Alexander's Story

Alexander joined Watsi on November 26th, 2014. Nine years ago, Alexander joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Alexander's most recent donation traveled 5,700 miles to support Chanthorn, a 21-year-old farmer from Cambodia, to fund spinal surgery.

Impact

Alexander has funded healthcare for 91 patients in 14 countries.

Patients funded by Alexander

Abdul is is charming, energetic, and friendly boy from Tanzania. He is four years old and the youngest member of a family comprising of four children, residing in Katundi village, Kigoma Region. Enrolling Abdul in school has posed challenges for his parents due to his difficulty in walking. Abdul was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus. His legs curve inwards, significantly impacting his mobility. His school, situated 4 km from home, compounds the issue, making the daily walk difficult. The family faces financial hardships, relying on small-scale agriculture for sustenance without additional sources of income. They make ends meet primarily because of the relatively low cost of living in their village. Sponsorship from the church supports most of Abdul’s siblings’ education. Despite his physical condition, Abdul remains enthusiastic about life. He engages in playful activities, running around and enjoying time with his friends. The family became aware of Kafika House Care Centre through an outreach program, and Nomad Tours played a significant role in facilitating Abdul’s transportation to the facility. After examination, it was concluded that he would require surgical intervention to correct his deformity. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery and treatment for Abdul at their care center Kafika House. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 16th. Treatment will hopefully restore Abdul's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Abdul’s mother says: “I hope my son’s leg will be straight and he will be able to walk comfortably.”

$880raised
Fully funded

Hapyness is a charming 9-month-old girl, born to hardworking farmers in the remote village of Igot, in the Ulanga district of Tanzania. Her family's daily life revolves around the cultivation of maize and millet, which not only sustains their meals, but also provides a modest income for the family’s necessities. Unfortunately, her father, who is advancing in age, cannot work extended hours, so her mother toils diligently on the farm, to ensure they yield bountiful harvests. Hapyness was born with a clubfoot, a condition in which the foot is abnormally twisted, making it difficult for her to crawl and eventuall to walk. At the time of her birth, the nurse in attendance recommended immediate medical attention. However, locating such specialized care in their isolated village proved to be impossible. After months of searching, Hapyness' father crossed paths with a young boy who had had a clubfoot which had been successfully treated, and he was able to provide Hapyness' father with the information he had been seeking. As a result of this meeting, Hapyness' parents brought her to the Plaster House, where her treatment will begin on October 6th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Hapyness' clubfoot repair. After treatment, she will be able to crawl and to walk comfortably as she grows. Hapyness’s mother says: “I am glad there is a chance for my daughter to get treatment. I hope she doesn't have to live with this disability for the rest of her life.”

$935raised
Fully funded

John is a 2-month-old baby from Tanzania. He resides in a modest home with his parents and two siblings. His mother is a devoted stay-at-home mother, while his father works as a carpenter. His father’s income is enough to cover the family’s basic needs. After John's birth, the doctors realized he was born with a congenital condition and advised his mother to seek specialized care. His right foot was twisted inward and downward. They started him on casting at the hospital for three weeks, hoping it might help him heal. However, it became apparent that his condition was more complex and would require surgical intervention as the only viable option to give John a chance at a more mobile and fulfilling life. However, the financial burden proved to be overwhelming for John’s family. Living on a modest income, they could not afford the surgical treatment cost. They had to make a hard decision to stop their son’s treatment. Sometime after discontinuing their son’s treatment, John’s mother learned about our medical partner the Plaster House and the services it provides. Fueled by love and hope for her son, she sought assistance from the center. John underwent a comprehensive wellness assessment; however, the family cannot raise money for his treatment and is appealing for financial assistance. John has clubfoot on his right foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. The Plaster House team will begin clubfoot treatment on September 19. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $935 to fund John's clubfoot repair. After treatment and as he grows he will be able to walk comfortably, wear shoes, enjoy playtime with his peers, and reassure his parents that their son is free from disability. John’s mother says: “I hope my son’s treatment will be smooth and he will turn out okay after his treatment.”

$935raised
Fully funded

23-year-old Josephine and her two siblings live with their mother in Kenya and participate in small-scale farming for home consumption. Josephine has no source of income but is hoping to pursue a course in hairdressing. On April 16th, 2022, while planting corn on their farm, Josephine slipped and plunged into a hole she hadn't seen. She sustained a fracture in her right leg and surgery was performed to stabilize the bone and help the fracture heal. Two months after the surgery, Josephine started noticing pus accumulating in the affected area. She returned to the hospital and was treated, but her condition did not improve. In October 2022, doctors noted that the hardware that had been placed in Josephine's leg to stabilize the bone had actually caused an infection. Despite the removal of the hardware, the infection has persisted. Josephine has a large mid-diaphyseal sequestrum. This means that her femur bone is infected. As a result, she is unable to use her right leg to walk. If left untreated, the infection can spread, and potentially result in an amputation. With the assistance of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, Josephine has been scheduled for a Right Femur Sequestrectomy and Exfix to clear the infection and strengthen the bone, allowing it to heal completely. The surgery, which will take place at AIC Kijabe Hospital on April 17th, will enable Josephine to walk easily again so that she can farm and pursue the course in hairdressing. She and her family need your help to raise the $1,500 to fund her treatment. Josephine says, “I want to go to college and do a course in hairdressing. I am unable to pursue this dream since I have a broken bone that needs to be attended to.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded