open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). He is in chronic pain and is not able to move from his bed. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On February 19th, Bernard will undergo a fracture repair procedure called an ORIF. This treatment will help Bernard heal well and be able to walk and eventually work again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,042 to fund this procedure. Bernard says, “I am appealing for help to have the surgery. My family is not able to raise the funds needed. I am however hopeful that soon I will be able to walk.”

$1,042raised
Fully funded

Khin is a 39-year-old woman who lives with her family in Hpa-An Township, Karen State, Burma. Both her children are in preschool. She and her husband are subsistence farmers, growing rice during the rainy season on rented land. The rest of the year, her husband collects leaves used to make roofs, works as a daily labourer or collects branches to sell. Khin was born with a scar the size of an ant bite on her upper lip. Her parents thought that it would disappear or heal on its own but the scar developed into a growth and increased in size. Her parents passed away when she was young and after that she went to live with her brother’s family. By the time she was around 20 years old, the growth had become large and soft, covering the area between her upper lips and her nose. When the pain became unbearable in 2005, her uncle dropped her off at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Thailand, a free clinic close to where her uncle used to work. At this point, the growth had become so large that dragged her upper lip down and extended into her nostrils. At MTC, she was seen by doctors and medics, before she was diagnosed with a hemangioma. At this point, the growth had worsened, and she was bleeding from her lips. In April 2006, Khin went to Chiang Mai Hospital and had the hemangioma removed surgically. The growth later has returned. Overtime, the hemangioma has increased in size and become hard. It has now expanded into Khin’s nostrils, especially her left nostril, which causes her to have difficulty breathing at times. She feels uncomfortable but is not in pain. Sometimes she also feels like she has a blood clot in her nostrils during her nosebleeds. Because the nosebleed can start at any time and can last anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, her life revolves around managing her nosebleeds. She is unable to work or sleep properly, and if she is about to have a nosebleed, she is unable to eat. The nosebleeds have also affected her ability to earn an income for her children and continues to impact her social life. “When I socialise, I do not feel comfortable and some people think I have a disease that I can infect them with,” said Khin. “So, I hope to get better after surgery, and I hope I will no longer have nosebleeds. I don’t want to bleed, and I want to socialise with my friends and family happily. [Right now] my friends won’t even touch me.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded