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Ryan from Kenya raised $646 to fund corrective surgery for his birth condition.

Ryan
100%
  • $646 raised, $0 to go
$646
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ryan's treatment was fully funded on December 21, 2021.

Photo of Ryan post-operation

January 6, 2022

Ryan underwent surgery and is back home.

Ryan underwent surgery with our medical partner to evaluate for a viable testis via laparoscopic review and an orchidopexy if present. During surgery the surgeon identified that he did not have a via testis so completed his laparoscopy procedure and determined it was not possible to have an orchidopexy. Ryan’s now home and recovering from the procedure.

Ryan’s mother shared: “We were very hopeful about this surgery but the results were not what we thought. With the assurance of the doctor, we are happy that all will be well and we are grateful for the support.”

Ryan underwent surgery with our medical partner to evaluate for a viable testis via laparoscopic review and an orchidopexy if present. Durin...

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October 12, 2021

Ryan is a very active and jovial 5-year-old boy. He’s the only child in his family. His mother works at a local dry cleaner and his father is a matatu driver in their area. Ryan’s family lives in a small rented house in a town within Nairobi, Kenya. His parents’ income is very limited and they are not able to afford the second surgery he needs, as they are also paying off his first surgery that was unsuccessful in fully treating his birth condition.

Ryan was diagnosed with a condition called cryptorchidism. If left untreated, Ryan has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future.

Ryan will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on October 14th. AMHF is requesting $646 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

Ryan’s mother says, “It has been a tough time for us after we realized Ryan’s first surgery was not successful, but we still trusted in God.”

Ryan is a very active and jovial 5-year-old boy. He's the only child in his family. His mother works at a local dry cleaner and his father i...

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Ryan's Timeline

  • October 12, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ryan was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • October 14, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ryan received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH) in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 15, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ryan's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 21, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ryan's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 6, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    We received an update on Ryan. Read the update.

Funded by 14 donors

Funded by 14 donors

Treatment
Orchidopexy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $646 for Ryan's treatment
Hospital Fees
$480
Medical Staff
$10
Medication
$30
Supplies
$90
Labs
$5
Other
$31
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

One of the testicles either appears to be missing or cannot be felt in the scrotum.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Left untreated, this condition can lead to infertility. The higher temperature inside the body can affect sperm production. Men with both testicles affected are more likely to experience fertility-related issues than men with only one affected testicle. This condition can also cause inguinal hernia, in which the intestine protrudes through a weakened area in the abdominal wall. Only surgery can correct this condition, which can otherwise result in intestinal damage or death. Finally, this condition is a risk factor for testicular cancer. If surgery is performed early, this risk is limited.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Undescended testis is the most common birth anomaly in boys. This condition is present in about 1-4.5% of newborns, with a higher incidence in premature babies (30-45%). Unilateral undescended testis is four times more likely than bilateral. Data on this condition is scarce in Kenya, so the true prevalence of acquired undescended testicles is still unknown.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for an average of three days. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment will reduce the risk of infertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is very treatable, and the procedure is low-risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

An alternative to surgery is to use synthetic hormones that encourage the testicle to move into the scrotum. Hormone therapy is only recommended if the child’s testicle(s) are close to the scrotum. However, hormone therapy is not commonly available in Kenya.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Him

Him is a 40-year-old woman who used to work in the market near her home. She is married to a rice farmer and has two sons and one daughter. Her sons are 15 and 12 years old, her daughter is 6 years old. Him enjoys cooking for her family, walking her daughter to and from school, and watching Khmer movies. She was a clothes seller at the market, but stopped after her injury. Last August, Him was in a traffic accident and fractured the bone in her right upper arm. She went to a government hospital for surgery to repair the bone. She left soon after the operation because they couldn't afford the cost to stay, even though her fracture had not yet healed well. Now she has an open wound, feels poorly, and cannot use her arm. A neighbor suggested Him visit Children's Surgical Centre for further treatment. She and her family traveled two hours to the hospital, where surgeons diagnosed a Volkmann contracture, which occurs when there is a lack of blood flow to the forearm. There is increased pressure due to swelling, a condition called compartment syndrome. Surgeons have determined they are not able to save her arm and plan to do an above-the-elbow amputation. The total cost of his procedure is $446, which covers medications, supplies, and inpatient care. The procedure is scheduled for March 10th and Him needs help to pay for this procedure. Him shared, "I hope after surgery I won't have pain or infection anymore. This treatment will help me in the future to work to support my family."

17% funded

17%funded
$79raised
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Maria

Maria is a 70-year-old farmer. She shared that she lost her husband in 1999 and is the mother of six children who she has worked hard to raise well. She has three daughters and three sons, all married and small-scale farmers. Maria was not able to attend school when she was young because she was a refugee from Congo. Her family was always on the move, so she never had the opportunity to attend school. She's earned a living from farming and grows food crops like sorghum, maize, and rice. She has limited land, but when she has a small surplus, she is able to sell the crops to generate income for her family. Maria is a religious, jolly, and happy person and is proud to serve as a leader of the Holy Mary community in her village. She shared that praying the rosary is her passion. Two years back, Maria started feeling her uterus drop. It wasn’t painful, which never made her seek medical treatment, but recently, the pain became worse, accompanied by backaches, abdominal pain, and other symptoms. She first went to Kambuga hospital, where she was examined, diagnosed, and recommended for surgical treatment. However, she never managed to undergo her surgery due to limited finances. After sharing how she feels with a friend, she learned of our medical partner's surgical support program at Nyakibale Hospital, and this gave her a breath of hope that she could be supported. She traveled there and after examination, she was diagnosed with uterine prolapse. The doctors have recommended a total hysterectomy treatment to heal her condition. However, her income is too limited to enable her to afford the cost of her surgery and she appeals for support. Maria says, "I believe that the Lord will again do for me as he has always been for me. I hope to get much better once operated and continue with farming to sustain my family. "

23% funded

23%funded
$56raised
$187to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Him

Him is a 40-year-old woman who used to work in the market near her home. She is married to a rice farmer and has two sons and one daughter. Her sons are 15 and 12 years old, her daughter is 6 years old. Him enjoys cooking for her family, walking her daughter to and from school, and watching Khmer movies. She was a clothes seller at the market, but stopped after her injury. Last August, Him was in a traffic accident and fractured the bone in her right upper arm. She went to a government hospital for surgery to repair the bone. She left soon after the operation because they couldn't afford the cost to stay, even though her fracture had not yet healed well. Now she has an open wound, feels poorly, and cannot use her arm. A neighbor suggested Him visit Children's Surgical Centre for further treatment. She and her family traveled two hours to the hospital, where surgeons diagnosed a Volkmann contracture, which occurs when there is a lack of blood flow to the forearm. There is increased pressure due to swelling, a condition called compartment syndrome. Surgeons have determined they are not able to save her arm and plan to do an above-the-elbow amputation. The total cost of his procedure is $446, which covers medications, supplies, and inpatient care. The procedure is scheduled for March 10th and Him needs help to pay for this procedure. Him shared, "I hope after surgery I won't have pain or infection anymore. This treatment will help me in the future to work to support my family."

17% funded

17%funded
$79raised
$367to go