Ramesh's Story

Ramesh joined Watsi on February 5th, 2015. Nine years ago, Ramesh joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Ramesh's most recent donation traveled 8,300 miles to support Hla Moe, a 30-year-old man from Burma, to fund kidney surgery.

Impact

Ramesh has funded healthcare for 103 patients in 12 countries.

Patients funded by Ramesh

John is a quiet 11-year-old boy from Kenya. John's story is a journey of compassion and the unwavering support of a dedicated well-wisher. His origin is drawn back in Tanzania, where he faced the disturbing reality of being disowned by his real parents due to his disability on his feet. John was left helpless in the unfamiliar surroundings of central Kenya. For the past seven years his guardian has stood by his side, offering not just a shelter but also a sense of belonging. John’s chapter started to change when a team of AIC Cure International doctors visited his neighborhood for a mobile clinic. He was reviewed and scheduled for surgery and underwent a successful surgery on his left foot and his left foot has healed well. John still has clubfoot of right foot. He is currently in the hospital to undergo right foot treatment, which involves serial casting to adjust the position of his foot to achieve the desired correction. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. Surgeons from our medical partner's care center, AIC Cure International Hospital are scheduled to now perform clubfoot repair surgery on February 19th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,286 to fund John's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk easily. Once he heals, John aspires to go back to school and study and one day achieve his dream of becoming a doctor in future. John told us: “I am looking forward to seeing my foot corrected, walking properly, playing football with my friends and continuing with my studies like other children, and achieving my dream of becoming a doctor in future to also impact lives of children born like me."

$486raised
$800to go

Alazar is a sweet boy from Ethiopia. He is the seventh child in his family. Five of the children are girls and two are boys. He loves to sing songs, go to church, try martial arts, and drink juice. His dad is diabetic and his condition causes him to faint often. He has government health insurance and gets treatment in a local government hospital. Because of his condition, Alazar's dad cannot work. His mom makes traditional bread and sells it on the street to feed her children. She makes her bread by firewood and this makes it hard for her to always have the smoke of the wood making the bread. She is the only one who works for income in their family, but her older children help with housework. They bring water from the spring carrying it on their back. She proudly sends all her children to school. Alazar underwent an earlier colostomy, in which the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for closure. In Alazar's case, his colostomy requires closure in order to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,009 to cover the cost of a colostomy closure for Alazar. The surgery is scheduled to take place on January 9th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Alazar's mom said: “After he gets the treatment and heals I will praise my Lord. I will tell everyone who knows me about the hand of God. I did ask God ‘to heal my baby. You gave me this child; don’t take it away from me. I always cry and pray.’ I hope God has heard my prayer leading me to you. I will go to my church and testify what God did to all community in the church.”

$431raised
$578to go

Kalar is a 53-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her mother and daughter in Htantabin Township, Yangon Division village. Kalar used to sell vegetables, but she stopped in October because her condition was worsening. Kalar's mother is a homemaker. Kalar's daughter left school three years ago because she couldn't afford the school fees. Currently, she is working in a restaurant. Their monthly income is not enough for their daily expenses, and they have to borrow money from their friends to make ends meet and pay for basic medical costs. In 2017, Kalar's upper abdomen was in pain, and she went to a hospital in the village. There, she received an ultrasound, and the doctor told her that she had a small stone in her gall bladder and she would need medication to reduce the stone. She felt much better after taking the medication, and she didn't go to any clinic or hospital after that. In October 2023, Kalar's symptoms returned, and she visited the hospital in the town where she received the ultrasound. At the hospital, the doctor confirmed that Kalar had a large gallstone and would require surgery to heal. She could not afford to pay for the surgery, so she received medication and returned home. Her condition gradually got worse. Kalar has not been eating or sleeping well and is in pain. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Kalar will be able to undergo gallbladder removal surgery on November 18th. BCMF requests $1,487 to cover Kalar's procedure and care costs. Kalar said, "I was upset because I couldn't work and support my mother and daughter. Now, I am so happy! I want to say thank you to all of the donors for supporting my surgery."

$1,487raised
Fully funded

Biruk is an adorable toddler from Ethiopia who loves to play and walk. He has recently started walking, and it seems like he only wants to explore the world on his feet. He also enjoys playing with other children, always eager to share their toys or try to claim some for himself. Being the only child in the family, he receives a lot of love and attention from his parents. Biruk's dad holds a university degree in agriculture, and his mom graduated from college with a diploma in ICT. Despite her educational background, she couldn't find a job in that field and now assists her husband with their farming endeavors. They were fortunate to receive a small farming land from their parents, and they work diligently to make a living from it. In addition to farming for their needs, they also purchase crops to sell, aiming to generate additional income and improve their economic situation. Although their income is modest, they work hard to support their family's daily necessities and strive to save up to purchase more land. Biruk was born with Hypospadias, a congenital abnormality which affects the male urinary opening. When he was just five months old, his parents took Biruk to a hospital for medical attention. The doctor mentioned that they would need a referral when the child reaches six months of age. Unfortunately, when they returned to the hospital later, they were informed that the doctor was unavailable, leaving them uncertain and frustrated. Without treatment, Biruk will continue to experience uncomfortable symptoms and will be at risk of infertility. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help. Biruk is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery at AMH's care center on August 8th. AMH is requesting $1,293 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Biruk's mum said, “I will work hard to bring my child to a successful future once he receives the treatment and is healed. I hope he will be successful and lead a good life in the future.”

$1,293raised
Fully funded

Noah is a 3-year-old boy from Tanzania. He is the second-to-last child in a family of 4 children. His family resides in a remote village known in Simanjiro, Tanzania. Noah’s mother is a homemaker and also assists her husband with agricultural activities, given that farming is their primary source of sustenance and income. Noah takes pleasure in helping others and enjoys solving puzzles alongside his friends. When Noah was merely eight months old, he was crawling around the house and ventured into the kitchen alone, just as his mother was occupied with washing chores. Inadvertently, he encountered a pan which slipped from the stove, causing hot water to spill onto the left side of his body, resulting in severe burns on his left armpit and elbow. Noah’s parents swiftly transported him to the nearest medical facility for urgent treatment. After receiving initial first aid, he was subsequently discharged with instructions for proper wound care. Despite these efforts, his wounds took two months to fully heal. Even after healing, noticeable damage to the skin remained on his left axilla (armpit) and elbow, which subsequently restricted the range of motion in his left arm, leading to his discomfort while crawling. The gravity of the situation became apparent to Noah’s parents, who were initially unaware of the necessity for further medical intervention to enhance their son’s quality of life. Noah was diagnosed with burn scar contractures affecting his left axilla and elbow. The contractures tighten the skin around the arm such that he is unable to use his hand without discomfort. Recognizing the significance of their son’s well-being, Noah’s parents humbly seek assistance to ensure he receives the requisite treatment to enhance his quality of life. Fortunately, our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH) is helping Noah receive treatment. On August 14th, surgeons will perform a burn contracture release surgery to enable him to use his hand with ease and improve his quality of life. AMH needs help raising $874 to fund the procedure. Noah’s father says, “We are excited for his treatment as this condition has made him less interactive with his peers, and we are hopeful for a positive outcome from the treatment."

$874raised
Fully funded

Israeli is a six-month-old infant from Tanzania. His father works in the mines in Mererani, while his mother, Mary, is a homemaker responsible for caring for the children. Maintaining a decent standard of living has been challenging due to the family’s size, and they rely on only two meals per day. Since he was born, Israeli has faced issues with his right foot. His foot is twisted right and downwards. Although he is not at the walking stage in his development now, his foot will make it difficult to walk when he does reach that stage. For the past four months, Mary has traveled from one care center to another seeking out treatment for Israeli but was unable to find help until she heard about our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). Mary traveled over 300 kilometers (about 186 miles) from her village to Arusha, Tanzania to visit AMH's care center. Doctors at AMH's care center diagnosed Israeli with clubfoot. To rectify the angle of his foot, Doctors will manipulate and stretch the tissues around the foot, then apply a cast to hold the corrected position. Following this, Israeli will undergo tenotomy surgery, where surgeons will length his Achilles tendon. Surgeons at AMH's care center will perform these procedures on June 9th. Now, AMH is requesting $935 to fund Israeli's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk easily once he reaches a walking stage. Israeli's mother says, "I wish my son gets better like his older sibling and grows up to have a good life ahead."

$935raised
Fully funded