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jamie brim

MONTHLY DONORi'm just as lost as you

United States

jamie's Story

jamie joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Six years ago, jamie joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. jamie's most recent donation traveled 8,600 miles to support Gyi, an agricultural labourer from Thailand, to fund a CT scan on his abdomen.

Impact

jamie has funded healthcare for 145 patients in 15 countries.

All patients funded by jamie

Shoh

Shoh is a 47-year-old man who lives with his wife, two sons, daughter-in-law and two daughters in Nu Poe Refugee Camp in Thailand. In the camp, Shoh and his oldest son are teachers who teach about the Quran for other refugees. They each earn 1,200 baht (approx. 40 USD) per month. His wife is often sick, and his eldest daughter has to look after her at home. His daughter-in-law is a homemaker while his youngest daughter and son are students. Shoh’s household receives 1,110 baht (approx. 37 USD) every month on a cash card to purchase rations in the camp. Their monthly household income is just enough to cover their daily expenses as they also receive free basic health care and education in the camp. Since February 2020, Shoh has had umbilical hearnia. Currently, Shoh’s abdomen pain is not severe but his hernia is still increasing in size. He feels uncomfortable when he walks because of his swollen abdomen. He cannot sleep well and is increasingly worried about his diagnosis. The pain in his abdomen increases when he feels cold, especially at night. Fortunately, on March 9th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Shoh's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 9th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Shoh said, “I do not want to stop being a teacher. I love teaching the Quran to young children. Also, if I do not teach, I do not earn an income and my family does not have enough income to cover our household expenses.”

77% funded

77%funded
$1,160raised
$340to go
Marline

Marline is a 7-year-old boy from Kenya. He is a cheerful boy and a Grade 2 student at Jayden Academy. Marline wants to be an engineer when he grows up. Marline's mother says that he loves to dismantle and assemble electronics in the house, and is well on his way to his career dreams. Additionally, Marline has a condition called spina bifida. Earlier in April 2020, Marline was playing with his friends when his mother noticed a small pimple-like wound on his right foot. It was small at first, but slowly started to grow bigger in size. His mother rushed him to a nearby health centre in their hometown, where he has been undergoing dressing in the facility but they have not seen much improvement. Since Marline has been coming to Kijabe Hospital for his spina bifida clinic, he opted to seek review in the hospital and get this wound checked. He was reviewed a week ago by the plastic and pediatric surgical teams, who recommended that he undergoes debridement, excision of calcaneal ulcer, and flap cover surgery to clean and heal his infected wound. Currently, Marline is in pain and at risk for further infection. If left unattended, the wound may result in severe infection and possible amputation. Unfortunately, these procedures are costly for Marline's family. His mother is a single mother raising two kids on her own. Their family lives in a bedsitter house in Ruai, at the outskirts of Nairobi. Marline's father left the family and his responsibility. Marline's mother is the sole breadwinner of the family and she has a small grocery kiosk. The total profit from the venture is very small, and her close relatives are not able to assist with financial support. Their family appeals for help. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Marline receive treatment. On January 6th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to help heal the wound and prevent possible complications. Now, Marline's family needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Marline's mother says, “This wound is worsening by the day. If left unattended, doctors say that he might lose his leg. This would be hurting all of us. Kindly help us as we really don’t have a way out."

100% funded

$1,185raised
Fully funded
Purity

Purity is a 57-year-old woman from Kenya. As she enters our local Watsi rep's office, Purity strains to sit and cannot hide her pains. She looks uneasy and can’t stop asking when she will be going to the operating theatre. She developed a deep spine infection (surgical site infection) after lumbar surgery that necessitates urgent debridement and removal of hardware. Her current condition is serious and the orthopaedic team has requested an urgent procedure or she risks paralysis. Purity is a mother of 3, all of whom are now adults. Her youngest son is a student at a local university and still depends on her. Her older son is a casual laborer working with Purity’s husband at construction sites locally referred to as mjengo. Her other son is a police officer and has been the one helping Purity to cover her previous medical bills. Her son took out a loan but it was barely enough to cover her earlier treatment. She is also hoping for support from the National Health Insurance coverage, but her application is pending. She is requesting emergency assistance. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Purity receive treatment. On November 4th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to finally help heal her wound, reduce her pain, and enable her to ambulate with ease. Now, Purity needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Purity shared, “I couldn’t sleep one more night at home, the pains are unbearable. I have no source of finances to cover for the surgery that will help me get better. I risk paralysis if this procedure is not performed.”

100% funded

$1,185raised
Fully funded
Bernice

Bernice is an 8-month-old baby from Tanzania. She is a beautiful and cheerful baby, and the last born in a family of two children. Bernice’s mother shared that she is currently having a hard time raising her children because of misunderstandings with her husband. Bernice was born with bilateral clubfoot, something the father was not happy about. The father now does not treat the rest of the family well and he does not support them in any way. Bernice's mother and her children have moved into their living room where they sleep and do everything since the father locks the bedroom and does not want any of them going in there. This has left Bernice’s mother feeling very depressed and struggling to support her children. Bernice has clubfoot of both feet. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. Bernice’s mother works at a local school as a teacher and uses her salary to support her children. She is not able to afford Bernice’s treatment cost. Fortunately, Bernice traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on October 9th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Bernice's clubfoot repair. After treatment, Bernice will be able to walk easily. Bernice’s mother says, “I am going through a very difficult time and seeing my daughter being disabled is hurting me even more. Please help my daughter so that she can have a normal walking style when she grows up.”

100% funded

$935raised
Fully funded