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Kamaganju is a small-scale farmer from Uganda who needs $228 to fund a hysterectomy.

Kamaganju
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  • $20 raised, $208 to go
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$208
to go
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July 20, 2020

Kamaganju is small-scale farmer from Uganda. She is a mother to 8 children. Her husband is also a small-scale farmer and together they work to pay for their children’s school fees.

For the last 10 years, Kamaganju has been experiencing lower abdominal pain. She has been diagnosed with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $228 to fund Kamaganju’s surgery. On July 21st, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner’s care center. Once recovered, Kamaganju will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and her quality of life will improve.

Kamaganju shared, “I am in severe pain, I am helpless. My husband and I have lost hope because we cannot afford the surgery charges. After the surgery, I believe I will be able to work harder through farming to be able to sustain myself and my entire family.”

Kamaganju is small-scale farmer from Uganda. She is a mother to 8 children. Her husband is also a small-scale farmer and together they work ...

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Kamaganju's Timeline

  • July 20, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Kamaganju was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • July 21, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Kamaganju's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 22, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Kamaganju received treatment at Rushoroza Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 07, 2020
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Kamaganju's treatment update from African Mission Healthcare.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Kamaganju is currently raising funds for her treatment.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
Total Abdominal Hysterectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $228 for Kamaganju's treatment
Hospital Fees
$135
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$24
Supplies
$38
Labs
$20
Other
$11
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms vary depending on the condition that requires the total abdominal hysterectomy. If the cause is cervical, uterine, or ovarian cancer, there may not be symptoms, especially if the cancer is early-stage. In more advanced cases of cervical and uterine cancers, abnormal bleeding, unusual discharge, and pelvic or abdominal pain can occur. Symptoms of ovarian cancer may include trouble eating, trouble feeling full, bloating, and urinary abnormality. If the cause is fibroids, symptoms may include heavy bleeding, pain in the pelvis or lower back, and swelling or enlargement of the abdomen.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Fibroids can grow large, cause abdominal pain and swelling, and lead to recurring bleeding and anemia. Cancer can cause pain and lead to death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted infection called human papillomavirus (HPV), which can often occur alongside a HIV infection. As a result, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among African women in areas of high HIV prevalence. Cervical cancer is also more prevalent in Africa than in the United States due to the lack of early-detection screening programs. The other conditions treated by a total abdominal hysterectomy are not necessarily more common in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient first reports for laboratory testing. The following day, the patient undergoes surgery. After the operation, the patient stays in the hospital ward for three to four days, during which she is continually monitored. The surgery is considered successful if the wound heals without infection, bleeding, or fever, and if the patient no longer experiences urinary dysfunction.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of uterine fibroids or early-stage cancer, a total abdominal hysterectomy is curative.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If performed early enough, this surgery is low-risk and curative, with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

This surgery is available, but many patients cannot afford it. Many women are screened for cervical cancer with a low-cost alternative to a pap smear. This is common in HIV treatment programs. If necessary, the woman is referred for surgery, which she often cannot afford.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If cervical cancer is caught early enough, some minor procedures can solve the problem. Women with fibroids who still wish to have children may opt to undergo a surgery only to remove the fibroids, which is called a myomectomy.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Monica

Our local Watsi rep shared that Monica strains to hear and requests to pull down my mask so that she can read my lips and follow the conversation. She is 33 years old and has had hearing loss for 8 years now. This condition has given her torment, pain, and driven her to near depression. She is unable to hear properly and occasionally gets irritating buzzing noises. She requires bilateral hearing aids that will help her to regain her sense of hearing and boost her self-esteem. In August 2012, it was all blissful and love was in the air for Monica, she shared. She had just settled down into marriage with the love of her life. She remembers vividly on the 23rd day of that month, Monica was doing her daily chores when she felt a billow of wind blowing through her ears. This marked the beginning of her hearing problem and an end to a normal life. At first, Monica thought it was just wind but she started getting nervous when her ears began producing endless buzzing noises that caused her discomfort. She visited a health center in her home town in Mwea where she was reviewed and treated. However, due to the severity of the condition, doctors referred her to a facility with ENT specialists. She has since visited several facilities but the condition keeps recurring. At one point, Monica felt that medical interventions were not working and opted to abandon seeking health care and try prayers. In 2016, she even tried to assembled elders from both sides of the family to help break what they believed was a curse. Nothing worked. Seeing their frustration, a friend of the family referred them to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kijabe Hospital earlier this year. They were unable to visit the facility because they didn’t have money. But in the first week of September, a friend volunteered to give her fare and a little money for a consultation. She was reviewed by the ENT team at the hospital and hearing aids are recommended. Monica is married to a supportive husband who has always stood by her, even at moments when her marriage was going through turmoil. Together, they have three children aged between 4-9 years. They currently live in Ruai in a single room rental house that costs $20 a month. She is a manual laborer who earns daily wages depending on the availability of work. She told us that her income is unpredictable and at times, she goes for days without earning. Her husband works in building sites. On a good day, he makes an average of $4. They depend on this income to pay rent, upkeep for their kids, and medical trips for Monica. They are requesting assistance to make this treatment possible. Monica says, “This condition has frustrated me to a point of threatening my marriage. I know the aids will help to restore my hearing. The buzzing noises are so irritating and uncomfortable. At some point, I felt so low and disappointed that I wanted doctors to shut down my hearing so that I cannot hear the noises.”

80% funded

80%funded
$786raised
$191to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.