Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Ashiraf from Uganda raised $133 to fund fracture repair.

Ashiraf
100%
  • $133 raised, $0 to go
$133
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ashiraf's treatment was fully funded on May 19, 2017.
April 13, 2017

Ashiraf underwent fracture repair.

Ashiraf’s leg was successfully set by the orthopedic specialist at Bwindi Community Hospital. However, he did not return for a followup examination, and all attempts to reach him have failed. Our medical partner assumes he has had his cast removed at a local health center.

Ashiraf's leg was successfully set by the orthopedic specialist at Bwindi Community Hospital. However, he did not return for a followup exam...

Read more
February 16, 2017

Ashiraf is a 17-year-old boy from Kambuga in rural Uganda. He is currently in school. In his free time, Ashiraf enjoys playing soccer in the community and gathering sand from the roadside, which he then sells for construction to raise money for his school materials. Ashiraf’s mother is a widow who farms their small piece of land. She also works as a cleaner at a local school. In addition to having five children of her own, she takes care of two orphans.

Ashiraf recently sustained an ankle fracture from playing soccer. While playing with the other boys in the community, he was tackled and broke both his tibia and fibula bones. His teammates immediately carried him home. His mother rushed him to a health facility. She was then referred to our medical partner’s care center, Bwindi Community Hospital, where Ashiraf is scheduled to undergo fracture repair treatment on February 16.

Our medical partner, The Kellermann Foundation, is requesting $133 to treat Ashiraf’s fracture. Upon recovery, Ashiraf hopes to go back to school and complete his primary school training. He hopes to be a banker when he graduates.

“I want to thank the donors for the support they are rendering toward my son, to have his fracture fixed. I also thank the team at Bwindi for welcoming us and counseling us, giving us hope which we needed,” says Ashiraf’s mother.

Ashiraf is a 17-year-old boy from Kambuga in rural Uganda. He is currently in school. In his free time, Ashiraf enjoys playing soccer in the...

Read more

Ashiraf's Timeline

  • February 16, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ashiraf was submitted by Barnabas Oyesiga, Communications Officer at The Kellermann Foundation.

  • February 16, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ashiraf received treatment at Bwindi Community Hospital in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 22, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ashiraf's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 13, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    We received an update on Ashiraf. Read the update.

  • May 19, 2017
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ashiraf's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 5 donors

Funded by 5 donors

Treatment
Fracture - Closed
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $133 for Ashiraf's treatment
Hospital Fees
$68
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$8
Supplies
$26
Labs
$31
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients are usually in a lot of pain. Depending on the location of the fracture, they may not be able to stand, walk, or use the affected limb. The affected limb may be distorted, and there may be swelling or bruising around the site of the break.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Fractures impact a person’s ability to work and complete normal daily activities. The patients often cannot go to school or work. Their inability to perform daily household activities prevents them from helping their families. In rural Uganda, many people avoid going to the hospital because they are concerned about costs. Instead, they may rely on local "bone setters." If not treated promptly and properly, a fracture can heal incorrectly, leaving the patient with a distorted limb.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Fractures often occur because of high-impact injuries. In the Bwindi area, such injuries often occur during traffic accidents. “Boda bodas,” or motorcycle taxis, are very common throughout Uganda. It is estimated that boda boda accidents account for up to 50% of road traffic accidents. Poorly maintained roads, the lack of helmets, and reckless driving all contribute to the high incidence of boda boda accidents. Other causes of injury are falls from heights, trees, and hills. People can also become injured if they work without safety gear.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The first step is to take an x-ray of the injury to ascertain the number of breaks and to identify fractures requiring skin traction. If there are no complications, the fracture will be set through the closed reduction method, which does not require surgery. If the bone has multiple breaks, however, the open reduction method, which includes surgery, may be needed. A plaster of Paris cast will be applied. If an open reduction surgery is performed, a window will be left in the cast through which to treat the wound. A patient with a simple fracture will remain in the hospital for one to three days. If skin traction was required or open reduction surgery was used to set the bone, he or she may stay longer, allowing doctors to ensure the wound is healing properly. After discharge, the patient will wait for one month before returning to the hospital to have the cast removed or replaced. Recovery will continue at home until the fracture is completely healed.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Prompt and proper treatment of fractures can prevent the malunion or nonunion of bones, and thus the need for further surgery. Malunion or nonunion can leave a patient disabled, cause a limp, or lead to other complications.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There are no side effects, except the patient's inability to use the affected limb during healing. Delayed treatment, however, can make it much more difficult to set bones properly.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Before reaching a hospital, patients may receive aid in the form of splints and slings. However, proper care of a fracture should be done at a hospital. The only other hospital is over two hours away by car.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Many people cannot afford to go to the hospital. They will attempt to treat the injury at home with a local bone setter or at a lower-level health facility. This often results in improperly healed fractures.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.