Kaye and Mark Rowlinson
Kaye's Story

Kaye joined Watsi on September 5th, 2013. 9 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Kaye's most recent donation supported Sambath, a six-year-old boy from Cambodia, to fund surgery to repair his eardrums.

Impact

Kaye has funded healthcare for 509 patients in 16 countries.

Patients funded by Kaye

58-year-old Natchokani is a widow from a village in Dedza District in Malawi. With seven children, six of whom have passed away, she now lives with her youngest child, who is 7 years old and attending primary school. Natchokani never had the opportunity to attend school, making it challenging for her to find employment. Consequently, she relies on farming to sustain herself and her son, growing maize, beans, and groundnuts for both sustenance and income. Twenty years ago, Natchokani noticed an itch and an uncomfortable feeling in her throat whenever she was eating. Shortly after, people in her vicinity informed her of a swelling on her neck, which she eventually noticed herself. The swelling has been increasing in size over the years but she never went to seek medical help in health centers as she did not have finances to pay for treatment. Instead, she tried traditional medicine to no avail. Natchokani has continued to experience severe headaches and pain in her upper back. She struggles to swallow and sometimes has shortness of breath when she is lying down. She is unable to carry a heavy load on her head, therefore making it difficult for her to carry out household chores such as fetching water, and firewood and going to the maize mill. One day while she was visiting a patient at our medical partner's care center Nkhoma Hospital, she was seen by a surgeon who later diagnosed her with a multinodular mass, and thyroidectomy was recommended. Our medical partner African Mission Healthcare is requesting $491 to fund Natchokani's thyroid surgery scheduled for March 7th. Following the surgery, her symptoms will be alleviated, allowing her to breathe more easily and engage in her daily tasks without discomfort. Natchokani says, “I hope to receive treatment and resume life without this condition so that I can take care of my only son.”

$6raised
$485to go

Asiyatu is a married mother of two children aged 8 and 3 years. Her first child is in 3rd grade and the youngest is in nursery school. She is a homemakerwhile her husband is an Airtel money branch manager earning about $208.72 per month from his business and he takes care of all the bills at home. They live in a three-bedroomed rented house costing $29.82 per month. Asiyatu likes chatting with her children and enjoys eating chips and vegetables. Asiyatu was well until 2020 after the delivery of her second child when she noted a small lump on her left breast that was not painful. She visited a nearby hospital but did not receive help. The husband took her to Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) after noting that the lump was getting bigger as time passed. She was brought to Partners in Hope Medical Center (PIH) for a lumpectomy which is a surgery that removes cancer from the breast through the removal of a tumor and a small rim of normal tissues around it, and a sample was sent for histology. In September, she reported back to PIH for histology results that revealed an Invasive Breast Carcinoma requiring a mastectomy. She was then referred back to KCH for surgery since the husband could no longer manage to pay for the surgery as he did with the previous one. She was scheduled for surgery the next year. Lately, Asiyatu has been experiencing needle-pricking pain that is becoming unbearable without pain-relieving medications, affecting her household chores. As a result of her pain, her husband took her back to the hospital in November for support where she was then referred back to PIH for urgent surgery seeking support under the Watsi program. Doctors at PIH confirmed the need for a modified radical mastectomy, a surgery. Their family is able to commit $89.45 to support her care and their family is raising the remaining funds. Asiyatu believes the surgical operation will help her get back home in good condition and continue taking care of her children and her caring husband. Asiyatu said, “I am ready to live with one breast as I hope to get rid of all my pains and have my perfect life back again.”

$796raised
$398to go

Phorp is a 21-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. He lives at home with his parents and 18-year-old brother. His family also works as rice farmers in Siem Reap province. At home, in his free time, Phorp loves to play volleyball. In August, Phorp was in a motorbike accident and fell on his left shoulder. He sustained multiple injuries, including lacerations and paralysis of his left arm due to nerve damage. He visited the local provincial hospital for stitches for the lacerations, but he did not receive care for the nerve damage. Phorp has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on his left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. There has been no improvement in his arm over the last several months. Currently, he cannot use his hand and, consequently, cannot work outside in the rice paddies with his family. Fortunately, Phorp traveled to our medical partner's care center for treatment. This is the only center in the country where this treatment is available. On November 3rd, he will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, he should be able to use his arm once again. Our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), is requesting $709 to fund this procedure. Phorp contributed $100 to his care. Phorp said, "After surgery, I hope that I can lift my shoulder and arm and be able to work."

$709raised
Fully funded

Faith is a 24-year-old woman from the Rift valley in Kenya who has had epilepsy since 2018. On December 15th, 2023 she had a convulsive episode and fell on an open flame in her kitchen. She sustained third degree burns on her right arm and was rushed to the nearest hospital. She was admitted for three days and received IV fluids, pain medication, and wound care before going home. Since her injuries did not improve, she went to Kapsowar Hospital and was diagnosed with third degree burns from her right elbow to her hand. She had no sensation in her forearm and fingers, no range of motion of the wrist and elbow, and was experiencing discharge and swelling. She also had exposed tendons and blood clots. Faith was scheduled for a procedure to remove the dead tissue from her arm, then for amputation of her second, third, fourth and fifth fingers in order to salvage the hand. At this point, it was determined she needed a further procedure and skin graft of her arm, along with major reconstruction in order to promote healing. Faith is the youngest in a family of six children. She could not finish her schooling due her epilepsy. Her parents are farmers working on two acres of land growing maize, beans and potatoes to provide for the needs of their children. Faith is not insured since she is over age and not covered by parents’ insurance. Her parents are unable to afford Faith's surgery and they thought she would be covered by the insurance. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,089 to fund Faith's surgery. Faith said, “I have been in a lot of pain especially when having daily dressing changes, please help me so that I get well soon and be free from this pain.”

$325raised
$764to go

Hellen is a nine-year-old girl who is approaching grade one. She is one of nine siblings, three of whom share the same congenital condition of clubfoot. Both of her parents are farmers. They cultivate maize and millet for food and sell the surplus to earn money for other expenses. Unfortunately, Hellen’s father, who is advancing in age and has clubfoot, cannot work extended hours. Therefore, his mother toils diligently on the farm to ensure they yield sufficient harvests. Hellen has clubfoot on her left foot and, fortunately, Hellen's family visited our medical partner's care center, the Plaster House NGO. There, the team began clubfoot treatment on October 6th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $935 to fund Hellen's clubfoot repair. After treatment, she will use night casts to aid in her full recovery and later be able to walk comfortably. She did not receive treatment as a baby because of her parents' lack of knowledge about the condition and financial barriers. However, one day, a glimmer of hope emerged when Hellen’s father crossed paths with a young boy who had once faced a similar challenge but had now fully recovered. Filled with renewed hope, he inquired about how this transformation had occurred. The boy’s story revealed the existence of our medical partner's care center to Hellen’s father. Filled with optimism, he hurried home and shared this life-altering discovery with his wife. Together, they decided to bring their precious daughter and three of her siblings to The Plaster House. Hellen’s mother says: “I am glad there is a chance for my daughter to get treatment, I hope she doesn't have to live with this disability for the rest of her life.”

$935raised
Fully funded