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Success! Harun from Kenya raised $1,224 to fund surgery to treat bilateral clubfoot.

Harun
100%
  • $1,224 raised, $0 to go
$1,224
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Harun's treatment was fully funded on January 8, 2018.

Photo of Harun post-operation

September 22, 2017

Harun underwent surgery to treat bilateral clubfoot.

Harun received successful clubfoot correction surgery and he will be able move around with no pain and discomfort walking.

He says, “I expect to continue with my studies and help my family in future. God bless you for solving a problem which has been disturbing me both physically and mentally.”

Harun received successful clubfoot correction surgery and he will be able move around with no pain and discomfort walking. He says, "I ex...

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August 17, 2017

17-year-old Harun is a secondary school student who lives in central Kenya. He is the oldest of three children in his family. His father is a farmer, and his mother stays at home. The family had been living in a rental house until they built a two-room house with the help of well-wishers and their extended family.

Harun has bilateral clubfoot, a condition in which both of his feet are twisted out of position due to short tendons in his feet and ankles. As a result, Harun cannot walk for long distances. His condition was neglected because his parents feared huge medical bills that they could not afford.

Treatment for clubfoot is surgery to release the tendons in the involved foot and ankle. Doctors then move the foot into the proper position and place it in a cast for up to two months. After the casts are removed, some patients wear a brace for a year or more to maintain the proper position of the foot. Harun’s surgeons plan to start treatment on his left foot on August 21 and treat his right foot at a later date.

“We cannot afford the bill as stipulated, and we request your help,” shares Harun’s father. Watsi’s medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, requests $1,224 to pay for Harun’s surgery, six-day hospital stay, lab tests, medicine, and surgical supplies.

Hardworking and focused both at school and at home, Harun aspires to become a doctor when he grows up. Let’s help fund his surgery!

17-year-old Harun is a secondary school student who lives in central Kenya. He is the oldest of three children in his family. His father is ...

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Harun's Timeline

  • August 17, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Harun was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • August 21, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Harun received treatment at AIC Cure International Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 18, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Harun's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 22, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Harun's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • January 8, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Harun's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 24 donors

Funded by 24 donors

Treatment
Club Foot Correction
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,224 for Harun's treatment
Hospital Fees
$273
Medical Staff
$313
Medication
$179
Supplies
$395
Labs
$37
Radiology
$27
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The foot is turned inward, often severely, at the ankle, and the arch of the foot is very high. Patients experience discomfort, and the affected leg may be shorter and smaller than the other.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

These children have a difficult time walking and running. Years of trying to walk on a clubfoot will cause wounds and other skeletal problems, such as arthritis. Patients will have difficulty fitting in shoes and participating in normal play, school, and daily activities. Many Africans make their livings through manual labor, which can be difficult with an untreated clubfoot.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Incidence is 1/1,000 live births in Kenya. This is roughly similar to rates in Western countries, though many cases may be missed. There is no known reason for its occurrence in this region.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Patients will undergo a series of small operations, casting, and manipulations during their course of treatment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joint will become aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Clubfoot is very treatable. The surgery is minor and not risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. AIC Cure International Hospital is one of the few pediatric orthopedic hospitals devoted to serving the physically disabled children of Kenya. Most parents bring their children from remote areas to seek treatment.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If not treated, the condition will persist and will result in disability.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Roy

Roy is 1-year-old baby boy and the only child in his family. After he was born, his father stopped supporting Roy and his mother. Roy and his mother moved to his grandmother's home, and his grandmother sells farm products to sustain them. His mother is not able to work because Roy needs her attention, but sometimes she does some casual jobs when she can bring Roy along. The family does not have insurance and is asking for financial help. Two weeks after Roy was born, his mother noticed that his stomach was swollen and he was not passing stool. She rushed him to a nearby hospital for examination and Roy was urgently referred to another facility where he underwent a colostomy. His mother was informed that Roy was born with a congenital abnormality that leads to a complete or partial intestinal blockage. He needs to undergo a series of procedures to eliminate bowel dysfunction. The facility Roy was at stopped offering surgeries and so he was referred to our medical partner's care center Bethany Kids Hospital for surgery. Roy is scheduled to undergo surgery to correct his condition on September 16th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Roy's procedure and care. After his recovery, Roy will no longer experience bowel dysfunction or be at risk of developing health complications in the future. Roy’s mother says, “I would like my child to grow up healthy as other kids so that I can be independent and provide for him.”

67% funded

67%funded
$1,012raised
$488to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.