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Success! Mugabirwe from Uganda raised $228 to fund a hysterectomy.

Mugabirwe
100%
  • $228 raised, $0 to go
$228
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Mugabirwe's treatment was fully funded on September 9, 2020.

Photo of Mugabirwe post-operation

September 9, 2020

Mugabirwe underwent a hysterectomy.

Mugabirwe underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy due to multiple intra-uterine fibroids. Our medical partner shared that her surgery was successful. She was discharged home with minimal complaints.

She believes she will be able to practice farming with ease since she will no longer be in pain. Having been relieved of the burden, Mugabirwe feels she will live a better life through hard work especially now that she is on her own; no husband and no children to support her. She will be able to sustain and develop herself. She plans to transform her farming into extensive farming if she manages to raise enough capital for investment.

Mugabirwe says, “I thank WATSI and Rushoroza hospital for the great support they have rendered towards my surgery. I have a big story to tell my friends and relatives. I will resume farming as soon as I recover completely.”

Mugabirwe underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy due to multiple intra-uterine fibroids. Our medical partner shared that her surgery was s...

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August 4, 2020

Mugabirwe is a small-scale farmer from Uganda. She lost her husband 10 years ago. She now lives with her parents where she practices farming.

For the last 7 years, Mugabirwe has been experiencing lower abdominal pains and severe headaches. She has been diagnosed with multiple intrauterine fibroids. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $228 to fund Mugabirwe’s surgery. On August 5th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner’s care center. Once recovered, Mugabirwe will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and her quality of life will improve.

Mugabirwe shared, “I hope to be myself again and be able to carry on my usual farming duties, help me God.”

Mugabirwe is a small-scale farmer from Uganda. She lost her husband 10 years ago. She now lives with her parents where she practices farming...

Read more

Mugabirwe's Timeline

  • August 4, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Mugabirwe was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • August 05, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Mugabirwe received treatment at Rushoroza Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 06, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Mugabirwe's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 09, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Mugabirwe's treatment was fully funded.

  • September 09, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Mugabirwe's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
Total Abdominal Hysterectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $228 for Mugabirwe's treatment
Hospital Fees
$135
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$24
Supplies
$38
Labs
$20
Other
$11
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms vary depending on the condition that requires the total abdominal hysterectomy. If the cause is cervical, uterine, or ovarian cancer, there may not be symptoms, especially if the cancer is early-stage. In more advanced cases of cervical and uterine cancers, abnormal bleeding, unusual discharge, and pelvic or abdominal pain can occur. Symptoms of ovarian cancer may include trouble eating, trouble feeling full, bloating, and urinary abnormality. If the cause is fibroids, symptoms may include heavy bleeding, pain in the pelvis or lower back, and swelling or enlargement of the abdomen.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Fibroids can grow large, cause abdominal pain and swelling, and lead to recurring bleeding and anemia. Cancer can cause pain and lead to death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted infection called human papillomavirus (HPV), which can often occur alongside a HIV infection. As a result, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among African women in areas of high HIV prevalence. Cervical cancer is also more prevalent in Africa than in the United States due to the lack of early-detection screening programs. The other conditions treated by a total abdominal hysterectomy are not necessarily more common in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient first reports for laboratory testing. The following day, the patient undergoes surgery. After the operation, the patient stays in the hospital ward for three to four days, during which she is continually monitored. The surgery is considered successful if the wound heals without infection, bleeding, or fever, and if the patient no longer experiences urinary dysfunction.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of uterine fibroids or early-stage cancer, a total abdominal hysterectomy is curative.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If performed early enough, this surgery is low-risk and curative, with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

This surgery is available, but many patients cannot afford it. Many women are screened for cervical cancer with a low-cost alternative to a pap smear. This is common in HIV treatment programs. If necessary, the woman is referred for surgery, which she often cannot afford.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If cervical cancer is caught early enough, some minor procedures can solve the problem. Women with fibroids who still wish to have children may opt to undergo a surgery only to remove the fibroids, which is called a myomectomy.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Min

Min lives with his wife, son, and daughter in a village in Tak Province, Thailand. He moved from Burma to Thailand nine months ago in search of better job opportunities. His daughter is still too young to go to school and his wife and son work as day laborers on a farm, each earning 150 baht (approx. 5 USD) per day. Min had to stop working with his wife and son three months ago because of his condition. Their monthly household income of 3,000 baht (approx. 100 USD) is not enough to cover their daily expenses. Sometimes, they have to borrow money from their relatives to meet their basic needs. Four years ago, Min used to work as a construction worker in Bangkok. One day, he started to experience pain in the left side of his abdomen. He went to a clinic twice and was diagnosed with a kidney stone in his left kidney after receiving an ultrasound. The doctor told him that he would need to undergo laser treatment at a hospital to break up the stone. The next day, Min went to a hospital in Bangkok. He received another ultrasound and underwent laser treatment which he did not have to pay for because he had health insurance at that time. When he returned for his follow-up appointment, he underwent another round of laser treatment, followed by more oral medications to take home. Min was not able to return to the hospital because his father passed away before his next appointment and he had to go back to Burma for the funeral. Before he had a chance to return to Bangkok, his mother also passed away. After spending money on the two funerals, Min did not have enough money to return to Bangkok. He moved back in with his wife and children and started working as a day laborer on a farm with his wife in their village. In May 2019, Min started experiencing pain again in his left lower abdomen. He would also pass small stones about twice a month while urinating. He went to a clinic where he received oral medication as well as an ultrasound. The doctor told him that he has a stone in his left kidney as well as small stones in his urethra. Min went back to the same clinic several times for his follow-up appointments, where he received oral medication each time for his abdominal pain. By September 2019, he was feeling much better and was no longer in pain. He was also no longer passing stones when urinating. Min then stopped going back to the clinic and stopped taking medication. Later in December 2019, Min and his family moved to their current home in Thailand and in May 2020, the pain in Min’s lower abdomen returned. He has pain when urinating and has started to pass small stones again about every two weeks. He went to a local hospital in the beginning of May with his wife, and he received an ultrasound. The ultrasound showed that he now has stones in both of his kidneys in addition to a bladder stone. The doctor referred him to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for treatment, but his family was not able to afford the estimated cost so he returned home. At home, Min told his friend about his condition and his lack of funds to pay for it. His friend told him to seek help at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) and with Watsi's Medical Parter Burma Children Medical Fund. Surgery is now scheduled for August 14th. Min shared, “I had to sell my phone to pay for my treatment [the ultrasounds and oral medications] and my transportation when I sought treatment. For the past few days, we don’t have enough rice and we also don’t have any money to buy more food. So we have to eat rice porridge. I feel so sad for my family.”

81% funded

81%funded
$1,216raised
$284to go
Gideon

Gideon is 6-year-old playful boy. Five days ago, Gideon came to the hospital with a complaint of pain in his right hand, which looked like an obvious fracture due to the deformed and swollen appearance of his arm. He was unable to lift his hand. Gideon sustained the fracture while he was playing with his friends in school. Accompanied by his mother, they walked over 16 miles to get to our hospital to see a doctor and get treated. After the doctor's assessment, Gideon was admitted for skin traction to limit movement and reduce his pain and swelling. Now he has been scheduled for Open Reduction and External Fixation (OREF) surgery on Friday, March 20th. Gideon is the second born in a family of three children. He was born and raised in a small village called Kipkaner where most of the inhabitants work on farms or perform other low-income jobs. His parents did not attend school, so they don’t speak Swahili nor English. The family lives in a small mud hut with grass as a roof. His family gets sustenance from their small farm and consists mostly of millet, sorghum and seasonal fruits like mangos. Gideon likes to spend his days looking after her grandmother's goats. He feels that his grandmother will find it hard to take care of her goats when he is sick. Gideon is in severe pain. He has a hard time sleeping. The family is requesting for financial support for their child to undergo surgery. Gideon’s father says, “I want my son to get back to his normal life. It is paining to see him lay in bed without help.”

78% funded

78%funded
$602raised
$161to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.