Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Success! San from Burma raised $1,500 to fund cardiac surgery to replace her heart valve.

San
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
San's treatment was fully funded on December 21, 2021.

Photo of San post-operation

December 29, 2021

San underwent cardiac surgery and is recovering well.

Before surgery San felt tired and had heart palpitations when she walked even a short distance. She experienced chest pain and and could not sleep well. After her surgery, San is relieved that she no longer feels tired and her heart palpitation is gone. She can walk longer distances and can sleep well now. Her appetite has returned and she does not experience any of her old symptoms.

San told us, “I would like to share special thanks to the donors and BCMF organization that helped me with my treatment cost. Without donors and BCMF help, I would have had to sell my house and land to get treatment.” She added, “There is no one in my village who has a heart condition like me. My family and villagers are overjoyed at the success of my surgery. In the future, I have a plan to open a grocery store to earn extra income while living at home. I did not finish my education, so I want my daughter and son to become an educated people. I also want to support them until the end of their education.”

San’s husband said, “Our family is thinking of and praying for all the donors and donor’s families, may you always have a healthy and happy life.”

Before surgery San felt tired and had heart palpitations when she walked even a short distance. She experienced chest pain and and could not...

Read more
October 3, 2021

San is a 41-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, and son in Burma. Her children are students, but the schools are closed due to a COVID-19 outbreak and teachers’ strike against the military coup earlier this year.

San and her husband rent land and grow sesame and sunflowers. They shared that their income last year from selling their harvest was about 1,500,000 kyat (approx. $1,500 USD) for the year, which is only enough to cover their daily expenses and basic health care. Unfortunately, the rainy season was late this year, and they could not grow any sesame as a result. San’s family is worried about the impact this will have on their income and their family.

Starting in May, San felt tired and developed a fever, so she visited the local clinic and received medication for her symptoms. While her fever reduced, she still felt tired, and her heartbeat increased. Three days later, her son developed a fever and also went to the local clinic. While there, San was able to share more about her condition with the clinicians. The doctor listened to her heart, gave her an injection and medication, and told her to come back if she continued to feel unwell. That night, San experienced heart palpitations and could not sit or lie down for long periods.

On May 29th, she visited the Magway General Hospital, where she received oxygen, an injection, a blood test, and an electrocardiogram (ECG). Doctors also recommended an echocardiogram and a chest x-ray, which she received in follow-up care on May 31st. After reviewing the results of her tests, the doctors shared that San’s heart valve does not work well and suggested meeting with a cardiologist for further testing. While the military coup made it challenging to find a cardiologist, San visited her brother’s town for treatment. After further testing, a cardiologist diagnosed San with mitral valve stenosis and told her that she needed surgery to replace a damaged heart valve. Currently, San feels tired and suffers from heart palpitations when she walks short distances and cannot lie down for long periods.

Fortunately, San was referred to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), to help afford her surgery. On October 3rd, San will receive treatment, and BCMF is requesting $1,500 to help directly fund her procedure.

San said, “I would like to get better soon because my family had to try hard to borrow enough money for my treatment. This year, we will not be able to earn a profit from our farm. This year is very difficult for everyone. I would like my daughter and son to finish their studies. I would like to work hard for my family’s future. After I recover from my operation, I want to open a shop in my village to earn more money. I will try to send my daughter and son to school until they graduate. Thank you so much for supporting the cost of my surgery.”

San is a 41-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, and son in Burma. Her children are students, but the schools are closed due...

Read more

San's Timeline

  • October 3, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    San was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • October 3, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    San received treatment at Pun Hlaing Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 4, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    San's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 21, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    San's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 29, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    San's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Mitral Valve Replacement
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $8,056 for San's treatment
Subsidies fund $6,556 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,850
Medical Staff
$866
Medication
$0
Supplies
$4,678
Labs
$100
Radiology
$15
Other
$547
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Patients often cannot afford to go to the hospital. Many people rely on medications provided by dealers who are not authorized pharmacists.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Damaged valves are repaired and replaced during open heart surgery. The surgeon will remove the current damaged heart valve and replaced it by either a mechanical or tissue valve. The surgery team will remove the heart-lung machine. The team will wire the breastbone back together and will then sew or staple the incision in the patient's skin back together.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Venesa

Meet Venesa, a beautiful two year old girl. She was born at home with a swelling at the lower part of her back, and with legs that were not straight like other babies their family knew. The day after she was born, Venesa's parents took her to the hospital, where she was diagnosed with spina bifida and clubfoot. The family was advised to wait until Venesa turned nine months old, before having her undergo the surgery that she needs. Although surgery was deemed urgent, when Venesa was finally old enough, her parents couldn't afford to pay for it. Then, about a year ago, Venesa was diagnosed with hydrocephalus. Venesa's mom shared that shortly after this last diagnosis, Venesa's father abandoned the family and is not involved in helping support them any more. Venesa's mother used to work at a salon, but after Venesa's birth, she has been unable to work. They are now living with Venesa's grandmother, who does what she can to help. Without surgery for her spina bifida, Venesa risks paralysis of her lower limbs, infection of the exposed nerve tissue, and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,151 to cover the cost of Venesa's spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 14th, at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital. This procedure will hopefully spare Venesa from the risks associated with her condition, allowing her to experience a strong and healthy life. Venesa’s mother says: “Since she was born, I have no peace knowing that I can’t afford her treatment.”

56% funded

56%funded
$652raised
$499to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.