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Success! Yunis from Tanzania raised $920 to remove growths on her ear.

Yunis
100%
  • $920 raised, $0 to go
$920
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Yunis's treatment was fully funded on March 11, 2016.

Photo of Yunis post-operation

April 5, 2016

Yunis received successful surgery to remove growths on her ear.

“The keloid on Yunis’ left ear was successfully removed,” her medical team explains. “Yunis is happy that she no longer has to cover her head and her ears. She will continue with injections for a period of time with the hope that there won’t be any recurrent.”

“I am so thankful for the financial support,” Yunis shares. “My ear looks normal and I am comfortable walking without covering my head.”

"The keloid on Yunis' left ear was successfully removed," her medical team explains. "Yunis is happy that she no longer has to cover her hea...

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February 7, 2016

Yunis is a hard working 19-year-old woman from Tanzania, where she lives with her parents and five siblings. “She just completed her secondary education last year and she hopes to get good results and continue with higher level of education. She enjoys playing netball and at home she helps her mother with everyday chores,” shares our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF).

Some years ago, Yunis got her ears pierced. According to AMHF, this led to keloids on both ears. Keloids result from the overgrowth of scar tissue, generally occurring at a site where skin is injured. They are hard growths often larger than the original wound itself.

Yunis has undergone three surgical procedures to treat the keloids. The keloid on her right ear went away after the first procedure, but the left ear keloid continues to persist.

Because of the keloids, Yunis experiences itching on her left ear, and cannot leave the house without a hat. If she does not get treated, the keloid will continue to grow and impact her self-esteem.

AMHF can treat Yunis with mass excision surgery. They tell us that with this surgery, “The keloid will be removed, and that will boost Yunis’ self-confidence.”

Treatment will cost a total of $920, which covers surgical and medical expenses, as well as six days in the hospital and six weeks at a rehabilitation center. Unfortunately, with four of their children in school, Yunis’ parents cannot afford to pay for anymore procedures.

“I am interested in studying environmental law, so I hope I will continue with school,” shares Yunis.

Yunis is a hard working 19-year-old woman from Tanzania, where she lives with her parents and five siblings. “She just completed her seconda...

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Yunis's Timeline

  • February 7, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Yunis was submitted by Esupat Kimerei, Rehab Surgery Project Assistant Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Tanzania.

  • February 08, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Yunis received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 04, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Yunis's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 11, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Yunis's treatment was fully funded.

  • April 05, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Yunis's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 16 donors

Funded by 16 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There are so many different kinds of masses so it is difficult to state what the significance is.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The process depends on the location of the mass and whether it is cancerous or benign.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Rombadi

Rombadi is a 34-year-old man from Uganda. He came to Nyakibale Hospital with inguinal area swelling that has been persistent for over five years. He feels pain and discomfort whenever he walks for a long distance, or does anything strenuous. This has strained his daily work as a bodaboda operator in western Uganda. Rombadi had never been to the hospital before due to financial constraints. Fortunately, he was referred to our partner facility where he was diagnosed with a right inguinal hernia. He requires herniorrhaphy to improve his lifestyle and productivity, and reduce the chances of further complications such as strangulation and intestinal obstruction. Rombadi's work provides him and his family with limited income, making life's requirement hard to meet. His wife works on the farm to provide additional income for their family. He is a father of three and sometimes works on the farm as well especially when business is down. Rombadi is not able to meet the cost of surgery and he appeals for critical support. Fortunately, on May 5th, he will undergo a hernia repair surgery at our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $219 to fund Rombadi's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Rombadi says: “I hope that if all goes on well with my surgery, I will be able to continue with working to provide more to my family.”

11% funded

11%funded
$26raised
$193to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Rombadi

Rombadi is a 34-year-old man from Uganda. He came to Nyakibale Hospital with inguinal area swelling that has been persistent for over five years. He feels pain and discomfort whenever he walks for a long distance, or does anything strenuous. This has strained his daily work as a bodaboda operator in western Uganda. Rombadi had never been to the hospital before due to financial constraints. Fortunately, he was referred to our partner facility where he was diagnosed with a right inguinal hernia. He requires herniorrhaphy to improve his lifestyle and productivity, and reduce the chances of further complications such as strangulation and intestinal obstruction. Rombadi's work provides him and his family with limited income, making life's requirement hard to meet. His wife works on the farm to provide additional income for their family. He is a father of three and sometimes works on the farm as well especially when business is down. Rombadi is not able to meet the cost of surgery and he appeals for critical support. Fortunately, on May 5th, he will undergo a hernia repair surgery at our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $219 to fund Rombadi's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Rombadi says: “I hope that if all goes on well with my surgery, I will be able to continue with working to provide more to my family.”

11% funded

11%funded
$26raised
$193to go