#GiveTheGiftOfHealth for #GivingTuesday

Meet another patient

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Success! Tha Shee from Thailand raised $1,500 to fund heart surgery.

Tha Shee
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Tha Shee's treatment was fully funded on September 25, 2018.

Photo of Tha Shee post-operation

September 13, 2018

Tha Shee underwent heart surgery.

Since Tha Shee received the surgery, her condition has improved significantly. She no longer experiences heart palpitations or rapid breathing.

Tha Shee said, “I am extremely happy that I am healthy again.”

Since Tha Shee received the surgery, her condition has improved significantly. She no longer experiences heart palpitations or rapid breathi...

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July 31, 2018

Tha Shee is a 35-year-old woman who lives with her husband, four daughters, son, and grandchild in Mae La Refugee Camp, Tak Province, Thailand.

Nine years ago, Tha Shee started to feel tired when she walked and worked. After two years, her condition got worse, and she decided to visit the hospital in the camp. There, a medic gave her medication that did not improve her condition.

Finally, she went back to the same hospital, and an ultrasound test revealed that she has a heart problem and that she needs surgery. They referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF).

Now, Tha Shee is scheduled for surgery on August 8 to repair her heart condition called atrial septal defect closure. She needs help raising $1,500.

She says, “I am not able to work nor to do any household chores because of my condition. My family suffers from a lower monthly income, and my children have to take over the household chores. I hope to get better soon and work hard after my treatment to save up money.”

Tha Shee is a 35-year-old woman who lives with her husband, four daughters, son, and grandchild in Mae La Refugee Camp, Tak Province, Thaila...

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Tha Shee's Timeline

  • July 31, 2018
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Tha Shee was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Thailand.

  • August 08, 2018
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Tha Shee received treatment at Lampang Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 09, 2018
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Tha Shee's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 13, 2018
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Tha Shee's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • September 25, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Tha Shee's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 32 donors

Treatment
ASD Closure
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $7,825 for Tha Shee's treatment
Subsidies fund $6,325 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,009
Medical Staff
$721
Medication
$39
Supplies
$4,994
Travel
$580
Labs
$84
Radiology
$312
Other
$86
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, cyanosis (a blue tinge to the skin), clubbed fingernails, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Burma has a long queue of congenital cardiac patients who need surgery. With only four fully trained cardiac surgeons in Burma, children with congenital heart defects may have extreme difficulty accessing treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Doctors may combine catheter and surgical procedures to repair complex congenital heart defects. If the defect cannot be fixed with a catheter, the patient will undergo an open heart surgery to close holes in the heart.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Joseph

Joseph is a 19-year-old joyful boy who hails from the Mount Elgon area in Kenya. He shared that he is known around the village as the guy with the large mass due to his protruding hernia on his abdomen. In February 2019, Joseph was involved in a road traffic accident when he was headed home from his daily labor. He sustained injuries in his stomach where he was rushed to a hospital and an exploratory laparotomy was done. A few days later, Joseph was discharged from hospital and as his wounds were healing he started developing a mass on his stomach. Joseph feared to go to the hospital again because he didn’t want to be in pain. As the mass grew bigger, Joseph started worrying about his life. He went to his church pastor where the church raised money to send him to the capital city to get it removed but they were told he needed a specialist who demanded a lot of money which they could not afford. Joseph had given up on the possibility of getting treated. It was not until a friend asked his pastor to bring him to our hospital, where he was diagnosed with an incisional hernia that he was happy to be told that his condition can be treated. Joseph's father died of illness while he was young. He dropped out of school in Grade 4 because his mother re-married and she didn't have money to send him to school, so he began to work in farms to help get money for his daily needs like food. Joseph works in the farms and gardens and enjoys planting and farming. He wants to be able to have a big farm and grow lots of vegetables, corn, and millet. Joseph has gone to other doctors to help with his mass but everyone said it wasn’t operable. He is most disturbed by the way people who stare at him. Joseph is a very practical man and looks forward to going back to his farm and working hard to have a good crop and harvest and have a good life. Joseph is worried that he might not get a wife due to his condition. He is also facing stigma by people talking about his condition and has been denied work. If he is not treated, his condition will continue to worsen and his future plans feel bleak to him if he does not get treatment. Joseph told us, “I just want to be able to find a girl to marry and have a family.”

39% funded

39%funded
$185raised
$286to go
Jane

Jane is a 70-year-old kiosk owner from Kenya. She is a former civil servant who was released from government duty in 2000. Since then, she has since been running a small kiosk that sells vegetables and other groceries. In March 2019, Jane suffered a fracture on her left distal femur with intraarticular extension, meaning the break crossed into the surface of a joint. To remedy this, she underwent surgery with a locking plate. However, the fracture has not healed properly, which threatens her mobility. Doctors are now recommending a another fracture repair surgery to prevent future complications of her condition, including inability to walk. However, this procedure is costly for Jane. The profit she earns from her small business is not enough to cover her basic needs, let alone her medical bills. Jane has been relying on a small government pension to get by. She separated from her husband over 30 years ago and has since been raising her only son alone. Her son is an adult, but lacks a stable job and works as a casual laborer to make ends meet. Thus, Jane is appealing for financial help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 11th, Jane will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After recovering, she will no longer have difficulties in walking or be in constant pain. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Jane shared, “I need this surgery to get back on my feet. I am the one taking care of my grandkids since my son has no job. This procedure will help me be able to go get vegetables from the market so that I can sell and continue my business.”

69% funded

69%funded
$1,038raised
$462to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Joseph

Joseph is a 19-year-old joyful boy who hails from the Mount Elgon area in Kenya. He shared that he is known around the village as the guy with the large mass due to his protruding hernia on his abdomen. In February 2019, Joseph was involved in a road traffic accident when he was headed home from his daily labor. He sustained injuries in his stomach where he was rushed to a hospital and an exploratory laparotomy was done. A few days later, Joseph was discharged from hospital and as his wounds were healing he started developing a mass on his stomach. Joseph feared to go to the hospital again because he didn’t want to be in pain. As the mass grew bigger, Joseph started worrying about his life. He went to his church pastor where the church raised money to send him to the capital city to get it removed but they were told he needed a specialist who demanded a lot of money which they could not afford. Joseph had given up on the possibility of getting treated. It was not until a friend asked his pastor to bring him to our hospital, where he was diagnosed with an incisional hernia that he was happy to be told that his condition can be treated. Joseph's father died of illness while he was young. He dropped out of school in Grade 4 because his mother re-married and she didn't have money to send him to school, so he began to work in farms to help get money for his daily needs like food. Joseph works in the farms and gardens and enjoys planting and farming. He wants to be able to have a big farm and grow lots of vegetables, corn, and millet. Joseph has gone to other doctors to help with his mass but everyone said it wasn’t operable. He is most disturbed by the way people who stare at him. Joseph is a very practical man and looks forward to going back to his farm and working hard to have a good crop and harvest and have a good life. Joseph is worried that he might not get a wife due to his condition. He is also facing stigma by people talking about his condition and has been denied work. If he is not treated, his condition will continue to worsen and his future plans feel bleak to him if he does not get treatment. Joseph told us, “I just want to be able to find a girl to marry and have a family.”

39% funded

39%funded
$185raised
$286to go