African Mission Healthcare

Ethiopia

BethanyKids Myungsung Christian Medical Centre (BKMCM)

Patients at BethanyKids Myungsung Christian Medical Centre (BKMCM)

Abnet, a precious 9-month-old baby girl from Ethiopia, has captured our hearts with her beauty and spirit. She is the only child of her young 20-year-old parents. Her father works alongside his own father as a coffee farmer, while her mother lovingly tends to their home. Despite not having had the opportunity for formal education, they pour their efforts into providing for their family through the limited farming they do, though it yields barely enough to sustain them. From the very beginning, Abnet's parents demonstrated their determination to seek medical care for their daughter, even in the face of financial challenges. Abnet was born with a congenital anorectal malformation, a condition that disrupts bowel function due to a partial or complete blockage of the intestines. In order to alleviate her suffering and restore her health, she must undergo a series of intricate procedures. Their family initially went to a government hospital, where they were referred to another medical facility. Sadly, their hopes were dashed as they were asked to return two years later. Recognizing the worsening state of Abnet's health, they reached out to a local social worker, sharing their child's condition. Fortunately, the social worker was able to introduce them to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). Abnet underwent a thorough evaluation leading to a recommendation for the necessary surgery. Abnet is now scheduled for surgery on August 15th. AMH is requesting $1500 to help fund her procedure. Following her successful recovery, Abnet will be a healthy little girl, able to resume normal activities. Abnet's mother shared, "When we first learned of our daughter's condition, a sense of worry and helplessness engulfed us. The path forward seemed uncertain and daunting. Despite the challenges we faced, we relentlessly pursued treatment for our beloved child. Though previous avenues turned us away, the administrative office introduced us to this lifeline of support. We embraced it with hope, and it has brought us to this moment, filled with gratitude and anticipation."

$945raised
$555to go

Rabira is a 20-month-old toddler from Ethiopia, who loves playing with his toy cars and laughing with his parents. Rabira's mother and father have separated, and his father has taken it upon himself to raise Rabira and his one sibling. Rabira's father, who had to leave school when he was young, is starting to attend night classes, so that he can gain more education, and find work that will provide for his family. Soon after he was born, Rabira's father noticed that Rabira suffered from problems going to the bathroom. He brought Rabira to the nearby health center for evaluation, where it was determined that he had been born with hypospadias. If his condition is left untreated, Rabira would continue to experience urinary dysfunction, and might develop cancer or fertility issues later on. Due to financial constraints, Rabira's parents were unable to access care for him at the local hospital. Fortunately, the family was referred to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, and now Rabira is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on October 24th, at BethanyKids Myungsung Christian Medical Centre. African Mission Healthcare Foundation is requesting $1,293 to cover the total cost of Rabira's procedure and care. Rabira's mother said: “After the surgery, I hope he will be normal and pass urine normally as other children. And if he gets better I want him to go to school and graduate school. Become a person who earns well and supports himself. And when I get old I hope he will be able to support me.”

$1,171raised
$122to go

Kenay is a sweet eleven-month-old baby boy from Ethiopia who loves to play with his mom. He is the fourth child of his parents. Kenay has started weaning and is eating Plumpy Nut, a nutrition supplement donated by the government and organizations to children with malnutrition, as Kenay was underweight. Kenay’s dad is a farmer and has land, but because of the drought, they couldn’t harvest enough, even for the family’s consumption. Initially, Kenay got his emergency colostomy from Sekota Hospital, which was supported by the community. However, he became so sick and underweight that his mother and some family members lost hope in his ability to survive. Fortunately, his mom heard about our medical partner’s care center, BethanyKids, from a social worker, and upon learning that they could get treatment for his condition, their hope increased. Bethany Kids covered the family’s transportation and accommodation to bring Kenay to the hospital, where the medical team first put him on a nutrition program for over four months to treat malnutrition. Now, Kenay’s weight is normal, and he is fit for surgery. Kenay was born with an anorectal malformation, a congenital abnormality that leads to a complete or partial intestinal blockage. He needs to undergo a series of procedures to eliminate bowel dysfunction. The long journey with multiple issues with his colostomy care has significantly impacted the psychological health of his parents, and they are requesting financial assistance with his surgery cost. Kenay is scheduled to undergo surgery to correct his condition on November 22nd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $1,500 to cover Kenay’s procedure and care costs. After his recovery, Kenay will no longer experience bowel dysfunction or be at risk of developing health complications in the future. Kenay’s mom said, “I hope my child will get treatment, and I hope he will heal after the treatment. I hope I will see him growing up and start a decent life.”

$1,145raised
$354to go

Samuel is a toddler from Ethiopia. He is the second child and loves playing with his older brother. He also loves to take milk and Plumpy Nuts, a nutritional treatment donated by the government for malnourishment, as many children in Samuel’s area experience malnutrition. Samuel’s parents separated, and he, along with his siblings, is being cared for by his mother. She works in the community market, which is a community-organized venture that operates one day a week. On the other days, his mother buys and sells bread from bread makers for a profit. Due to the area’s high poverty levels and rocky topography, drought and water shortages limit food production, so many families receive food donations of maize and wheat from the government, which also helps Samuel’s mom support her family. Samuel was born with hypospadias, a congenital abnormality that causes urinary dysfunction. His mom brought him to a local health center, where he was referred to the hospital. Unfortunately, before treatment could begin, war broke out and forced Samuel and his mother to return home without any treatment. Samuel’s mom has been deeply concerned about his health. However, she was filled with hope after meeting with a social worker from our medical partner’s care center and learning that Samuel’s condition is treatable. With that hope, she traveled three days to the care center for Samuel's surgery. Samuel is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on December 12th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $1,293 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Without treatment, he will continue to experience uncomfortable symptoms and will be at risk of infertility. Samuel’s mom said, “I hope I will see my child healed and pass urine just like other children.”

$1,264raised
$29to go

Kila is a sweet 19-month-old boy from Ethiopia. He already loves to play football with his dad and mom. His mom and dad went to school up to grade three and dropped out since the schools were far from their neighbourhood. They now work as casual labourers at a construction site; his mom carries Kila to work and works with him tied on her back. They earn $1.76 per day and live in a rented house. They work hard, but their income is hardly enough to sustain the family and to raise their child. They support each other in the housework too. Dad buys water and carries it on his back for their daily use. They buy charcoal to cook their food. Since birth, Kila has had an inguinal hernia. His parents took him to a health centre, but they were referred to a hospital in another city. A month ago, they heard of an organization around their area that helps families in need who don't have access to surgery because of a lack of funds to support their treatment. They went to the mission organization and communicated with the sisters about the condition of the child and their financial status. The sisters called our local partner's care center Bethany KidsMCM and informed them of Kila's condition. BKMCM arranged accommodation for his family on their treatment stay in Addis Ababa, working in partnership with Missionaries of Charity, and assigned a date and informed the sisters to bring the family on that date. The family is unable to afford Kila's surgery and is requesting financial assistance. This hernia causes him weakness and pain that prevents him from walking. Fortunately, on December 12th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $512 to fund Kila's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live and grow more comfortably and confidently. Kila's dad said, “This is in the hands of God, but I hope with this surgery, the bulge will disappear and he will get normal and free of any complication.”

$45raised
$467to go

Alazar is a sweet boy from Ethiopia. He is the seventh child in his family. Five of the children are girls and two are boys. He loves to sing songs, go to church, try martial arts, and drink juice. His dad is diabetic and his condition causes him to faint often. He has government health insurance and gets treatment in a local government hospital. Because of his condition, Alazar's dad cannot work. His mom makes traditional bread and sells it on the street to feed her children. She makes her bread by firewood and this makes it hard for her to always have the smoke of the wood making the bread. She is the only one who works for income in their family, but her older children help with housework. They bring water from the spring carrying it on their back. She proudly sends all her children to school. Alazar underwent an earlier colostomy, in which the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for closure. In Alazar's case, his colostomy requires closure in order to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,009 to cover the cost of a colostomy closure for Alazar. The surgery is scheduled to take place on January 9th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Alazar's mom said: “After he gets the treatment and heals I will praise my Lord. I will tell everyone who knows me about the hand of God. I did ask God ‘to heal my baby. You gave me this child; don’t take it away from me. I always cry and pray.’ I hope God has heard my prayer leading me to you. I will go to my church and testify what God did to all community in the church.”

$431raised
$578to go

Babi is a cute toddler from Ethiopia. He is an only child and loves to play with toy cars; he pushes the toy making the sound 'uuuuuvvvv', saying it's a car. His father, who has a 5th-grade education, used to work in the horticulture industry as a laborer, but he lost his wife a year back to tuberculosis and has been trying to balance everything on his own. After his mom's death, Babi had no one to take care of him besides his dad, so his dad decided to leave his job to take care of his child and try to get him the necessary treatment. Babi experienced a bowel obstruction, and he got three surgeries at Negele Arsi General Hospital, but he still had complications with his bowel. There is a small window for corrective surgery, but colostomy closure is preferred since the opening is too small. Babi's father has suffered with the whole process and feels he is highly affected psychologically as Babi cannot make a stool in a normal way. Earlier, Babi underwent a colostomy, in which the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for closure. In Babi's case, his colostomy requires closure to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,009 to cover Babi's colostomy closure cost. Once completed, he can grow up more comfortably and confidently. Babi's dad said, "After he gets the treatment and heals, I hope he will go to school and lead a good life in the future."

$1,009raised
Fully funded