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Tamara Heimburge

MONTHLY DONOR

Tamara's Story

Tamara joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Four years ago, Tamara became the 2274th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 3,691 more people have become monthly donors! Tamara's most recent donation supported Angel, a funny and jovial eight-year-old from Kenya, to fund surgery that will enable him to walk.

Impact

Tamara has funded healthcare for 54 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Tamara

Ian

We met with eleven-year-old Ian in the hospital ward as he was admitted for a skin traction after he fell from a tree and broke his left hand. His mother sat beside him helplessly while she watched her only son in pain. It took me time for his mother to talk as she was feeling very disturbed and stressed because of her son's condition. She was trying to help him sit up but he couldn’t because of his fractured hand. Ian was brought to the hospital accompanied by his parents. They walked for hours to get the nearest health facility where he was referred to our hospital for surgical review. On arrival, he had an x-ray done which showed that Ian had fractured his left supracondylar. Ian is the third born child in a family of five. He is the eldest son of Christine and Isaac. They are a humble family who is struggling financially and often lack food for their children. Ian's father is a farmer and his mother is a housewife. They live in a two-roomed mud house in upcountry of Kenya. Ian's father, who is a maize farmer says that his farming is not doing well due to poor rains in the area and he has not been getting good yields in recent years. Medical examination shows that Ian needs urgent surgical intervention for his hand, but his family is unable to raise money for their son’s surgery apart from $30 that they collected from friends and family. His family is requesting our prayers and financial support for Ian’s treatment enable him use his hand. Christine, Ian’s mother says, “It is painful to see my son cry in pain. I hope he will receive treatment soon. All I want is to see him happy.”

62% funded

62%funded
$477raised
$286to go
Htay

Htay is a 54-year-old single woman from Burma. She lives with her sister, three nephews and a niece in Mudon Township, Mon State, Burma. Her nephew and her sister work on a rubber farm while her two other nephews go to school. Her oldest nephew also works in a phone shop. Htay is a homemaker and she does not have income. She lives and eats with her nephews and niece. Htay was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of her mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. When Htay was 30 years old, she started to feel tired, and experienced shortness of breath and difficulty breathing at night. She went to the Yangon General Hospital for treatment. At the hospital, she was diagnosed with mitral valve stenosis and she underwent a procedure called a balloon valvotomy to widen the too narrow valve in her heart. She was fine after her treatment. Four years later, she started to experience shortness of breath, difficulty breathing and could no longer do household chores. However, she did not go to the hospital as she could not afford to pay for further treatment. On the 5th of July 2019, her niece’s husband suggested she seek treatment at Pinlon Hospital, where he had also received surgery in the past. She followed her niece’s husband’s advice and went to Pinlon Hospital. At the hospital she received another screening and the doctor told her she needs to replace one of the valves in her heart. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Htay. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 19th and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Htay said, “After I went to Yangon Hospital several times and the doctor said that I had to have surgery as soon as possible, I felt so sad, but I tried to keep up my courage to stay strong. I secretly sold three acres of my farmland which my parents gave me. [However, I did not receive surgery] because if I would have died after surgery, my sister would have had difficulty paying for my funeral, so I was waiting and praying to meet with donors for a long time. Now, I feel less stressed since I talked to Burma Children Medical Fund staff. Thank you everyone for helping me!”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Siphilina

Siphilina is a 68-year-old talkative grandmother. On 25th of October, 2019, Siphilina fell, sustaining severe left femoral neck fracture. She was taken to the nearest health facility but could not get treatment due to the severity of the condition. She spent some days at home as she was unable to afford medical care. She was in great pain, could not walk and had difficulties sitting or lying in bed. Fortunately, Siphilina went to Kapsowar hospital whereupon diagnosis, she had an ORIF surgery recommended. The surgery will relieve her of the pain, reduce the chances of ambulation problems and further closed fracture complications. Siphilina, a humble millet farmer lives with her daughter and three grandchildren in the village. She lost her husband years ago. Her only source of income is from subsistence farming which has very low-income yields. This limits her ability to raise the required hospital fee for the surgery. Siphilina appeals for help to be able to meet the cost of surgery.  Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On October 30th, Siphilina will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will reduce the pain, fix the fracture reducing chances of further complications on her left leg. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $968 to fund this procedure. Siphilina says, “I want to be able to walk sit and even feed by myself like other people.”

100% funded

$968raised
Fully funded