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Success! Kabugho from Uganda raised $220 for hernia repair surgery.

Kabugho
100%
  • $220 raised, $0 to go
$220
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Kabugho's treatment was fully funded on June 13, 2016.

Photo of Kabugho post-operation

July 7, 2016

Kabugho received successful hernia repair surgery.

Kabugho is no longer at risk of intestinal obstruction, incarceration, and strangulation. After recovery she will be able to travel with ease and run her businesses. She was discharged and is expected to make a full recovery.

“I feel well apart from the pain on the part where I had surgery,” Kabugho shared. “I am excited about recovering and be able to do business and travel Congo for my cooking oil business. Thanks you very much for the assistance you have given me.”

Kabugho is no longer at risk of intestinal obstruction, incarceration, and strangulation. After recovery she will be able to travel with eas...

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May 30, 2016

Kabugho is a 34-year-old single mother, who has been raising her four children on her own. Her husband passed away in a motor accident. Currently, all of her children are in school. In the past, she has paid for their education and food by selling cooking oil.

Lately, physical labor—even the minor body movements involved in running her cooking oil business—has been difficult for Kabugho. She developed a swelling in her right groin region two years ago. After visiting several hospitals, she was diagnosed with a hernia. This lump causes her pain and constipation, and makes it hard for her to work. Without the income she earns selling oil, Kabugho is worried her children will drop out of school.

Furthermore, if she is not treated soon, Kabugho’s hernia could cause intestinal obstruction, incarceration or strangulation—potentially deadly conditions where parts of the tissue become cut off from blood flow.

Kabugho’s doctors have urged her to have surgery to correct her hernia. She cannot afford to pay for this operation herself: “I am unable to pay for my surgery because I spend the little money I get on feeding and educating my children,” she explains. But that doesn’t mean Kabugho has to go without healthcare. For $220 we can sponsor the hernia repair surgery, hospital stay, and medications she needs to recover fully from her hernia.

After surgery, Kabugho hopes the pain will stop and she will be able to continue with her cooking oil business. She even plans to start other businesses if she gets capital. Let’s restore this mother to a position of basic physical comfort and earning potential.

Kabugho is a 34-year-old single mother, who has been raising her four children on her own. Her husband passed away in a motor accident. Curr...

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Kabugho's Timeline

  • May 30, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Kabugho was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • June 8, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Kabugho received treatment at Holy Family Virika Hospital in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • June 12, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Kabugho's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 13, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Kabugho's treatment was fully funded.

  • July 7, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Kabugho's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 2 donors

Profile 48x48 2017 cropped

Funded by 2 donors

Profile 48x48 2017 cropped
Treatment
Hernia Repair
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A hernia occurs when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the lower abdominal wall, usually for one of two reasons. The first is a congenital abnormality in which the tissues did not close. The second is excessive stress in an adult, often due to heavy physical labor or pregnancy. Patients experience a bulge or lump in the affected area. The hernia may cause the patient to feel pain, discomfort, weakness, pressure, and sensations of heaviness or aching. These symptoms are often exacerbated when the patient coughs, bends over, or lifts heavy objects. In some cases, hernias have no symptoms and are only detected during routine medical exams.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with uncomplicated hernias may experience only annoyance or discomfort. As the hernia opening expands, the discomfort will increase. Small openings are more likely to trap the intestine, potentially leading to intestinal damage or death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hernias are common in Africa. People often do very hard physical labor and lift heavy objects. Women tend to have more children than those in the United States. It is possible that some hernias have infectious or genetic causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts for three to eight hours, depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient will stay in the hospital anywhere from two days to eight weeks, again depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment is curative. The chance of intestinal strangulation or bowel obstruction reduces significantly.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Hernia repair is not a risky procedure, and it comes with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many patients will ignore a hernia until it becomes uncomfortable and seek care at that time. Some people will wear tighter pants or a tight band around the waist to prevent the intestine from protruding.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If the hernia is not “stuck,” patients tend to ignore it and adapt to living with it. However, this could lead to future complications.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Nchambi

Nchambi is a bright and creative 8-year-old student. She is the fifth born in a family of seven children from her mother. She is currently in class six, but she unfortunately had to stop her studies to seek treatment for her condition. Some of her favorite subjects in school are arts and crafts, social studies, and mathematics. Nchambi was diagnosed with left genu varus, meaning her left leg is bent at the knee, making it difficult to walk. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, she struggles with walking to school and carrying out her daily life activities, such as helping her mother with small home chores like cleaning cloths, washing plates, and sweeping. They shared that fetching water is now something she cannot do at all due to her leg condition. Recently, every morning before school, Nchambi has had to wake up extra early to prepare because it takes her a long time to make the one-kilometer walk to her school. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Nchambi. The procedure is scheduled to take place on July 5th. Treatment will hopefully restore Nchambi's mobility, allowing her to participate in a variety of activities and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Nchambi shares, “I can’t catch up with my friends when walking to school because I am slow. I can’t walk as fast as them because of my leg.”

34% funded

34%funded
$300raised
$580to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Nchambi

Nchambi is a bright and creative 8-year-old student. She is the fifth born in a family of seven children from her mother. She is currently in class six, but she unfortunately had to stop her studies to seek treatment for her condition. Some of her favorite subjects in school are arts and crafts, social studies, and mathematics. Nchambi was diagnosed with left genu varus, meaning her left leg is bent at the knee, making it difficult to walk. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, she struggles with walking to school and carrying out her daily life activities, such as helping her mother with small home chores like cleaning cloths, washing plates, and sweeping. They shared that fetching water is now something she cannot do at all due to her leg condition. Recently, every morning before school, Nchambi has had to wake up extra early to prepare because it takes her a long time to make the one-kilometer walk to her school. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Nchambi. The procedure is scheduled to take place on July 5th. Treatment will hopefully restore Nchambi's mobility, allowing her to participate in a variety of activities and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Nchambi shares, “I can’t catch up with my friends when walking to school because I am slow. I can’t walk as fast as them because of my leg.”

34% funded

34%funded
$300raised
$580to go