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Success! Jacob from Venezuela raised $1,167 to fund corrective surgery for his birth condition.

Jacob
100%
  • $1,167 raised, $0 to go
$1,167
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Jacob's treatment was fully funded on December 9, 2021.
November 30, 2021

Jacob is a 3-year-old who lives with his family in Colombia. His parents moved from Venezuela after he was born seeking better opportunities for their family. Jacob has a 6-year-old sister who loves to play with him.

Jacob’s family calls him their rainbow baby as after a miscarriage this little angel came to fill his parents lives with joy. He loves to play with cars and different toys, he shares everything unless it’s a candy he really likes. He enjoys watching tv and singing and his favorite song is baby shark!

On December 20th, our medical partner Clínica Noel will help Jacob undergo a orchidopexy procedure to heal his birth condition. They are raising $1,167 to fund his surgery and care.

Jacob’s mother said: “I just hope that with this surgery everything goes perfectly. I dream that he can have a normal future with a family and no health difficulties.”

Jacob is a 3-year-old who lives with his family in Colombia. His parents moved from Venezuela after he was born seeking better opportunities...

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Jacob's Timeline

  • November 30, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Jacob was submitted by Sofía Gaviria Miranda, Head of Donations at Clínica Noel.

  • November 30, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Jacob's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 9, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Jacob's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 20, 2021
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Jacob was scheduled to receive treatment at Clínica Noel in Colombia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Jacob's treatment update from Clínica Noel.

Funded by 17 donors

Funded by 17 donors

Treatment
Orchidopexy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,167 for Jacob's treatment
Hospital Fees
$666
Medical Staff
$406
Medication
$95
Supplies
$0
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Not seeing or feeling a testicle where it is expected in the scrotum is the main sign of an undescended testicle. Testicles form in the abdomen during fetal development. During the last couple of months of normal fetal development, the testicles gradually descend from the abdomen through a tube-like passageway in the groin (inguinal canal) into the scrotum. With an undescended testicle, that process stops or is delayed.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

In order for testicles to develop and function normally, they need to be slightly cooler than normal body temperature. The scrotum provides this cooler environment. Complications of a testicle not being located where it is supposed to be include: -Testicular cancer: the risk is greater for undescended testicles located in the abdomen than in the groin, and when both testicles are affected. Surgically correcting an undescended testicle will decrease the risk of future testicular cancer. -Fertility problems: Low sperm counts, poor sperm quality and decreased fertility are more likely to occur among men who've had an undescended testicle. This can be due to abnormal development of the testicle, and might get worse if the condition goes untreated for an extended period of time. -Testicular torsion: Testicular torsion is the twisting of the spermatic cord, which contains blood vessels, nerves and the tube that carries semen from the testicle to the penis. This painful condition cuts off blood to the testicle. -Trauma: If a testicle is located in the groin, it might be damaged from pressure against the pubic bone. -Inguinal hernia: If the opening between the abdomen and the inguinal canal is too loose, a portion of the intestines can push into the groin.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In the country, it’s hard to have access to good health insurance coverage, is rare that patients are driven to a specialized institution, and even when they are, families often don’t have enough money to pay for the treatment or to travel to the city where they can access surgery.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

A pediatric surgeon does a detailed review of the patient’s condition and determines the best surgical approach. After surgery, the patient has a follow-up appointment to remove stitches.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Bringing down the testicle may improve its function and prevent it from being damaged. An undescended testicle has a higher risk of testicular cancer. Although bringing the testicle down into the scrotum may not fully remove that risk, it will allow doctors to be able to feel any abnormalities in the testicle on routine physical exams throughout a child’s lifetime. An undescended testicle may also have a hernia associated with it that will need to be fixed during the same surgery to bring the testicle down.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

As in any surgery, there’s a risk of bleeding or infection.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In the country, it’s hard to have access to good health insurance coverage, is rare that patients are driven to a specialized institution, and even when they are, families often don’t have enough money to pay for the treatment.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There’s no alternative.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Da

Da is a 67-year-old man who lives with his wife and son in a village on the border of Thailand. Da cannot work since his vision deteriorated three years ago. Da's wife is a homemaker, and his son works as a day laborer. In his free time, Da likes to listen to gospel songs. Starting three years ago, Da's right pupil gradually turned white. The vision in his right eye also blurred over time. Later on, the vision in his left eye also became blurred. When he went to Mae Sot Hospital, the doctor diagnosed him with cataracts in both his eyes and told him he would need surgery. However, when Da told the doctor the he had experienced seizures in the past, the doctor ordered a CT scan to check if the problem with his vision is being caused by a brain tumor. Currently, Da cannot see anything and can only perceive light. He needs someone to guide him to the toilet and help him take a shower because he cannot see. Doctors want Da to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Da's CT scan and care, scheduled for November 29th. Da says, "If my vision is restored, I will teach my son how to farm the land and grow crops. I will also volunteer at the Church as much as I can."

47% funded

47%funded
$198raised
$216to go
Gideon

Gideon is four years old and the last-born in his family of six children. He is a playful, charming, friendly, and happy boy. Gideon comes from the southern highlands of Tanzania close to Katavi National Park. Gideon has not yet started school, but his father says when he gets to be six years old, he will enroll him. Most children in this region join school starting at the age of six due to the long distance they must walk to school. Parents must wait for their children to grow strong enough to walk to and from school before enrolling them. Gideon’s parents are small-scale farmers of maize, beans, and vegetables and only sell a few of their harvests to get money to buy other basics for their family. Gideon has been diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus, where his legs bow inward so that they touch. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he experiences pain and discomfort. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Gideon. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 4th. Treatment will hopefully restore Gideon's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, including school in the future, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Gideon’s father says “My son walks with a gait and falls down a lot. He also complains of pain after a long day of play.”

71% funded

71%funded
$625raised
$255to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Da

Da is a 67-year-old man who lives with his wife and son in a village on the border of Thailand. Da cannot work since his vision deteriorated three years ago. Da's wife is a homemaker, and his son works as a day laborer. In his free time, Da likes to listen to gospel songs. Starting three years ago, Da's right pupil gradually turned white. The vision in his right eye also blurred over time. Later on, the vision in his left eye also became blurred. When he went to Mae Sot Hospital, the doctor diagnosed him with cataracts in both his eyes and told him he would need surgery. However, when Da told the doctor the he had experienced seizures in the past, the doctor ordered a CT scan to check if the problem with his vision is being caused by a brain tumor. Currently, Da cannot see anything and can only perceive light. He needs someone to guide him to the toilet and help him take a shower because he cannot see. Doctors want Da to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Da's CT scan and care, scheduled for November 29th. Da says, "If my vision is restored, I will teach my son how to farm the land and grow crops. I will also volunteer at the Church as much as I can."

47% funded

47%funded
$198raised
$216to go