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Success! Swabra from Tanzania raised $935 to fund clubfoot surgery.

Swabra
100%
  • $935 raised, $0 to go
$935
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Swabra's treatment was fully funded on December 1, 2020.

Photo of Swabra post-operation

October 29, 2020

Swabra is undergoing clubfoot treatment.

Our medical partner shared that Swabra’s manipulation and casting, which is helping correct both of her feet, is going well. She is going through the casting process to reposition her feet. Through this treatment, Swabra will be able to get get back on her feet once more and walk without the fear of pain or discomfort. She will be able to lead a normal life without limitation due to disability or be discriminated because of being disabled.

Swabra’s mother says, “I am really grateful for the help and support that you have given to my daughter because there was no means of us to afford her treatment cost. We had already asked for help from friends and relatives and we felt like a burden to them but you gave us another chance. God bless you very much. ”

Our medical partner shared that Swabra's manipulation and casting, which is helping correct both of her feet, is going well. She is going th...

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August 20, 2020

Swabra is a baby from Tanzania. She is the youngest child in a family of four children. Swabra has grown into a happy, playful, and very friendly girl. Swabra’s mother is a stay home mother and her father is a driver in public transport.

Swabra has clubfoot of both feet. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes.

Fortunately, Swabra traveled to visit our medical partner’s care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on August 21st. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Swabra’s clubfoot repair. After treatment, she will be able to walk easily.

Swabra’s mother shared, “It has been a joy to see our daughter begin to walk and play, like her sibling. But she is having a hard time walking and we are worried. Please help us.”

Swabra is a baby from Tanzania. She is the youngest child in a family of four children. Swabra has grown into a happy, playful, and very fri...

Read more

Swabra's Timeline

  • August 20, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Swabra was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Tanzania.

  • August 21, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Swabra received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 21, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Swabra's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 29, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Swabra's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 1, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Swabra's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 21 donors

Funded by 21 donors

Treatment
Clubfoot
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $935 for Swabra's treatment
Hospital Fees
$693
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$8
Supplies
$175
Labs
$14
Other
$45
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The foot is turned inward, often severely, at the ankle, and the arch of the foot is very high. Patients experience discomfort, and the affected leg may be shorter and smaller than the other.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

These children have a difficult time walking and running. Years of trying to walk on a clubfoot will cause wounds and other skeletal problems, such as arthritis. Patients will have difficulty fitting in shoes and participating in normal play, school, and daily activities. Many Africans make their livings through manual labor, which can be difficult with an untreated clubfoot.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Incidence is 1/1,000 live births, or about 1,600 cases in Tanzania annually. This is roughly similar to rates in Western countries, though many cases may be missed. There is no known reason for its occurrence in this region.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Patients will undergo a series of small operations, casting, and manipulations during their course of treatment. Patients will stay in the Plaster House, a rehabilitation center for children in Tanzania, for as long as their recovery takes.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joint will become aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Clubfoot is very treatable. The surgery is minor and not risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. Most patients live in remote, rural areas and are identified through mobile outreach. The pediatric surgical program at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre was started to meet the large burden of pediatric disability in the region.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If not treated, the condition will persist and will result in disability.

Meet another patient you can support

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Rosemary

Rosemary is a 55-year-old woman, who is a very cheerful, talkative, and full of humour. Rosemary has a small kiosk where she sells beauty products. In recent years, she has been supporting her sick mother until her mother passed away last year. Early February 2020, Rosemary started experiencing some pain in her abdominal area. The pain became severe, and persisted for some time before she went to a hospital for a checkup. During the examination, she was found to have helicobacter pylori and gallbladder problems, and was also suspected to have gallbladder stones. Rosemary was given medication, which seemed to work at first but her gall bladder problems eventually worsened. Afterwards, Rosemary was referred to another facility in Nairobi for further treatment, but after going through scans and treatment, she did not notice any change in her condition. Eventually, she came to our Medical Partner Kijabe Hospital in February 2021. After the examination, the doctor recommended that she undergo a curative laparatomy to better treat her condition. However, Rosemary cannot afford the cost of her care. While supporting her mother, she found herself in a lot of debt that she is still trying to clear. Rosemary does not have National Health Insurance Fund coverage, and her condition needs urgent treatment. Rosemary has no extra source of income and is appealing for financial help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On March 31st, Rosemary will undergo a laparoscopic cholecystectomy to treat her persistent pain. Once recovered, she will hopefully be free of pain and her quality of life will significantly improve. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $616 to fund this procedure. Rosemary shared, “The financial situation I'm in makes it hard for me to raise enough funds for my surgery yet it is worsening as time goes by. Any financial help offered will be highly appreciated."

41% funded

41%funded
$256raised
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Ra Sa

Ra Sa is a 67-year-old woman who lives with her nephew in Mae La Refugee Camp in Thailand. Ra Sa is a homemaker and her nephew is a student. Ra Sa’s daughter, who also lives in the camp with her husband, supports Ra Sa with food and visits several times a week. Ra Sa’s daughter works as a domestic worker in the camp, and her son-in-law works as a porter unloading supplies from delivery trucks, but the support they are able to provide for Ra Sa does not always cover her expenses. In her free time, Ra Sa likes to teach children at the local mosque. However, since a hernia appeared last year, she has not been able to teach in the same way. Once she has recovered, she wants to live happily with her nephew and to continue teaching. Since the 7th of March 2020, Ra Sa has had an umbilical hernia. She experiences a lot of pain in her lower abdomen and has three lumps that are increasing in size every day. She can no longer sit for more than 10 minutes before she is in pain, feeling more comfortable when she lies down. Sometimes she cannot breathe well and is having other troubling symptoms. Fortunately, on March 5th, she will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Ra Sa's hernia repair surgery, which will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably again. Ra Sa said, “I prayed every day that I would get a donor to cover the cost of my surgery and I feel like my prayers have been answered. I am so happy! I would like to say thank you so much to all of the donors. I will never forget what you have done for me and I hope that you will continue to help more patients in the future.”

76% funded

76%funded
$1,143raised
$357to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.