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Christina Leswal

MONTHLY DONOR

Cayman Islands

Christina's Story

Christina joined Watsi on April 25th, 2015. Five years ago, Christina became the 1165th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 4,789 more people have become monthly donors! Christina's most recent donation traveled 8,100 miles to support Esther, a mother of six from Kenya, to fund surgery for her acute appendicitis.

Impact

Christina has funded healthcare for 49 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Christina

Abigail

Abigail is a young toddler from Tanzania who was born a healthy child and had no health-related problems. Abigail’s father is a pastoralist who keeps cows, goat and sheep, her mother is a stay-home mother. About six weeks ago she started having what her parents described as fits and her parents rushed her to a nearby hospital where they tried to manage the fits and referred her to another hospital for further management. At the referral hospital, it was determined that Abigail had a brain abscess and needed surgery immediately. Due to lack of a neurosurgeon at that hospital, Abigail was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC Hospital for treatment. Abigail’s parents could not afford the surgery and so ALMC-The Plaster House paid for her brain abscess drainage surgery, which was done on 9th April. Since then, she has been recovering on antibiotics. Abigail has developed hydrocephalus due to ventriculitis which is an inflammation of the ventricles in the brain and she needs surgery to relieve the building of pressure in her brain. As a result of her condition, Abigail has been experiencing increased head size faster than a normal child due to fluid accumulation. Without treatment, Abigail will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,238 to cover the cost of surgery for Abigail that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 23rd and will drain the excess fluid from Abigail's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Abigail will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Abigail’s mother says, “My daughter was talking and eating and had started to walk on her own, everything has happened so fast. Please help her get this treatment, please.”

100% funded

$1,238raised
Fully funded
Myat

Myat is a two-month-old boy who lives with his family in Hpa-An Town, Karen State, Burma. His father passed away when his mother was two months pregnant with him. Myat’s mother is a homemaker and she takes care of him at home. All of his sister and brothers are students. Myat’s grandfather drives a tricycle taxi. On 6 June 2019, Myat was born without any complications at HGH. Since he was born, his mother noticed that he has been passing white coloured stools, but she did not do anything about it because she thought it was normal. When he was just over a month old, his mother noticed that Myat’s navel was bigger than normal. His mother then took him to HGH. The doctor examined his navel and told his mother not to worry too much and he also told her come back if it becomes bigger. A few days later, Myat’s mother noticed that his navel has become bigger and his mother took him to the hospital again. The doctor again took a look at Myat’s navel and advised his mother to take him to a hospital in Yangon for treatment. However, Myat’s mother did not have money to go to Yangon. On 6 September 2019 Myat received an X-ray at Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) and was given a diagnosis of a bulging navel and biliary atresia, a childhood disease of the liver in which one or more bile ducts are abnormally narrow, blocked, or absent. Currently, Myat still passes white coloured stools. He also has a bulging navel which never goes away. His mother is very much worried for him, especially that she just learned about his liver disease. Myat’s mother said, “I would like him to be like other children. I feel bad for him but at the same time happy that an organization Burma Children Medical Fund will help him for his treatment.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Khin

Khin is a 39-year-old woman who lives with her family in Hpa-An Township, Karen State, Burma. Both her children are in preschool. She and her husband are subsistence farmers, growing rice during the rainy season on rented land. The rest of the year, her husband collects leaves used to make roofs, works as a daily labourer or collects branches to sell. Khin was born with a scar the size of an ant bite on her upper lip. Her parents thought that it would disappear or heal on its own but the scar developed into a growth and increased in size. Her parents passed away when she was young and after that she went to live with her brother’s family. By the time she was around 20 years old, the growth had become large and soft, covering the area between her upper lips and her nose. When the pain became unbearable in 2005, her uncle dropped her off at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Thailand, a free clinic close to where her uncle used to work. At this point, the growth had become so large that dragged her upper lip down and extended into her nostrils. At MTC, she was seen by doctors and medics, before she was diagnosed with a hemangioma. At this point, the growth had worsened, and she was bleeding from her lips. In April 2006, Khin went to Chiang Mai Hospital and had the hemangioma removed surgically. The growth later has returned. Overtime, the hemangioma has increased in size and become hard. It has now expanded into Khin’s nostrils, especially her left nostril, which causes her to have difficulty breathing at times. She feels uncomfortable but is not in pain. Sometimes she also feels like she has a blood clot in her nostrils during her nosebleeds. Because the nosebleed can start at any time and can last anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, her life revolves around managing her nosebleeds. She is unable to work or sleep properly, and if she is about to have a nosebleed, she is unable to eat. The nosebleeds have also affected her ability to earn an income for her children and continues to impact her social life. “When I socialise, I do not feel comfortable and some people think I have a disease that I can infect them with,” said Khin. “So, I hope to get better after surgery, and I hope I will no longer have nosebleeds. I don’t want to bleed, and I want to socialise with my friends and family happily. [Right now] my friends won’t even touch me.”

91% funded

91%funded
$1,378raised
$122to go