James AllenMONTHLY DONOR
James' Story

James joined Watsi on September 28th, 2015. Four years ago, James joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. James' most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Gabriel, a 12 year old boy from Tanzania, to fund leg surgery so he can go to school.

Impact

James has funded healthcare for 61 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by James

Angel is 10-month-old baby girl. She lives in a small rental house in Nairobi, Kenya with her parents and older sibling. Angel’s parents do not currently have stable jobs. Her mother used to sell fruits, however had to stop to take care of Angel. Her father, now the sole wage earner of the house, is a tailor but does not earn much. The earnings they receive are just enough to take care of the family. As a result, they can not raise the money that is needed to cater for Angel’s hospital bill. Angel has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. Over the December holidays, Angel and her family visited her grandparents, however during this time she became persistently unwell, which caused her parents' concern to grow. They took her to a facility nearby and along the way her grandmother noticed that her head looked bigger than normal, and her eyes were not as they used to be. Upon arrival, the doctor immediately referred them to another specialist. facility in Nairobi. She was then examined and booked for surgery in April of this year. After returning home, the parents continued to watch as Angel grew weaker day by day. A family friend heard about their child’s condition and referred them to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Hospital. On arrival, she received another examination and was promptly scheduled for a shunt insertion surgery. If not treated, Angel will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $720 to cover the cost of Angel's surgery to treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on February 9th, during which surgeons will drain the excess fluid from her brain. This will relieve the pressure inside her head, and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Angel will have the chance to develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Angel’s father says, “This is a condition that we have never heard of before and didn’t know how to go about getting her care. It is very difficult for a parent to see their child in a situation when they do not have finances to help them.”

$720raised
Fully funded

Monicah a hardworking mother of six. Some of her children have finished school while the others are still studying. Monicah's husband, who was the sole breadwinner of the family, was the assistant chief of the area where they are living, but he passed away a few years ago. Monicah shared that upon her husband’s death, she had to get out of her comfort zone and figure out how to provide for their family. After a long time of doing some casual jobs where she could find them, she got a job as a house help but her earnings are limited. Her family does not have a National Health Insurance coverage and is not able to raise the funds needed for Monicah’s surgery. In July 2021, Monicah went to the hospital for her regular clinic appointment and heard that there was a free cervical cancer screening centre there. Monicah has been experiencing lower abdominal pain so after the clinic, she went to be screened. The results were not as she expected. She has been diagnosed with cervical cancer. The doctor has scheduled her for total abdominal hysterectomy surgery but she is afraid the cost is too much for her to meet. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1260 to fund Monicah's surgery. On January 7th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Monicah will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and hopes to live a life cancer-free. Monicah says, "I did not know that I was sick and since then things have happened so fast. I do not know where the money for my surgery will come from but I know that God will make a way.”

$1,260raised
Fully funded

Salomy is a sixty-two-year-old farmer, a mother of 6 (3 boys and 3 girls), and a wife to a loving husband who had a stroke in 2010. Salomy is a very responsible woman and able to take care of the family including her grandchildren through small-scale farming and business. She sells Irish potatoes the she grows on her family farm in Malawi. She owns a big farm and used to make lots of produce; unfortunately the productivity has now gone down as she is unable to work or supervise the farm work due to her current health condition. Eight years ago Salomy developed a swelling in the neck and she assumed it would go away with time. When she noticed that the swelling was still growing, she started visiting the nearest health center. At that point then she was able to continue working in her field and do her business as usual. For the past 2 years however, the condition has destabilized her normal life since she cannot breathe properly and she cannot walk a long distance to buy the products she needs to sell. This has been a very challenging part as a breadwinner to sustain the home and provide the required support to her sick husband. Salomy visited a number of hospitals but had no chance to meet a surgeon to discuss how her problem will be solved. A month ago she was talking to a friend who partially knows about Partners in Hope and she asked a relative from Lilongwe to enquire for her. She learned that she could be able to meet the surgeon and traveled all the way from Mzimba to Lilongwe where she is now temporarily lodging at her distant relative’s home just to have her surgery. She met the surgeon who made a diagnosis of goiter and recommended surgical removal of the goiter in a procedure called thyroidectomy. Goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland on the front and sides of the neck. Thyroidectomy, on the other hand, is the surgical removal of the enlarged thyroid gland as treatment for the goiter. Salomy is unable to meet the whole cost of surgery due to her multiple responsibilities and she has no medical insurance. She believes the surgical operation will give her peace of mind, the symptoms will go away and she will continue providing her best support to her family and especially her husband who is unable to do most of the things by himself. The surgery will restore Salomy’s multiple abilities as the main pillar of the family. Salomy says, "My main fear is the responsibilities that I carry as a farmer, a breadwinner, a mother, a wife, and a grandmother. If I go unassisted all these important roles will suffer. When successful, the surgery will not only benefit me but mostly the whole family that I care for."

$1,015raised
Fully funded

Ar is a 28-year-old man who lives with his wife, three sons, and two daughters in a refugee camp. Originally from Burma, his family fled to Thailand 20 years ago due to civil war. His children attend school, except for his youngest daughter, who is not yet old enough. His wife is a homemaker and Ar works as a day laborer when work is available. Ar's family shared that, in addition to his day laborer pay, they receive a monthly cash card from The Border Consortium to purchase food in the refugee camp. Overall, the family's total monthly income is just enough to cover their basic needs. On September 2nd, Ar climbed a tamarind tree to pick tamarinds fruit. When the branch he was standing on suddenly broke, he fell and landed on his right arm and experienced pain in his back. He visited the camp hospital that day, and the medic initially determined that his arm was not broken. Due to recent positive COVID-19 cases in the refugee camp, Ar could not be immediately referred to the local hospital for further testing and was kept for observation at the camp hospital. When the pain in Ar's back and arm did not subside the next day, the medic referred Ar to the local hospital. After receiving a negative COVID-19 test, Ar was finally able to visit the hospital on September 6th, where he received an X-ray for his arm and a blood test for a second COVID-19 test. The X-ray revealed that his upper right arm is broken. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Ar will undergo surgery on September 8th to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure will enable Ar to continue working in the future. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Ar shared, "I am scared to receive surgery. But I was told that I will not be able to work using my right arm if I do not receive surgery, so I gave my consent to the doctor. I hope that I will be able to work again after I receive treatment."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Yin is a 62-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, son in-law, and granddaughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. She is a homemaker, and she loves cooking and cleaning around her house. In her free time, Yin loves to play with her granddaughter. Her husband is retried, and her son in-law is unemployed. Yin’s family receives 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) on a cash card every month to purchase rations. This income is just enough for their daily needs, but they cannot afford to pay other costs like healthcare. Currently, Yin has limited vision and can only make out if it is dark or light outside with her right eye. The vision in Yin’s left eye is starting to blur, and she cannot see far with her left eye. She is worried that she will lose vision in both of her eyes. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Yin. On June 8th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Yin's natural lenses and replace them with an intraocular lens implant in each eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Yin shared, "Before my vision started to blur, I used to make and sell mohinga [a type of Burmese noodles]. With the money that I earned from selling mohinga, I was able to buy vegetables for my family. However, when the vision in my right eye vision became blurred, I could no longer make mohinga anymore. I hope that my vision will be restored after I complete my treatment.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded