K

Ken Sobel

MONTHLY DONOR

Ken's Story

Ken joined Watsi on August 12th, 2017. Three years ago, Ken joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Ken's most recent donation supported Maxwell, an 8-year-old boy from Kenya, to fund testicular surgery.

Impact

Ken has funded healthcare for 39 patients in 8 countries.

All patients funded by Ken

Maxwell

Maxwell is a young boy from Kenya. A few months after his birth during a bath, Maxwell’s mother noticed that one of his testes had not descended. A few days later she took him to the hospital for the doctor’s review. After an examination, the doctor told Maxwell’s mother that his condition is normal and that it will resolve with time. More than two years later she went back to the same facility for a doctor’s examination for Maxwell. The physician immediately referred them to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center BethanyKids Hospital for treatment. Upon arrival, Maxwell was reviewed and scans were done. The doctor advised them to wait for two more years to see if there would be any change on its own. During clinic review after two more years, the doctor advised testicular surgery. Three years ago, Maxwell’s mother separated from his father due to family disagreements. The separation left her to take care of their two children. And, earlier this year, Maxwell’s mother lost her job due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She used to be a private school teacher and now she takes on casual jobs she can find to sustain her family. She has currently enrolled in the ‘kazi mtaani program’ where she works eleven days a month and the other days she does laundry work for her neighbors. The upcoming surgery for her son is a very steep mountain for her to climb as she cannot raise the funds. Maxwell’s mother is appealing for financial help. Maxwell was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Maxwell has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Maxwell will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on October 8th. AMHF is requesting $561 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Maxwell’s mother says, “With the current situation I am in as a single parent, it is difficult for me to even sustain my family. I am requesting for any financial help that can be offered to us.”

29% funded

29%funded
$165raised
$396to go
Emma

Looking jovial, 26-year-old Emma walks into the office wearing a broad smile. However, behind the joy and smile are recurring stomach pains that give her sleepless nights. Emma was diagnosed with symptomatic cholelithiasis - a gall bladder disorder that requires laparoscopic cholecystectomy analgesia surgery. If left untreated, cholelithiasis can lead to serious complications such as tissue damage, tears in the gallbladder, and infection that could spread spreads to other parts of her body. In Mid-April 2020, Emma started experiencing recurring pains burning in nature. She tried managing the pains using over the counter pain killers but the pain kept recurring. About a week later she was forced to visit a health centre in her home town Kayole for medical checkup. Emma was treated for suspected ulcers at the facility and was discharged with anti-acids. The pains seemed under control for over a month but they recurred in July. She went back to the same facility where a scan, x-ray, and further tests were recommended. Results indicated that she had cholelithiasis and she required urgent surgery. Doctors from the facility recommended she go to Kijabe Hospital for treatment. Emma is a single mother of one. She shared that she is raising her 6-month-old baby on her own after the father of the child left them and declined responsibility. She works as a shop attendant about 10km from her home and earns a total of $100 monthly income as her salary. To enable her to fend for the family, she has a house helper who takes care of her little child while she out looking for their daily bread. She pays the house help $35 a month. The three live in a single room rental which costs $50 a month. The remaining less than $20 is not enough to buy food and basic needs and still cover the cost of surgery. Emma is the oldest in a family of three. Her siblings are unemployed and live with their mother in the village. They depend on produce from their ¼ acre farm for survival. Emma’s employer and few close relatives contributed a small amount for the surgery but she still needs $616 in financial support to fund the treatment. Emma shared, “I need this surgery to get better and take care of my small family. I am the father and the mother to my little kid and my siblings depend on me. The small salary I get I barely make enough for our family and we basically live from hand to mouth. I have to spend all the income I make.”

53% funded

53%funded
$330raised
$286to go
Samwel

Samwel is a 14-month baby boy from Tanzania, the third born in a family of three children. He was born healthy but after one week his parents started noticing that his head was growing significantly. They took him to several hospitals where he was given medication but his condition was worsening. They were referred to another hospital in another city where Samwel was diagnosed with hydrocephalus and a VP Shunt was placed for him when he was three months old. He was discharged home doing well until a week ago when he started getting regular fevers. His mother noticed that there was a wound on his stomach and they could see the tube that was placed when he was three months old. Samwel’s father heard about treatment for children with hydrocephalus at Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC from our outreach team and when his son got sick he reached out for treatment and support. Samwel’s father is a subsistence farmer and his mother is a housewife. They do not earn enough to be able to afford Samwel’s needed treatment. Samwel has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Samwel has been experiencing increased head circumference and frequent fevers. Without treatment, Samwel will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,362 to cover the cost of surgery for Samwel that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 13th and will drain the excess fluid from Samwel's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Samwel will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Samwel's father says, "I have been to several places for my son's treatment, right now I cannot afford this other surgery he needs. Please help him get this needed treatment."

100% funded

$1,362raised
Fully funded
David

David is a farmer from Kenya who is married and a father of two children aged 4 and 2. The young couple depends on casual jobs to cater for their young family. Since he was involved in a road accident, David has not been able to work. His wife has been doing all kinds of work to make sure that the family get the basic needs needed. He feels sorry for his dear wife because she strains a lot and wishes that he could help but he can’t because of his weak hand. David underwent emergency surgery in July, involving a scalp repair and washout for a grade 2 open humerus fracture and to fix his left humerus and left bimalleolar fractures. However, it was noted that the repair of his left humerus was unacceptable. He therefore underwent revision ORIF of his humerus in August. Six months later, David has come for review, he is doing better and has returned to near normal life activity. Unfortunately, he still has left elbow stiffness, which has prevented him fully resuming his normal life and requires further treatment. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 24th, David will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. He will be able to move his hand freely, function better and help his wife care for their family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $771 to fund this procedure. David says, “I am doing well, I can hold to something but I can’t carry or lift heavy items because of my weak hand. I am looking forward to regain my energy and help my wife to provide for our family.”

100% funded

$771raised
Fully funded