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Success! Seav Heng from Cambodia raised $398 to fund syndactyly hand surgery.

Seav Heng
100%
  • $398 raised, $0 to go
$398
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Seav Heng's treatment was fully funded on December 23, 2020.

Photo of Seav Heng post-operation

December 24, 2020

Seav Heng underwent syndactyly hand surgery.

Seav Heng’s procedure was successful, and his wound has healed. He will have a short course of physiotherapy to ensure he has a full range of movement in his hand. Once he has fully recovered, he will have full use of all his fingers.

Seav Heng’s mother said, “I am very happy that my son’s operation was done successfully, and now he can move his fingers better. He will get to write, eat, and enjoy playing with his friends again.”

Seav Heng's procedure was successful, and his wound has healed. He will have a short course of physiotherapy to ensure he has a full range o...

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September 25, 2020

Seav Heng is a one-year-old baby boy from Cambodia with one older brother in 1st grade. His parents are rice and potato farmers. Seav Heng enjoys playing with toys with his older brother and going outside with his parents. His family traveled seven hours to reach our medical partner Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC).

Seav Heng was born with syndactyly of his right hand. This means that Seav Heng’s middle and ring fingers are fused together, making it difficult for him to use his right hand to hold objects and do other tasks.

Fortunately, on September 25th, surgeons will perform a syndactyly repair procedure to separate and release the fused digits. Our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, is requesting $398 to fund this procedure. After surgery, the conjoined digits of his hand will be permanently separated and he will be able to use his hand easily.

His mother said, “I hope he will be able to use his hand easily and one day be able to learn how to write.”

Seav Heng is a one-year-old baby boy from Cambodia with one older brother in 1st grade. His parents are rice and potato farmers. Seav Heng e...

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Seav Heng's Timeline

  • September 25, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Seav Heng was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • September 25, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Seav Heng received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 27, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Seav Heng's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 23, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Seav Heng's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 24, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Seav Heng's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Syndactyly Repair
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $398 for Seav Heng's treatment
Hospital Fees
$45
Medical Staff
$305
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients have webbed fingers or toes, or several of their digits are completely fused together.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients often have difficulty grasping objects and using their hands or feet. In addition, many patients feel uncomfortable about the appearance of the condition.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

This condition may be caused by increased exposure to chemicals. According to local doctors, the proportion of babies born with disabilities and congenital deformities in eastern Cambodia (bordering Vietnam) is more than 50 times higher than in other parts of the country. Though the reason for the higher rate has not officially been confirmed, it is generally thought to result from the use of Agent Orange, a dioxin-containing defoliant, by U.S. forces during the Vietnam War.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

A z-plasty surgery is performed to separate the skin between the digits. Because the circumference of the conjoined fingers is smaller than the circumference of the separated fingers, new skin is brought into the area by a skin graft.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Patients will experience improved mobility and function, reduced pain, and increased self-esteem and confidence.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

The treatment usually results in a good outcome. If a patient’s condition is particularly difficult, surgeries are scheduled during visits by hand specialists from Singapore and Hong Kong. In addition, our medical partner belongs to a hand and upper limb-specific telemedicine group. A network of specialists from around the world can offer opinions about difficult cases.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

The healthcare system in Cambodia is underdeveloped. Cambodians rely on government hospitals, which are often ill-equipped and lack capacity and expertise for standard surgical care.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There is no alternative.

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Sarafina

Sarafina is a small scale farmer and a mother of six, with five living children. She shared with us that she attended school up to the first grade when she was young and since has farmed, while her husband is a retired soldier. They own a three-room semi-permanent house for shelter. Their oldest child is now 45 years old and dropped out of school due to mental illness while their youngest recently got married. Sarafina receives a little support from her children and relies on her farm produce to meet her daily needs. For two years, Sarafina has been experiencing lower abdominal pains along with itchy arms. She used herbal medication for the itching but she never got relief. She visited Rugarama Hospital and the scan showed uterine fibroids. Sarafina has stopped farming because she can no longer bend down, and has had to miss some follow-up appointments due to limited funds. Her symptoms have worsened and she has been diagnosed with large uterine leiomyoma. An exam revealed a cervical mass highly suspicious of cervical cancer. If not treated, Sarafina could develop chronic pelvic pain and there is a risk of cancer spreading, poor quality of life due to chronic pain and organ failure. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus, but her family cannot afford the surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $319 to fund Sarafina's surgery. On September 4th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Sarafina will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain. Sarafina says, “I pray that I may be considered for treatment because I am in severe pain and my condition could get worse. I hope to be normal again so that I may get back to farming and taking care of my family.”

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