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Success! Khin from Burma raised $1,500 to fund a leg amputation to treat her cancer.

Khin
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Khin's treatment was fully funded on September 4, 2022.
September 1, 2022

Khin is a 40-year-old woman who enjoys growing flowers and vegetables in her free time. She lives with her husband, son, and four daughters in Burma. She is a homemaker and takes care of her youngest daughter while her husband sells snacks in front of their home. Her son works in a teashop and her three oldest daughters currently attend primary school. Khin shares that she hopes to run a fruit shop to further support her family once she recovers.

When Khin was 22 years old, she developed an ulcer on her right heel that made it difficult to put weight on her foot and walk. Fortunately, she received multiple skin grafts and the ulcer eventually healed.

However, the ulcer returned in 2019, and despite receiving the same treatment as before, she was only able to walk with a limp after surgery. Last April, Khin began experiencing severe pain on her right heel once again. She eventually sought medical attention and was told by her doctor that she has cancer in her right lower leg. Her doctor advised that she have her leg amputated below her knee, but due to financial constraints, she could not proceed with the surgery and returned home.

After three months, the pain continued to worsen and Khin visited our medical partner’s care center, Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), to request painkillers. After examining her leg, the doctor at MCLH told her that she would have to have her lower right leg amputated to prevent the spread of the cancer. Just as before, Khin refused the amputation. The doctor then referred her to the oncology department of Mawlamyine General Hospital and recommended that she receive a biopsy to confirm her diagnosis and need for surgery.

The biopsy revealed that she has skin cancer. Khin decided that she wanted to proceed with the amputation despite being unable to fund the cost. The doctor admitted her that same day and fortunately referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for financial assistance accessing treatment. On September 1st, surgeons at MCLH’s care center will perform a leg amputation. Now, BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund Khin’s life-changing procedure.

Khin shares, “I just came to MCLH for painkillers, and I did not know that the doctor would help me through donors. When I heard that I could have surgery with the help of donors, I felt so happy and my stress was relieved. My family also encouraged me to have the amputation so I can live a longer life with my children. I would like to say thank you to the donors for giving me a chance to live longer with my children.”

Khin is a 40-year-old woman who enjoys growing flowers and vegetables in her free time. She lives with her husband, son, and four daughters ...

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Khin's Timeline

  • September 1, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Khin was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • September 1, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Khin was scheduled to receive treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 1, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Khin's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 4, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Khin's treatment was fully funded.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Khin's treatment update from Burma Children Medical Fund.

Funded by 18 donors

Funded by 18 donors

Treatment
Amputation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,397 for Khin's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,897 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,558
Medical Staff
$108
Medication
$2
Supplies
$158
Travel
$16
Labs
$20
Radiology
$5
Other
$530
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Diagnosis involves broken bones, pain, and swelling.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Broken bones lead to decreased mobility. Patients are unable to do their normal daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most people in remote areas try to fix the broken legs/arms by themselves. People go to spiritual healers or traditional massagers for healing. Sometimes the broken bone heals, but not in the correct position.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After a series of x-rays, the doctor then decides on surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Healing takes time, especially for bones. When the bones have completely healed, patients will be able to get back to their normal activities without pain and/or swelling.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks include allergic response, infection, malignancy (very rare), osteoporosis, and migration.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Since most of our medical partner's patients come from remote areas of Burma, the treatment is not easily accessible, as it is only available in big cities like Rangoon. Patients cannot afford the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

None. If the broken bones are not fixed, patients will have to spend their lives in pain. If the swelling turns out to be malignant then it will spread faster, costing the patient’s life.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Marivel

Marivel is a hardworking and loving daughter from the Philippines. She is a 2nd-year college student. While studying, she tried to look for jobs to support her family. Unfortunately, to date she has been unable to pass the medical (health) requirements. The only breadwinner in the family is her father who works as a pedicab driver. Her father's income is often not enough to bring food to the table. In 2018, Marivel began to experience troubling symptoms, including a mass on her neck that is growing in size, and episodes of difficulty breathing. Due to the inadequate family resources, she did not seek treatment. By the time she finally had a chance to be checked by a doctor, her condition had worsened. She was diagnosed with Nodular Non-Toxic Goiter, a thyroid gland enlargement with no disturbance in the thyroid function. She needs surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse. Fortunately, our medical partner, World Surgical Foundation Philippines (WSFP), is helping Marivel receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a thyroidectomy on December 10th at Our Lady of Peace Hospital. Surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. A portion of the cost of her treatment is being supported by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation, and WSFP is raising the remaining $890 to cover the cost of Marivel's procedure and care. Marivel shared, "I'd like to thank Watsi and World Surgical Foundation Philippines. You're not just giving me surgery, but also a chance to support my family. After my treatment, I'd be able to find a decent job and provide for our needs."

48% funded

48%funded
$429raised
$461to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.