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Success! Mo from Burma raised $1,500 to fund a leg amputation to alleviate her pain and discomfort.

Mo
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Mo's treatment was fully funded on December 29, 2022.
August 3, 2022

Mo is a 72-year-old woman who lives with her friend and friend’s grandson in Burma. During her free time, she enjoys selling vegetables that she foraged. She and her friend are both domestic workers, but Mo had to stop working two months ago due to her worsening condition. Once she stopped working, they began having difficulty purchasing food for themselves. However, Mo shares that her neighbors kindly started providing them with donated food, helping them get by.

One day while washing clothes, Mo noticed that her lower left leg and foot were swollen and in pain. Over time, she developed multiple ulcers on the swollen area. She eventually stopped working and sought medical treatment at a nearby village clinic. However, the medication she received unfortunately did not help her condition, and she could not seek treatment elsewhere due to financial constraints.

Over time, the ulcers became larger and more painful, preventing her from putting any weight on her left foot and walking. Her condition is also causing her to experience weakness, difficulty sleeping, a decreased appetite, and emotional distress. After a worried neighbor took a picture of Mo and posted it on Facebook explaining her situation and requesting the assistance of donors, a charity group saw the post and traveled to Mo’s house. One of the group’s members is a doctor and recommended that she visit a hospital due to her leg being badly infected. The charity group members brought her to our medical partner’s care center Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH).

There, Mo underwent a physical examination and was diagnosed with chronic ulcers due to Buerger’s disease, a condition that affects blood vessels in the body, causing them to swell. This can prevent blood flow and lead to clots forming. Her doctor recommends that her left leg, which has began turning black from the knee down, be amputated as soon as possible due to it being severely infected. Mo shared that neither she nor the charity group have enough money to fund her needed surgery.

Fortunately, a doctor recommended Mo to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, who is helping her receive treatment. On August 4th, surgeons will perform a leg amputation, which will hopefully alleviate Mo from her pain and discomfort. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure.

Mo shares, “At first, I felt hopeless, and I would cry every day and night. I had no one that I could ask for help. I am no longer able to bear this pain. I want to say thank you to everyone who has helped me.”

Mo is a 72-year-old woman who lives with her friend and friend’s grandson in Burma. During her free time, she enjoys selling vegetables that...

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Mo's Timeline

  • August 3, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Mo was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • August 3, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Mo's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • August 4, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Mo was scheduled to receive treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 29, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Mo's treatment was fully funded.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Mo's treatment update from Burma Children Medical Fund.

Funded by 4 donors

Funded by 4 donors

Treatment
Amputation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,397 for Mo's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,897 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,558
Medical Staff
$108
Medication
$2
Supplies
$158
Travel
$16
Labs
$20
Radiology
$5
Other
$530
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Diagnosis involves broken bones, pain, and swelling.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Broken bones lead to decreased mobility. Patients are unable to do their normal daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most people in remote areas try to fix the broken legs/arms by themselves. People go to spiritual healers or traditional massagers for healing. Sometimes the broken bone heals, but not in the correct position.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After a series of x-rays, the doctor then decides on surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Healing takes time, especially for bones. When the bones have completely healed, patients will be able to get back to their normal activities without pain and/or swelling.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks include allergic response, infection, malignancy (very rare), osteoporosis, and migration.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Since most of our medical partner's patients come from remote areas of Burma, the treatment is not easily accessible, as it is only available in big cities like Rangoon. Patients cannot afford the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

None. If the broken bones are not fixed, patients will have to spend their lives in pain. If the swelling turns out to be malignant then it will spread faster, costing the patient’s life.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.