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Success! Sonfong from Cambodia raised $417 to fund corrective surgery.

Sonfong
100%
  • $417 raised, $0 to go
$417
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Sonfong's treatment was fully funded on October 20, 2018.

Photo of Sonfong post-operation

August 10, 2018

Sonfong underwent corrective surgery.

Sonfong’s surgery went well and she’s been working with the physiotherapy team to improve the mobility and function in her hand. Surgery will allow Sonfong to greatly improve her quality of life and allow her to work without pain.

Her mother says, “I am very happy after the operation. I can continue to complete daily work.”

Sonfong's surgery went well and she's been working with the physiotherapy team to improve the mobility and function in her hand. Surgery wil...

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August 1, 2018

Sonfong is a young woman from Cambodia. She has one brother and three sisters. She enjoys spending time with friends.

Sonfong was born with a congenital deformity of her hand. The contractures on her four fingers make it difficult for her to carry things and bend her fingers. She needs to undergo a contracture release surgery to improve her mobility in her hand.

Sonfong is scheduled for corrective surgery at our medical partner’s care center on August 1. Now, she needs help raising $417 to fund this procedure.

She says, “I hope after the operation, my hand is better and I can move my fingers freely.”

Sonfong is a young woman from Cambodia. She has one brother and three sisters. She enjoys spending time with friends. Sonfong was born w...

Read more

Sonfong's Timeline

  • August 1, 2018
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Sonfong was submitted by Lindsay Bownik, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • August 01, 2018
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Sonfong received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 02, 2018
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Sonfong's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • August 10, 2018
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Sonfong's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • October 20, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Sonfong's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 20 donors

Funded by 20 donors

Treatment
Contracture Release Surgery
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $417 for Sonfong's treatment
Hospital Fees
$65
Medical Staff
$304
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Contractures are permanently shortened muscles or joints that occur most commonly in the elbow, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder. As the muscle is unable to stretch, the affected area has considerably limited movement. Other symptoms include pain and inflammation.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The inability to move the affected area impacts mobility and can reduce the patient’s ability to perform daily tasks independently.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Trauma is a major cause of contractures, and road traffic accidents—particularly with motorcycles—are pervasive in Cambodia. In addition, the longer that the contracture goes without treatment, the less chance there is of motion recovery; the lack of many surgical centers in Cambodia means that patients do not often present early for treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Contracture release surgery aims to remove or cut the thickened scar tissue (fascia) and procedures vary depending on the joint affected. There are three main ways of treating a contracture: open fasciotomy, which cuts the fascia by cutting open the overlying skin; needle fasciotomy, which cuts through the fascia using a needle and without opening the skin; and open fasciectomy, which removes the fascia.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Surgical treatment of contracture restores movement to the affected area, allowing patients increased function and reduced pain.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

The surgery carries a small risk of infection and of damage to nearby tendons, blood vessels, and nerves. Postoperative complications include loss of flexion and hematoma.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

While some treatment for contractures can be available locally, certain contractures need surgery to restore motion. Affordable surgical care is not very accessible, and so patients travel as much as twelve hours to reach Children's Surgical Centre for free surgery, arriving by bus, motorbike, or taxi.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Physical therapy, splinting, and other exercises may be able to increase movement if the contracture is only in the muscles; joint contractures and contractures that do not respond to other treatments may require a surgery to restore function of the affected area.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Thi

Thi is a 31-year-old woman who lives with her husband, father-in-law, nephew and daughter in Shwepythar Town in the Yangon Division of Burma. Thi is a homemaker while her husband is an electrician. Thi’s nephew and her daughter are students. In mid-February 2019, Thi developed a fever, a cough, and difficulty breathing. She went to the nearest clinic where she received an injection and oral medication to treat her fever and cough. When she took the medication she felt better, but the next day, she had difficulty breathing, felt tired, had a sharp pain in her chest, and a rapid heartbeat. She then went to a hospital in Yangon, where she received another injection, oral medication, and an x-ray. After the doctor diagnosed her with asthma, she also received a nebulizer for her asthma. Once the doctor checking her had the x-ray results, the doctor told her that her heart is enlarged and referred her to another hospital for further investigation. There she received an echocardiogram (echo) and another x-ray. After her results came in, the doctor told her that her heart valves are not working well and that she might have to replace two of the valves in her heart. She was diagnosed with mitral valve stenosis, mitral valve regurgitation, aortic valve stenosis, and aortic valve regurgitation. The doctor also told her that the surgery would cost 2.5 million kyat (approx. 2,500 USD). Thi could not afford to pay such a large amount and when she told the doctor this, the doctor provided her with oral medication every month. She did not feel better after she took the medication. Last month, Thi’s husband was setting up the electricity in his friend’s house when he met a cardiologist. The doctor had come to look after his friend’s sister, who has a heart condition. Thi’s husband had told his friend about Thi’s heart condition and his friend introduced him to the cardiologist. After he told the doctor about Thi’s condition, the doctor told him to bring her in to his office with her medical records. After they came into his office and doctor reviewed her medical records, he referred her to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Pinlon Hospital to finally receive the treatment she needs. Currently, Thi feels tired, has difficulty breathing and cannot walk long distances. Aside from her symptoms, she is very stressed and upset about her financial situation. In her free time, Thi likes to do housework and bring her daughter to and from school. In the future, when she is fully recovered, she would like to work as a seamstress and save money for her family. Thi said, “I think too much about my condition and worry about the treatment’s cost. So, I cannot sleep at night and I have a small appetite.” Thi’s husband said, “I have to accompany her whenever my wife visits the hospital. My daughter and I have had to stop working and attending school whenever she is sick. I feel bad for my wife because she cries every night since she found out that she needs to receive surgery.” Thi added, “I am very afraid to die and to lose my family as my daughter is still young.”

78% funded

78%funded
$1,179raised
$321to go
Rachel

Rachel is a tailor from Kenya. She is a middle-aged woman from the east of the country. Eight years ago, she noted a lump on her right breast and consulted several hospitals. She had FNA tests run and cancer was ruled out. In 2014, she had a lumpectomy but unfortunately, the lump recurred in 2018. She was biopsied in a different hospital and still did not get a cancer diagnosis. Late in 2019, she opted to come to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kijabe Hospital where she had several tests done, including an ultrasound and CT scan. Doctors diagnosed early-stage cancer. Rachel returned to the hospital in April and surgery is advised. If not operated on, she is at risk of cancer metastasis, which might result in an early death. Rachel is a mother of two children, ages 10 and 8 years old. She lives in a two-roomed rental house paying $34 per month. She sustains her family through her small tailoring venture in their house. Living with a disability, where she had a right femur osteomyelitis in 1982, she is not able to move with ease, and this limits her ability to earn a better living and lifestyle. She separated with her husband, making it hard for her to meet the daily cost of living. She left her two children with a neighbor to come for surgery and appeals for financial help. Without treatment, her cancer may spread to other organs. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been suggested to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $898 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Rachel. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 6th. After treatment, Rachel will hopefully return to a cancer-free life. Rachel says, “Thank you for agreeing to support my surgery. I am grateful and look forward to quick recovery.”

61% funded

61%funded
$552raised
$346to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.