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Success! Ananiya from Ethiopia raised $1,293 to fund surgery for his birth condition so he can live a full, healthy life.

Ananiya
100%
  • $1,293 raised, $0 to go
$1,293
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ananiya's treatment was fully funded on January 25, 2022.

Photo of Ananiya post-operation

January 31, 2022

Ananiya underwent successful corrective surgery for his birth condition so he can live a full, healthy life.

Ananiya’s surgery was a success! He underwent hypospadias repair surgery and will no longer experience uncomfortable symptoms.

Ananiya’s mother shared, “I am so happy about the surgery. Ananiya was always afraid of using the bathroom. Now he is liberated from his shyness and fear. He is psychologically relieved. He even has a difference in his appetite. He eats well now and I am so happy to see all these changes with him. I am thankful for the support and help Watsi did for us.”

Ananiya's surgery was a success! He underwent hypospadias repair surgery and will no longer experience uncomfortable symptoms. Ananiya's ...

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November 2, 2021

Ananiya is a 5-year-old boy from Ethiopia. He loves playing football and playing with toys. Ananiya is the firstborn in a family of two children.

Ananiya’s father passed away five years ago so his uncle helps to take care of them. His mom is worried and concerned about her son’s wellbeing and is seeking financial assistance to help Ananiya get the second-stage surgery that he needs to be healthy.

Ananiya was born with hypospadias, a congenital abnormality that causes urinary dysfunction. Without treatment, he will continue to experience uncomfortable symptoms and will be at risk of infertility.

Fortunately, Ananiya is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on November 16th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,293 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

His mom is feeling a renewed sense of hope for the future. She said, “I hope my child goes to school after the treatment. If it’s God’s will, he may even be a doctor in the future.”

Ananiya is a 5-year-old boy from Ethiopia. He loves playing football and playing with toys. Ananiya is the firstborn in a family of two chil...

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Ananiya's Timeline

  • November 2, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ananiya was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • November 16, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ananiya's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 9, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ananiya received treatment at BethanyKids Myungsung Christian Medical Centre (BKMCM) in Ethiopia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 25, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ananiya's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 31, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Ananiya's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 30 donors

Funded by 30 donors

Treatment
Hypospadias
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,293 for Ananiya's treatment
Hospital Fees
$1,126
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$40
Supplies
$0
Labs
$65
Other
$62
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Hypospadias is a congenital defect in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis. The urethra is the tube that drains urine from the bladder. In males, the opening of the urethra is normally at the end of the penis. Symptoms of hypospadias vary. This condition may cause genital malformation and urinary dysfunction. It can lead to infections, social stigma, and infertility.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If this condition is not repaired, it can lead to urinary dysfunction, genital malformation, infertility, and increased risk of urinary tract infections.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hypospadias is one of the most common birth defects in boys. It is the most frequent congenital urological anomaly, occurring in 1–3 per 1,000 live births.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient is monitored closely and discharged from the hospital after five days. Stitches will be removed during a follow-up appointment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The urethra will be corrected, improving urinary function.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This is a low-risk procedure, and the impact of this surgery lasts a lifetime. If the patient has complicated hypospadias, he may need to undergo further surgery. Follow-up visits with a urologist may also be needed, particularly when patients reach puberty.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Surgery is not required for mild cases. Otherwise, there is no alternative.

Meet another patient you can support

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U Nyan

U Nyan is a 62-year-old man who lives with his wife in Mon State, Burma. He used to work as a tricycle taxi driver as well as a day labourer but since he had stroke around three months ago, he stopped working. His wife also had a stroke and cannot work. They have a daughter who works across the border in Bangkok, and she sends them some money every three or four months. However, the amount that her daughter sends is not enough for U Nyan and his wife for their daily expenses and they shared that, occasionally, their neighbor also gives them food. Recently, U Nyan noticed a small lump on his left elbow, which rapidly became enlarged and painful. Currently, U Nyan is in a lot of pain and cannot sleep. After seeking treatment at various clinics and hospitals, U Nyan was finally referred to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH) where he was diagnosed with an abscess around his left elbow joint and scheduled for surgery on May 9th. When he told the doctor that he could not afford to pay for his surgery, the doctor referred him to our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund for financial assistance accessing surgery. He has already borrowed about $350 so far to help with his diagnosis and treatment, and people in his community have pitched in to support him financially. Our medical partner is helping him raise $760 for his surgery. “After surgery I want to go home and look after my wife. I want to listen to sermons, meditate and do good deeds,” shared U Nyan.

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Gebreegziabher

Gebreegziabher is a brave, young, and fun boy who loves to hangout with his friends. He loves to play chase and other games with his friends and brothers. He has five siblings and shared with us that he loves goats! Gebreegziabher never went to school because of his condition. He is a shepherd and helps to keep the sheep and goats of his parents. Because of his condition, he has endured bullying, but he continues to be brave and his dad shared: “He is so strong despite his sickness. When others pick on him and speak bad things about him and things related to his disease he even gets in to fights.” Gebreegziabher's mom and dad counsel him and comfort him and help him to bring out self-confidence and strength. His dad and his mom are farmers and his mom takes care of all the household chores. Dad said: “Our area is dry. We work hard and farm but the harvest is poor with lack of rain. We purchase food because our harvest is not enough to support the family.” They also raise animals to support themselves. The community survives with the dry land and the scarcity of food by donations from the government and NGOs. But the past two years they couldn’t get the donation since they are in the war zone. For these reasons they can’t afford the medical bill for their son. Gebreegziabher was born with congenital anomaly called bladder extrophy. That is an abnormally where the bladder is open to air. Given the pain and risk of infection, he just ties clothes around the wound. His mom is very much worried and concerned because of his condition. She shared that she has excluded herself from the community for years in taking care of him and raises him and recalls that when growing up, he would sit faraway from others and boys in his age. They keep up hope for better days ahead and are a loving family who support each other the best they can. His Dad said: “He learned to exclude himself from others growing up. We are sad as a family because of his condition. The neighbor insults us, discriminate us and we feel so sad about this. We couldn’t tell what will happen to him. And we bring him to God always.”

69% funded

69%funded
$1,035raised
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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

U Nyan

U Nyan is a 62-year-old man who lives with his wife in Mon State, Burma. He used to work as a tricycle taxi driver as well as a day labourer but since he had stroke around three months ago, he stopped working. His wife also had a stroke and cannot work. They have a daughter who works across the border in Bangkok, and she sends them some money every three or four months. However, the amount that her daughter sends is not enough for U Nyan and his wife for their daily expenses and they shared that, occasionally, their neighbor also gives them food. Recently, U Nyan noticed a small lump on his left elbow, which rapidly became enlarged and painful. Currently, U Nyan is in a lot of pain and cannot sleep. After seeking treatment at various clinics and hospitals, U Nyan was finally referred to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH) where he was diagnosed with an abscess around his left elbow joint and scheduled for surgery on May 9th. When he told the doctor that he could not afford to pay for his surgery, the doctor referred him to our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund for financial assistance accessing surgery. He has already borrowed about $350 so far to help with his diagnosis and treatment, and people in his community have pitched in to support him financially. Our medical partner is helping him raise $760 for his surgery. “After surgery I want to go home and look after my wife. I want to listen to sermons, meditate and do good deeds,” shared U Nyan.

31% funded

31%funded
$238raised
$522to go