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Success! Dorica from Malawi raised $650 to fund gynecological surgery.

Dorica
100%
  • $650 raised, $0 to go
$650
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Dorica's treatment was fully funded on July 1, 2019.

Photo of Dorica post-operation

April 2, 2019

Dorica underwent gynecological surgery.

Surgery was successful. Dorica is looking forward to going home and doing her work.

She says, “Thank you to Watsi for this assistance and God bless this program and please assist many.”

Surgery was successful. Dorica is looking forward to going home and doing her work. She says, "Thank you to Watsi for this assistance and...

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March 27, 2019

Dorica is a mother of two from Malawi. She lives with her children, two grandchildren, and her husband. She does a lot of cooking at home and likes to rest in her free time.

Since December 2018, Dorica has been experiencing prolonged bleeding. She has been diagnosed with unspecified abnormal vaginal bleeding. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus.

Our medical partner, World Altering Medicine, is requesting $650 to fund Dorica’s surgery. On March 28, she will undergo gynecological surgery at Nkhoma Hospital, our medical partner’s care center. The requested money pays for supplies, medications, and seven nights of hospital stay. She looks forward to getting better after this surgery and hopes to start a business of selling doughnuts when she recovers.

Dorica is a mother of two from Malawi. She lives with her children, two grandchildren, and her husband. She does a lot of cooking at home an...

Read more

Dorica's Timeline

  • March 27, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Dorica was submitted by Angela Quashigah at World Altering Medicine, our medical partner in Malawi.

  • March 28, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Dorica received treatment at Nkhoma Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 29, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Dorica's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 02, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Dorica's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • July 01, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Dorica's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 23 donors

Funded by 23 donors

Treatment
Hysterectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $650 for Dorica's treatment
Hospital Fees
$373
Medical Staff
$12
Medication
$236
Supplies
$0
Travel
$7
Labs
$22
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients requiring hysterectomies at our medical partner's care center generally have one of three conditions: uterine fibroids, cervical cancer, or chronic bleeding. Women with uterine fibroids may experience chronic pelvic pain. Women with cervical cancer are often symptom-free and are only diagnosed upon screening. Finally, women with chronic bleeding experience atypical and excessive vaginal bleeding.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

These three conditions may impact the patient's life in different ways. Women with pelvic pain and bleeding may be unable to work or be active. Women who experience bleeding may feel weak, due to the loss of blood and inaccessibility of blood products in Malawi. Women with cervical cancer are at risk of cancer metastasis.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Cervical cancer is the top killer of women in Malawi, which has the highest rate of this type of cancer in the world. There are several factors that lead to these high rates, including early sexual initiation, high HIV prevalence, and lack of screening and treatment. Although health facilities nationwide are supposed to provide screenings, many do not. Therefore, women are never screened, and the cancer can progress to an untreatable stage. In addition, women with cervical cancer often experience no symptoms and may not go in for a screening. Women with vaginal bleeding may experience stigmatization. In Malawi, menstruation can be a challenge. It is difficult to keep fabric clean, as there is often little access to sanitary products.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

A hysterectomy is a surgical operation to remove all or part of the uterus. Surgeons perform radical hysterectomies on women with cervical cancer. This is an aggressive surgical approach to combat cancer. Women with fibroids or bleeding may receive alternative treatments before a hysterectomy.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

For patients with cervical cancer, a hysterectomy is a lifesaving operation. Without treatment, the cancer will continue to spread and ultimately become untreatable. Chemotherapy has not been proven effective in treating cervical cancer, so a hysterectomy is the best option for women. Women with fibroids or bleeding will be able to return to their daily lives without chronic pain and bleeding.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There are risks associated with any surgical procedure. In this case, there is a risk of damage to the ureters and the tubes that connect the kidney to the bladder, as they are near the reproductive system.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There is one public hospital in Malawi's Central Region that provides hysterectomies. Unfortunately, the wait time can be very, very long. Women may not be treated in time or may stop showing up for scheduled surgeries as they continue to be delayed. Other private facilities provide hysterectomies, but at rates that are unaffordable to our patients.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For patients with cervical cancer, there are no good alternatives. For patients with fibroids, it is possible to remove the fibroid alone. This procedure is often done on young women who are still of childbearing age. Some women with fibroids or bleeding receive hormonal treatment before attempting a hysterectomy. In many cases, less aggressive treatments are tried before the patient receives a hysterectomy.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Cha

Cha is a 20-year-old young man from Burma. He lives with his father, older sister, brother-in-law, and three nieces in Hpapun Township of Karen State. Cha is a student and his oldest niece goes to school while the other two are still too young to attend. His father and brother-in-law are subsistence farmers while his sister is a homemaker. In his spare time, Cha loves to play cane ball and football with his friends. He also likes to help his family with farming during school holidays. Cha goes to the nearest high school to his village, located four to five hours away by motorbike in the village of Day Bu Noh. During the school year he lives in a dormitory and he does not have to pay for school and dormitory fees. On May 6th, Cha was getting ready to move back home for the summer holidays. He borrowed his friend’s motorbike and started the trip back to his village. Not long after he left Day Bu Noh Village, his motorcycle slipped on the uneven dirt road and he fell from the motorcycle. The next thing Cha remembered was waking up at a clinic in Day Bu Noh Village with his friend beside him. When he asked his friend what had happened, his friend told him that some of the villagers had found him unconscious on the side of the road and brought him to the clinic. The medic at the clinic examined Cha and told him that his lower jaw was fractured but they could not treat him at the clinic. The medic gave him injections and oral medications to help control the pain. Cha’s friend, who works for the district’s office in the Day Bu Noh village, told his superiors about Cha’s situation and that Cha did not know how he could receive treatment at another clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand where another friend works. However, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, Thailand had shut its borders to neighboring countries. His friend’s superiors were able to arrange for Cha to be brought to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), accompanied by Cha’s friend. Cha was discharged from the clinic in Day Bu Noh Village on May 15th and started to make their way to MTC. After they crossed over into Thailand on a boat, Chan and his friend arrived at MTC on May 16th. At the clinic, the medic examined Cha before telling him that he will have to go to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for an x-ray. He also received some oral pain medication from the medic and, on May 20th, Cha received an x-ray at MSH. The x-ray showed that Cha had fractured his lower jaw in two locations, the left side and in the middle, as well as that the fracture was now infected. He was told that he will need to receive injections to treat the infection and that he will need surgery to help his jaw heal properly. Currently, Cha’s jaw is swollen and painful. He cannot eat solid food and is only able to eat boiled rice and drink liquid food. One of his teeth hurts and he cannot open his mouth wide. He is not able to speak properly, and his lower jaw is extremely painful, especially on the left side. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Cha will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for May 29th and will cost $1,500. The surgery will help Cha to be free from the pain and he will be able to talk properly again. “I feel sad that I cannot help my family during this summer holiday,” Cha said. In the future, Cha said that he plans to continue his studies next year at Mu Traw Junior College in Day Bu Noh Village. He is also interested in working with his friend at the district office in the branch that looks after the environment, forest, and wild animals.

79% funded

79%funded
$1,186raised
$314to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.