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Success! Vutha from Cambodia raised $314 to fund eye surgery.

Vutha
100%
  • $314 raised, $0 to go
$314
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Vutha's treatment was fully funded on July 15, 2021.

Photo of Vutha post-operation

July 9, 2021

Vutha underwent eye surgery.

Vutha’s surgery was a success and his eyes look and feel well finally. He will rest for a few days and apply eye drops to decrease the risk of infection. With a shy smile, Vutha shares that he won’t feel self-conscious anymore and is relieved he won’t need to experience taunting from other children about his eye. Vutha wanted us to know that he will work hard in school with his newfound confidence.

His father said, “I am proud of Vutha for getting this surgery so he can do better in school and not be self-conscious about his appearance.”

Vutha's surgery was a success and his eyes look and feel well finally. He will rest for a few days and apply eye drops to decrease the risk ...

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May 25, 2021

Vutha is a 10-year-old student in the fourth grade. His father is a policeman, while is mother cares for him and his siblings. He has four siblings. At school, Vutha enjoys reading the most, but he also works hard at math. When not in class, he and his friends play soccer as much as they can.

Vutha has strabismus in his right eye. Strabismus is a misalignment of the eye caused by injury or dysfunction in the associated nerves and muscles. It is difficult for him to see clearly and study. It is also becoming more difficult for him to play sports with his friends.

Vutha traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On May 25th, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), will perform a corrective procedure to align his eyes. Now, Vutha needs help to raise $314 to fund this procedure.

Vutha said, “After surgery I want to see well like my friends. I think I will be even better at reading too when this surgery is done.”

Vutha is a 10-year-old student in the fourth grade. His father is a policeman, while is mother cares for him and his siblings. He has four s...

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Vutha's Timeline

  • May 25, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Vutha was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • May 25, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Vutha received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 25, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Vutha's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 9, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Vutha's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • July 15, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Vutha's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 11 donors

Funded by 11 donors

Treatment
Squint / Strabismus
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $314 for Vutha's treatment
Hospital Fees
$62
Medical Staff
$212
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A strabismus is a condition in which the eyes are not properly aligned with each other. This can cause decreased vision in children and double vision in adults.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

In children, strabismus can cause amblyopia, or lazy eye, where the vision development is stunted. If not treated early enough, amblyopia can cause permanent decreased vision or blindness. In adults, strabismus can cause double vision, which can be severely debilitating. In addition to headaches and eye strain, symptoms may include an inability to read comfortably, fatigue when reading, and unstable or "jittery" vision. Notably, strabismus interferes with normal eye contact, often causing embarrassment, anger, and feelings of awkwardness. It affects social communication in a fundamental way, with a possible negative effect on self esteem. One study showed that the behavior of strabismic children was marked by inhibition, anxiety, and emotional disorders.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The etiology for strabismus in children is poorly understood. Strabismus affects children worldwide and is reported to be present in about 4% of children.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgeons identify and move muscles in the eye in order to straighten the eye. The conjunctiva (clear covering of the white part of the eye) is opened to reveal the muscle and then closed. This is usually done under general anesthesia.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

For children, straightening the eyes can help treat amblyopia and allow the pathway from the eyes to the brain to develop normally. For adults, straightening the eyes will improve double vision.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Strabismus surgery can cure the problem. The risk of surgery is low. Certain congenital disorders and syndromes can present with strabismus. In this case, children are fully evaluated by medical specialists.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Strabismus is primarily a surgical problem. Many patients travel from far provinces to our medical partner because they cannot receive this care locally.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Some strabismus can be treated with glasses or prisms, but surgery is usually needed.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Elinipa

Elinipa is a beautiful two-year-old girl. She is an incredibly friendly child who loves to play with her five older siblings. At birth, she was a healthy child. It wasn't until she was learning to walk however, that her mother noticed that her legs were slightly curved, yet even so they did not seek treatment assuming it was a minor problem that she would outgrow. Elinipa has now been diagnosed with bilateral valgus, which is a condition caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result of her condition, Elinipa's legs bow inward to the point that her knees touch. This makes walking persistently more difficult as she continues to grow. Through our medical partner's outreach program her parents learned that their daughter needs surgery to correct her legs. Elinipa's parents are small scale famers who depend entirely on what they harvest to make a living. As a result, their income is not enough to afford to take Elinipa to the hospital to treat her condition. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Elinipa. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 13th at our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. With this treatment Elinipa's mobility will hopefully be restored, thus allowing her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decreasing her risk of future complications. Elinipa’s father says, “I am worried with how her legs continue to bend inward. Please help us.”

29% funded

29%funded
$260raised
$620to go
Phyo Ko

Phyo Ko is a 33-year-old man. He lives with his wife, son and daughter in Mae Tao Village in Thailand. Originally from across the border in Burma, he moved to Thailand in search of better job opportunities in 2009. Phyo Ko’s wife is a homemaker and their children are too young to attend school. Phyo Ko works as a construction day labourer and he earns 350 baht (approx. 11.67 USD) per day. However, recently he has not been able to work frequently because of pain in his left thigh. In the beginning of 2021, Phyo Ko and his friend were working at a construction site in Mae Sot. While working, the scaffolding fell onto his left hand and his left thigh. After the accident, his hand and his thigh started to hurt. Once he applied oil made from traditional medicine to his hand and thigh, the pain stopped. One month after the accident, his lower left thigh became swollen and a mass appeared above his knee on the front of his thigh. A doctor at Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) performed a physical examination and told him that there was nothing wrong with his thigh and did not give him any medication. Once he went home, Phyo Ko continued to apply the oil made from traditional medicine on his thigh. However, the mass did not disappear. When his mass started to increase in size a few months later, his wife told him to go back to the hospital. When Phyo Ko went back to the hospital, there were no doctors available to see him in the outpatient department because of an increase of COVID-19 cases in the Mae Sot. He went home and continued to apply oil even though he felt it was not helping him. Over the last few weeks the pain in his thigh worsened and now he can no longer work. Doctors want Phyo Ko to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Phyo Ko's CT scan and care, scheduled for April 29th. Phyo Ko said, “I would like to recover quickly because I cannot work since I suffer from this disease. Now, my family has no income and I am worried that I will not be able to support my family anymore.” In his free time, Phyo Ko likes to play with his children. “When I recover, I will work hard to pay back my debt to the neighbours we borrowed the money from. I want to live with my family for a long time and I want to support my family,” he said.

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$414to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Elinipa

Elinipa is a beautiful two-year-old girl. She is an incredibly friendly child who loves to play with her five older siblings. At birth, she was a healthy child. It wasn't until she was learning to walk however, that her mother noticed that her legs were slightly curved, yet even so they did not seek treatment assuming it was a minor problem that she would outgrow. Elinipa has now been diagnosed with bilateral valgus, which is a condition caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result of her condition, Elinipa's legs bow inward to the point that her knees touch. This makes walking persistently more difficult as she continues to grow. Through our medical partner's outreach program her parents learned that their daughter needs surgery to correct her legs. Elinipa's parents are small scale famers who depend entirely on what they harvest to make a living. As a result, their income is not enough to afford to take Elinipa to the hospital to treat her condition. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Elinipa. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 13th at our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. With this treatment Elinipa's mobility will hopefully be restored, thus allowing her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decreasing her risk of future complications. Elinipa’s father says, “I am worried with how her legs continue to bend inward. Please help us.”

29% funded

29%funded
$260raised
$620to go