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Success! Patricia from Kenya raised $816 to fund a mastectomy.

Patricia
100%
  • $816 raised, $0 to go
$816
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Patricia's treatment was fully funded on December 30, 2019.

Photo of Patricia post-operation

February 2, 2020

Patricia underwent a mastectomy.

Patricia had a successful surgery and despite the emotions that accompany the condition, she is glad there was a solution to this and she was able to access financial help.

“I can now focus on my business to get my children back to school. I am obliged to Watsi supporters for the philanthropic help despite not having met them,” says Patricia.

Patricia had a successful surgery and despite the emotions that accompany the condition, she is glad there was a solution to this and she wa...

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September 4, 2019

Patricia is a mother of three from Kenya. Patricia noted a breast lump 16 years ago which had been dismissed as fatty tissue. Fast forward to 2019, the lump size increased and was painful. She had a mammogram done followed by a breast lumpectomy in our facility. Pathology report indicated a malignant tumor which if not treated will result into metastasis. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been suggested to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing.

Patricia is a single mother of three children. Two of her children are out of school due to lack of school fees. She used to work as a house keeper but her contract ended 2 years ago. She had to close her grocery shop 2 months ago after persistent pain. Currently, her daily needs are met by her sister. She is not able to raise the funds needed for surgery and appeals for help.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $816 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Patricia. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 10. After treatment, Patricia will hopefully return to a cancer-free life.

Patricia says, “My hope and prayer is to be treated and be able to engage in some business to sustain my children”.

Patricia is a mother of three from Kenya. Patricia noted a breast lump 16 years ago which had been dismissed as fatty tissue. Fast forward t...

Read more

Patricia's Timeline

  • September 4, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Patricia was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • September 10, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Patricia received treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 10, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Patricia's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 30, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Patricia's treatment was fully funded.

  • February 02, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Patricia's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Mastectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $816 for Patricia's treatment
Hospital Fees
$763
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$5
Supplies
$0
Labs
$9
Other
$39
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A mastectomy is a surgery to remove the breast or part of the breast and is usually performed to treat breast cancer. Common symptoms of breast cancer include a lump or swelling in all or part of the breast, skin irritation or dimpling, pain, discharge, redness, and thickening of the skin.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If breast cancer is not treated, the cancer may spread to other organs, potentially leading to early death. Untreated breast cancer can also lead to pain and infection within the breast.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Breast cancer is the leading cancer in women in Kenya (34 per 100,000). It has been identified as the number one killer of women aged 35-55 years. Late diagnosis is the main reason for high mortality.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient reports to the hospital, and lab work is done. The following day, the patient goes into the operating room for surgery. The patient stays in the hospital ward for three to seven days. The surgery is considered a success if the wound heals cleanly. The patient is then discharged from the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment is curative if the cancer has not spread widely. Usually, this surgery is not performed if the cancer has already spread. Sometimes, doctors are unable to determine if the cancer has spread until they perform post-operative lymph node testing.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There are very few side effects or risks if the condition is diagnosed and treated before the cancer has spread widely.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In Africa, there is limited capacity to treat breast cancer. Many cancers are diagnosed in advanced stages due to the limited number of diagnostic and treatment centers.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For early-stage breast cancer, a “lumpectomy” surgery may be adequate. Additional radiation therapy will be required for cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Joseph

Joseph is a 19-year-old joyful boy who hails from the Mount Elgon area in Kenya. He shared that he is known around the village as the guy with the large mass due to his protruding hernia on his abdomen. In February 2019, Joseph was involved in a road traffic accident when he was headed home from his daily labor. He sustained injuries in his stomach where he was rushed to a hospital and an exploratory laparotomy was done. A few days later, Joseph was discharged from hospital and as his wounds were healing he started developing a mass on his stomach. Joseph feared to go to the hospital again because he didn’t want to be in pain. As the mass grew bigger, Joseph started worrying about his life. He went to his church pastor where the church raised money to send him to the capital city to get it removed but they were told he needed a specialist who demanded a lot of money which they could not afford. Joseph had given up on the possibility of getting treated. It was not until a friend asked his pastor to bring him to our hospital, where he was diagnosed with an incisional hernia that he was happy to be told that his condition can be treated. Joseph's father died of illness while he was young. He dropped out of school in Grade 4 because his mother re-married and she didn't have money to send him to school, so he began to work in farms to help get money for his daily needs like food. Joseph works in the farms and gardens and enjoys planting and farming. He wants to be able to have a big farm and grow lots of vegetables, corn, and millet. Joseph has gone to other doctors to help with his mass but everyone said it wasn’t operable. He is most disturbed by the way people who stare at him. Joseph is a very practical man and looks forward to going back to his farm and working hard to have a good crop and harvest and have a good life. Joseph is worried that he might not get a wife due to his condition. He is also facing stigma by people talking about his condition and has been denied work. If he is not treated, his condition will continue to worsen and his future plans feel bleak to him if he does not get treatment. Joseph told us, “I just want to be able to find a girl to marry and have a family.”

32% funded

32%funded
$155raised
$316to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.