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Success! Mwase from Malawi raised $733 to fund prostate surgery.

Mwase
100%
  • $733 raised, $0 to go
$733
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Mwase's treatment was fully funded on June 26, 2019.

Photo of Mwase post-operation

March 28, 2019

Mwase underwent prostate surgery.

He is feeling good and looks forward to going home to care for his crops. He is currently growing ground nuts on his farm which can be sold to support his family.

He is feeling good and looks forward to going home to care for his crops. He is currently growing ground nuts on his farm which can be sold ...

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March 20, 2019

Mwase is a farmer who lives with his wife and two children in Malawi. He spends his days working hard on his farm, so in his free time he enjoys just sitting and relaxing.

Since November of last year, Mwase has been experiencing urinary difficulty. These symptoms are caused by an enlarged prostate, a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia. He needs to undergo a prostate resection surgery, a procedure in which surgeons will remove part of the enlarged gland.

Our medical partner, World Altering Medicine, is requesting $733 to fund Mwase’s surgery. On March 21, he will undergo prostate surgery at Nkhoma Hospital, our medical partner’s care center. The requested money pays for supplies, medications, and two weeks of hospital stay.

He says, “This program is helping me very much and I really appreciate this help. Thank you!”

Mwase is a farmer who lives with his wife and two children in Malawi. He spends his days working hard on his farm, so in his free time he en...

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Mwase's Timeline

  • March 20, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Mwase was submitted by Angela Quashigah at World Altering Medicine, our medical partner in Malawi.

  • March 21, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Mwase received treatment at Nkhoma Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 21, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Mwase's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 28, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Mwase's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • June 26, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Mwase's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 13 donors

Funded by 13 donors

Treatment
Colon / Prostate Resection
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $733 for Mwase's treatment
Hospital Fees
$480
Medical Staff
$12
Medication
$231
Supplies
$0
Travel
$7
Labs
$3
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The primary condition treated with this surgery is benign overgrowth of the prostate, called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patients generally present with urinary symptoms, including difficulty or inability to pass urine, urination frequency, passing very small amounts of urine, or passing urine very slowly. Some patients experience pain when trying to pass urine.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Most Malawians live in rural areas, and a large percentage of them work as farmers. This is also true of our medical partner's patient population. When men are experiencing symptoms related to BPH, they often have a hard time working on their farms. They are therefore unable to support themselves and their families. Before receiving surgery, many men will have a catheter placed, which can be uncomfortable and embarrassing. Additionally, using a catheter for a prolonged period of time can lead to infection or trauma to the area.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Although experiencing symptoms associated with BPH is not commonly viewed as taboo within our medical partner's patient population, it is rarely discussed. Men can feel embarrassment about the condition and the impact it has on their lives. Some men experience psychological effects from the condition.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The standard treatment is a prostate resection, which is a fairly standard procedure. After the surgery, the patient will use a catheter for 14 days. Once the catheter is removed and the patient can pass urine freely, they can be discharged.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

If the treatment goes smoothly, it is expected that healthy patients will make a full recovery and not relapse.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Although there are risks associated with any surgical procedure, the risks associated with a prostate resection are very low. However, as the patient population tends to be of older age, it is common that patients have other underlying conditions, such as high blood pressure. Patients who are candidates for this surgery are screened and monitored carefully. If a patient is found to have another health condition that could jeopardize their health during or after the surgery, that condition is addressed first.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In the area of our medical partner's treatment center, there is one central, public hospital. That hospital provides surgical services, but barriers exist. A patient requiring a hernia repair could be on a waitlist for years at the central hospital, or be sent home and told to return a number of times. For this reason, treatment can be very difficult to obtain at the public hospital. In addition to our medical partner's treatment center and the central hospital, there are private clinics that would provide this service, but at a high fee. Our medical partner's treatment center, Nkhoma, is a great option for patients because they are able to receive quality treatment.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Drugs can be used to relieve symptoms for a short period of time, but ultimately, surgery is the only treatment.

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Tushabomwe

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Titus

Titus, a happy 7-year old boy, was born and raised in Kapsabaa Village in Kenya. He is in first grade. He was well until the 8th of April, when he was pushed by a friend when they were playing together and hit the hard ground, injuring his left hand. Accompanied by his mother, Titus had to travel for several hours to get from their home to Watsi's partner hospital to be seen by doctors. His family was referred from a government hospital because they were unable to treat him due to lack of financial means. Very quickly after arriving at our partner hospital, an X-ray was done and confirmed a left supracondylar fracture. Due to pain and discomfort, Titus was admitted and scheduled for surgery. Titus is the second born in a family of four children. His mother is a grocer while his father is a mason. They both work hard to better their young family despite the fact that his father does not have a stable job as he only can wait for construction, which is rare in the village. The family has not been saving any money because they earn a little, which is enough to feed their family and gather for a few basic needs for their children. The young family lives in a rental house in the village centre. The injury has caused Titus’s parents a lot of worry about their son’s future because the fracture has made it difficult for Titus to use his hand. The young family is requesting for financial support to help their son undergo surgery to fix his broken hand and reduce chances of complications of healing badly and persistent pain. Gladys, Titus's Mother, says: “We were lacking means but we were given hope of finding treatment for our son when we came here. I am looking forward to seeing him not in pain again.”

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